Skip to main content

Full text of "The College Forum: Lebanon Valley College Publication (Spring 1898)"

See other formats


HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS OP STATIONERY. 

22 East Main St, ANNVILLE. 



Oup Sh*i /es are eonstantly filled with 
flew, shcond-HAND and shhuf worn 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, 



TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

STATIONERY, 
Wall PapeiMtfindoua Shades. 



A Selected Stock of the LATEST STYLES OF WALL 
PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

We Buy, Sell, and Exchange Old 
and New Text Books.. 



Teachers' 
Co-operative Association 

ESTABLISHED IN 1884. 
POSITIONS FILLED, 4,ooo. 



101 The Auditorium Building, 
CHICAGO, ILL, 

Seeks Teachers who are ambitious for advance- 
ment rather than those without positions. 

UNITED BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. FUNK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 



TEXT H5D REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Supplied to students at the lowest figures. Special 
facilities for furnishing books to 

UIBRHHIES. 

Prices will quoted on any list of books submitted. 
Any book in the market, either American or foreign, can 
be supplied. The latest publications received as issued, 
logue furnished on application. The 

WTB3HHTIOHAI1 BIBUES 

3 be had. Text, Reference and Teach- 
ers' editions in a great variety of styles at the lowest 
prices. New "Helps" prepared especially for this line 
by both American and English scholars. Send for 
catalogue. ^-Agents wanted for our 

HEW SEUF BXPIiRftRTORY TEACHERS' B1BUE. 

Liberal terms. Address, 

W. I?. FUfJK. Dayton, Ohio. 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIME TABLE— Dec. 1, 1897. 



Leave 



Winchester 

Martins burg 

Hagerstown 

Greencastle 

Mercersburg 

Chambersburg. . 

Waynesboro 

Shippensburg... 

Newville 

Carlisle 

Mechanicsburg. 

Dillsburg 

Ar. Harrisburg . 



fA. M. 



6 45 

7 07 



7 30 
7 00 

7 50 

8 07 
8 26 
8 45 



fA. M. 

7 30 

8 15 

9 01) 
9 22 

8 30 

9 45 



10 05 
10 23 

10 45 

11 06 



+A. M. 



11 35 

12 20 
12 42 

11 10 
1 05 

12 15 
1 24 

1 41 

2 05 
2 27 

1 40 

2 45 
P. M. 

t. 47 

5 23 

6 00 
P. M. 



1.0 



fP. M. 

2 30 

3 17 

4 05 

4 28 

3 30 

5 00 

4 00 

5 20 
ft K8 

6 02i 
6 25! 
5 10 
C 4.! 

p. m. : 

10 20 

3 68! 
9 4.5 
! P. M. i 



*P. M. 



102 

'aTs; 



10 15 l 
10 37] 



7 30 

7 52 



11 00! 8 15 



11 20] 

11 37 j 

12 00 
12 23 



8 35 

8 54 

9 .17 
9 -10 



9 00 11326 2 45i 6 4.' 12 46] in 00 

; p. m. p. m. p. m. ! p. m. ; A. M. i P. M 
Ar. Philadelphia.. | 11 48 3 00 ;. 47! 10 20 4 SO 12 50 

" New York | 2 13 5 53 8 231 3 53] 7 3:1 3 30 

" Baltimore.... 12 40 3 11 6 OOj 9 45 , 6 20 12 43 

I P. M. P. M . P. M. ! P. M. i A. M. P. M. 

Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg 
daily, except Sunday, at 5.50 a. m., 7.05 a. m., 12.20 p. m.. 
3.45 p. m. and 9.10 p. in., and from Mechanicsburg at 6.14 
a. m., 7.29 a. m., 9.39 a. m., 12.45 p. m., 4.10 p. m., 5.35 p. 
ni., and 9.35 p. m., stopping at 2d street, Harrisburg, to 
let off passenger-. 

Train No. 10 runs daily between Harrisburg and Hag- 
erstown. 

\ No. 102 Sunday only. 

* Daily. t Daily except Sunday. 



Leave 



Baltimore.... 
New York ... 
Philadelphia 



p. M. 
11 50 
. 40 
11 20 
fA. M. 

Harrisburg i 5 00 

Dillsburg" j 

Mechanicsburg | 5 19 

Carlisle : 5 40 

Newville ! 6 04 

Shippensburg i 6 23 

Waynesboro ! 

Chambersburg (i 43 

Mercersburg j 8 10 

Greencastle 7 10 

Hagerstown 7 32 

Martinsburg i 8 24 

Ar. Winchester j 9 10 

1 A. M. 



A. M. 
4 55 
12 05 
4 30 
tA. M. 
7 55 



8 12 
8 36 

8 59 

9 16 
10 37 

9 35 
10 30 
10 02 

10 25 

11 25 

12 35 
P. M. 



A. M. 

8 50 



8 30 
fA. M. 

11 45 

12 40 
12 05 
12 30 
12 52 

1 11 

2 10 
1 33 



2 00 

2 25 



P. M. 



A. M. 

12 00 
8 50 
12 25 
fP. M. 

3 50! 

4 33 
4 12i 

4 35] 

5 00 

5 181 

6 161 

5 40; 

6 30! 
6 04 

6 27 

7 10 
7 55 

P. M. 



P. M. 
4 49 

1 50 
84 35 
♦P^ M. 

55 



8 14 

8 33 

8 52 

9 10 

"9'28 

"9*49 
10 10 



P. M. 



103 

A. M. 

4 35 
12 05 
4 30 
§A. M. 
8U0 



8 20 

8 43 

9 08 
9 27 

'9 47 

16" ii 

10 S5 



A.M. 



Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily, ex- 
cept Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at 
9.35 a. m., 2.00 p. m., 5.25 p. in., 6.25 p. m. and 10.55 p. m., 
also for Mechanicsburg, Dillsburg and intermediate sta- 
tions at 8.22 a. m. All the above trains will stop at Sec- 
ond street, Harrisburg, to take on passengers. 

No. 9 runs daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 
§ No. 103 Sunday only. * Daily. 

t Daily except Sunday. 

| On Sundays will leave Philadelphia at 4.30 p. m. 

Pullman parlor cars and through coaches between Hag- 
erstown and Philadelphia on trains 2 and 9. and through 
coaches between Winchester and Philadelphia on trains 
4 and 7. 

H. A. Riddle, J. F. Boyd, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Supt. 



Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler, 

CLUB, COLLEGE & FRATERNITY 
EMBLEMS, WATCHES, DIAM' 
ONDS, JEWELRY. X X X % 



198 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates Furnished 



The College Forum 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



(OL. XI. No. 1. ANX VILLE, PA., JANUABY, 1898. Whole No. 107. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 



THE COLLEGE FOFUM is published monthly 
throughout the college year by the Philokosmian 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College, 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 



Jay W. Yok, '98. 
Allen U. Baer, 'ox. 



H. Howard Hoy, '99. 
D. M. Over, "01. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT, 

. G. CllPPlNGKR, '99, Business Manager. 
. F. Daugherty, '00. Assistant Business Manager. 



Terms ; Twentyvfive cents a year, five cents a copy, 
THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to 
all subscribers until an order is received for its dis' 
continuance, and until all arrearages have been paid. 

Address all communications, articles for publication, 
vutepf 8 ' e ' C " t(> W - G> C11 PP in ger, Box 86, Ann- 

<lf™ m 16 -? at the Post ° ftice at Anpville, Pa., as second 
mail matter. 



EDITORIALS, 



Str at 



nge New Song for a Bereft Young 
Lover, 

Note: This poem is not to be taken too 
"ously. The author's desire is that it be 
as much for the art as for the sense, 
ovever, it is easy to believe that there are 
* y y ° Ung husbands who should want just 
a song to sing, were they to lose suddenly 
e Pnde of their youthful robustness. 

Norman Cousstock Schuchtsr. 

Sh 

e w ent to her death at the foot of a tree, 

Her t0 My lady ' ° h ' my lady ! 

0ll gue had been wed to a poison bee 



And she fainted down at the feet of me 
A sweet but dead, dead lady. 

I stroked the curls of her there in the shade — 

My lady, oh, my lady ! 
While my tears ran hot as a molten blade 
At thought of my being a mourner made 

By sweet, but dead, dead lady. 

Ah ! who had persuaded my delicate bride, 

My lady, oh, my lady ! 
To fall in her bloom on her fondest side 
And leave me alone to a tossing tide ? 

Can'st answer, dead, dead lady ? 

But a hawk swept by in the evening sky, — 

My lady, oh, my lady ! 
And the dumb was yet dumb and did not reply 
To the question asked by my soul a-cry 

Of sweet, but dead, dead lady. 

I buried her deep in a golden bay; — 

My lady, oh, my lady ! 
And the angels in heaven there heard me pray 
That her soul would rise with the dawning day, 

The soul of dead, dead lady. 

And now I joy that she dwelleth above, 

My lady, oh, my lady ! 
That ev'ry night a white down-soaring dove 
Doth bear me a message of sainted love 

From sweet, but dead, dead lady ! 



The Day of Prayer for Colleges 
will be observed on the 27th. We 
ask all our friends in the co-operating 
conferences to observe the day, — to 
meet "with one accord" in their accus- 
tomed place of worship in special 
prayer for Lebanon Valley College. 
If it is not convenient so to do, let 
there be private prayer from every 



2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



heart, or let the exercise on Sabbath 
be of that nature. In some special 
way, bring the College before our 
people, and let there be united prayer 
in her behalf. Thank God (a) for 
such a large increase of students, (b) 
for solid financial growth, (c) for spirit- 
ual growth, (d ) for the success of all 
colleges, [e) for the increased number 
and the liberality of the friends of the 
College. Then pray earnestly (a) for 
the President and Faculty, (b) for the 
Field Secretary, (c) for God's Spirit to 
be poured out in a larger measure 
upon the students, (d ) for a continued 
increase of students and liberal friends, 
(e) and for enlarged facilities. "All 
things whatsoever ye shall ask in 
prayer, believing, ye shall receive." 



* 



December 22 closed the most pros- 
perous term in the history of Lebanon 
Valley College. The total number of 
students has been one hundred and 
sixty — fifty more than have been en- 
rolled at any previous Fall term. The 
work done has been gratifying and 
the increasing earnestness of spirit 
among the students is a notable fea- 
ture. 

The second term will open January 
3d, for enrollment, and on the follow- 
ing morning the President, Dr. H. U. 
Roop, will deliver the opening ad- 
dress. A number of lectures already 
arranged for will be helpful features 
of the winter and spring. Among 
the speakers will be Dr. Hurlburt, of 
Philadelphia, who will deliver a course 
of lectures on Bible study and practi- 
cal topics. Bishop E. B. Kephart, 
and Dr. Miller, of Harrisburg, will 



each give a course of talks. 

A new course of study is now 
progress, which will include sev 
years' work, instead of six as here 
fore. It will be announced in the new 
catalogue to be issued in the spring 
and will go into effect at the opening 
of the following Fall term. 



* 

* . * 



I do NOT BELIEVE there is a Ch: 
tian man or woman on the face of 
the earth, but that has to encouni 
his or her share of difficulties. Tl 
Christian life is one of continued w: 
fare, a struggle against our ow 1 e 1 
natures. Our success in this gr< 
battle depends much upon the kind 
weapons we use. Many of us thi: 
that we are able to fight alone, and 
this end we go forth relying wholl] 
upon our strength of mind and char- 
acter. As a result Satan gets tie 
better of us and our trouble is increas< 
rather than diminished. If we coi 
but give ourselves into the hands 
Him who ruleth all things well ant 
allow him to use us as he would, 
would be relieved of many of 
anxieties of life. 

Let us learn a lesson from 
Brahmin lady in the poem, " 



Refuge": 



soul I 



In the secret of his presence how my 

lights to hide ! 
Oh, how precious are the lessons which 1 e 

at Jesus' side ! 
Earthly cares can never vex me, neither 

lay me low, 
For when Satan comes to tempt me, 11 

secret place I go. 

When my soul is faint and thirsty, ' Iieatl1 
shadow of His wing ^ 

There is cool and pleasant shelter and a 
and crystal spring; 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



3 



\ni ni y Savior rests beside me as we hold com- 
munion sweet; 
I tried I could not utter what he says when 
thus we meet. 

)nly this I know: I tell him all my doubts 

and griefs and fears, 
)h how patiently he listens, and my drooping 

soul he cheers ! 
)o you think he ne'er reproves me ? What a 

false friend he would be, 
If he never, never told me of the sins which he 
must see ' 

Do you think that I could love him half so well, 

or as I ought, 
If he did not tell me plainly of my sinful deed 

and thought ? 
fo, he is so very faithful, and that makes me 

trust him more, 
Por I know that he does love me, though he 
wounds me very sore. 

Would you like to know the sweetness of the 

secret of the Lord ? 
Go and hide beneath his shadow, this shall then 

be your reward. 
And whene'er you leave the silence of the 

special meeting-place, 
You must mind and bear the image of your 
Master in your face. 

You will surely lose the blessing and the full- 
ness of your joy, 
If you let dark clouds distress you and your 

inward peace destroy. 
You may always be abiding, if you will, at 
Jesus' side, 

In the secret of His presence you may e very 
moment hide. 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY. 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION. 

Rev. H. U. Roop, A. M., Ph. D., President, 
Professor of Philosophy, Pedagogy and Oratory. 

John E. Lehman, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics and. Astronomy. 

Rev. James T. Spanglee, A. M., B. D., 
Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

H. Lenich Meyee, B. S., 
Professor of the Natural Sciences. 

Rev. Benjamin F. Daugherty, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

M. Etta Wolfe, A. M., 
Professor ot the Modern Languages and English Liter.-; 
ture. 

Cakeie E. Smith, 
Professor of Instrumental Music and Theory. 

Mks. H. U Roop, A. M., 
Professor of Vocal Cultuie and Art. 

Willoughby S. Wilde, L. L. C. M., 
Professor of Harmony and Vocal Music. 

Hattie S. Shellky, M. E., 
Teacher of Elocution and Physical Culture. 

Leah C. Hartz, 
Teacher of Stenography and Typewriting. 

Bishop E. B. Kephart, D.D., LL.D., 
Lecturer on International Law and Biblical Antiquities 

George Rigler Shenk, A. M., M. D., 
Lecturer on Hygiene. 

O. P. DeWitt, A. M., 
History and English. 



Y.M. C A. 

Jay W. Yoe, President. 
S. F. Daugherty. Secretary. 



* * 

* 



PERSONALS. 

On Dec. 10 Bishop E. B. Kephart, 
U A L,L,.D., gave a very practical 
aQ d instructive address to the students 
0n Rome, ancient and modern. The 
Bishop is very well informed on this 
* ub ject, as he has been a visitor to this 
pous city. Much knowledge can 

e gleaned from books but no history 
can give such a vivid description of 

l °me as did the Bishop. 



Y, W. C. A. 

Leah C. Hartz, President. 
Anna Myers, Secretary. 

COLLEGE LIBRARIAN. 

Prof. J. T. Spangler. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

W. G. Clippingek, President. 

Wm. Sanders, Secretary. 

0. P. DeWitt. Foot Ball Manager. 

LECTURE COMMITTEE, 

Harry Imboden, President. 
Allen Baer, Secretary. 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



President Roop spent most of his 
vacation soliciting students. 

Adam Wier, 'oo, preached a number 
of times for Rev. Joel Light at Kauff- 
man's church recently. 

Mr. C. E. Snoke, 'oo, preached in 
the Methodist church, Lebanon. 

Prof, in Civil Gov.— "Mr. D., what 
is private property ?" 

Mr. D. — "Property not exposed to 
the public." 

D. E. Long preached for Rev. 
Blecker at Palmyra, on Dec. 19. 

Jay W. Yoe, '98, conducted the 
devotional exercises of the Y. P. C. U. 
of Annville, on Sunday evening, Dec. 
19. 

Prof, in Astronomy. — "Mr. L., 
when the moon is between the earth 
and the sun, in which direction will 
the shadow fall ?" 

Mr. L. — "Towards the sun, of 
course." 

Mr. Sollenberger made such an 
extended visit to his lady friend 
recently that he deemed it proper to 
take his trunk along with him. 

Prof, in Astronomy. — "Miss K., 
how long are comets in sight ?" 

Miss K. — "Some smaller comets 
pass from sight before they are seen." 

Mr. Sanders, Mr. Derrickson, and 
Mr. C. V. Clippinger have at last # suc- 
ceeded in conceiving a plan whereby 
they can gain notoriety. Their plan is 
to cut up fire escapes, get some good 
screw eyes, and then combine the two. 
It works pretty well usually. If you 
don't believe it, ask Martin. 



Prof. J. T. Spangler greatly j 
proved his recitation room during 
cation. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. U. Roop and P r 
and Mrs. B. F. Daugherty spent X 
at their home with Mr. H. J. R 
and family, Highspire. 

The church choir, under the efficie 
leadership of Prof. J. E. Lehman, 
sisted by Mrs. Dr. Roop, teacher 
vocal culture, gave a very enjoyab 
song service Sunday evening, D- 
12th, in the College church. 

Prof, in History.— "Mr. K., i 
was Ptolemy?" 

Mr. K.— "A Dutchman." 

Mr. Jacob Zerbe, '98, has ma' 
ulated again as a student of L. V. 
His many friends welcome him ba 
again to his former home. 

The Winter Term opened m 
additions to every class in the colle 
and a number to the preparatory 
classes. 

Prof, in Civil Gov.— "Mr. D., wlia 
is a copyright ?" _ 

Mr. D.— "The right to copy." 

• J. Edgar Knipp, a graduate j 
John Hopkins University, who is J 
present pursuing the regular course 1 
Union Biblical Seminary, at DayW 
Ohio, visited the College on the 21st) 
and gave a talk to the students « 
Prayer Meeting the following evening' 
He also conducted the chapel service 
on the morning of the 22nd. 

We are glad to welcome the 
students, and trust our associ' 
may prove pleasant and profitab 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



5 



OUR ALUMNI, 



>j 2 . Rev. J. H. Graybill, pastor of 
a church at St. Mary's, Pa., is spend- 
ing his Christmas at Annville with 
"s parents. 

'82. C. K. Geyer, Esq., and wife, 
'80, from Catawissa, Pa., are the guests 
of Mrs. Geyer's parents, on West Main 
Street, during the holidays. 

'82. Mr. C. J. Barr is the first tenor 
singer of a Male Quartet that is 
making a concert tour of the central 
part of the State[and is earning quite a 
reputation. They won first prize at 
the late Allentown Eistedfodd. 

'87. Dr. G. R. Shenk will deliver 
several lectures to the students next 
term. 

'92. D. A. Kreider, Ph.D , and wife, 
from New Haven, are in town over 
the holidays. Dr. Kreider was recent- 
ly elected an active member of the 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. This society was founded 
in 1779, and is one of the highest 
authorities on scientific subjects. This 
election is a very distinguished honor 
to Dr. Kreider, and one in which his 
Alma Mater proudly shares. 

'92. Jac. M. Herr is teaching in 
tl] e public schools of Grape, Mich., 
and i s very successful. He is having 
one eye toward the law as his 
Passion. 

'94- W. H. Kreider, Esq., has 
^ely moved to Philadelphia, where 
. Wl h practice his chosen profes- 
Sl °n-law. 

97- Raymond P. Daugherty is mak- 



ing for himself a fine record as Pro- 
fessor of Natural Science, at Avalon 
College, Trenton, Mo. 

'97. Rev. Harry Boyer, who is 
preaching the Word to the people at 
Dover, York Co., has taken to himself 
a wife. So says Dame Rumor. Con- 
gratulations and best wishes to Harry. 

Y. M, C A, NOTES. 

Because of the Musicale and other 
entertainments, the Y. M. C. A. held 
but one devotional meeting. This was 
on Saturday evening, December 18, the 
subject for the evening being "Com- 
plete Surrender." The leader, Mr. 
A. Martin, read Romans 12, calling 
special attention to the first verse. 
He said in part : We as individuals 
may present our bodies a sacrifice. 
Giving ourselves into the hands of the 
Lord is the only way that we can 
successfully work for him. 

We must come to Christ as we are 
and coming thus 'we may expect to 
be received into his favor. 

We are apt to find fault with others, 
but when we examine our own life, 
we find that it is so full of mistakes 
that by the time we have corrected 
them we have no time to criticise 
others. 

Mr. S. F. Daugherty said: Paul's 
life is one after which we may pattern 
with profit. It was one of full sur- 
render to God's service. 

A. Wier advanced the thought that 
it is not the large number of persons 
that bring about the most good, but 
the most fully consecrated. 

A. Crone followed with the words: 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"Lives of great men oft remind us 
We can make our lives sublime, 

And departing leave behind us 
Foot-prints on the sands of time. 

Our lives should be such as will be 
the means of guiding others into a 
purer and nobler life. 

The president, Jay W. Yoe, then fol- 
lowed with a few remarks urging all 
to determine to do better work duri ig 
the next term. 

We regret to say that the i terest 
in Y. M. C. A. work on the part of 
so ne is not what it should be. 

A library committee was added to 
the list of Y. M. C. A. committees at 
the last meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 
It consists of Messrs. C. E. Snoke, 
H. E. Spessard, D. M. Oyer, and A. 
Wier. 

a: 

philokosmian literary society. 



il £sse Quam Videri." 



Ralph D. Reider, 'oo, Editor. 

The closing of the fall term finds 
the P. L. S. in splendid condition. 
We have a strong and vigorous mem- 
bership. The work of the society 
should not relax, however. It is the 
doing of things under wise directions 
that produces educational results. 
This is emphatically the case in 
society work. 

We observe that our members do 
not avail themselves of the benefits of 
our splendid library as much as they 
should. But we trust at the beginning 
of this, the first term of the New Year, 
they will resolve to do much better 
work. 

On the evening of Dec. 17, Mr. 



Karnig M. Kuyoomjian, an Armenia 
joined our ranks. We are always gl 
to welcome new members, and 
especially one who has come such a 
distance to complete his education. 

a; 

WINTER WITH THE POETS, 



Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, 
Arrives the snow, and, driving o'er the fields, 
Seems nowhere to alight ; the whited air 
Hides hills and woods, the river, and thf 
heaven, 

And wills the farm-house at the garden's end. 
The sled and traveler stopped, the courier's 
feet 

Delayed, all friends shut out, the house- 
mates sit 

Around the radiant fire-place, enclosed 
In a tumultuous privacy of storm. 

— Emerson, 



' ' Ah ! bitter chill it was ! 
The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold 
The hare limped trembling through the 
grass, 

And silent was the flock in woolly fold. 
Numb were the Beadsman's fingers while he 
told 

His rosary, and while his frosted breath, 
Like pious incense from a censer old, 
Seem'd taking flights for heaven without a 
death, 

Past the sweet Virgin's picture, while his] 

hesaith." —Keats. 



" Blow, blow, thou winter wind, 
Thou art not so unkind 
As man's ingratitude ; 
Thy touch is not so keen, 
Because thou art not seen, 
Although thy breath be rude. 

Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, 
Thou dost not bite so nigh 
As benefits forgot ; 
Though thou the waters warp, 
Thy sting is not so sharp 
As friend remembered not." 

— Shakes t 



i 



THE COLL 
THOUGHTS FOR THE NEW YEAR, 



t 
tl 



Forgetting those things which are 
behind, and reaching forth unto those 
things which are before, I press toward 
the mark."— Phil. 3: 13, 14- 

' ' Yet I argue not 
\gainst Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot 
Of heart or hope ; but still bear up and steer 
Right onward. ' ' —John Milton. 

"It is an eternal law that no man 
can be wholly defeated unless he 
defeat himself." 

" To live content with small means ; 
to seek elegance rather than luxury, 
refinement rather than fashion ; 
to be worthy, not respectable, and 
wealthy, not rich ; to study hard, 
ink quietly, talk gently, act frankly ; 
listen to stars and birds, to babes 
nd sages with open heart ; to bear 
11 cheerfully, do all bravely, await 
asions, hurry never ; in a word, to 
et the spiritual, unbidden and uncon- 
scious, grow up through the common. 
This is to be my symphony.' 



The out-of-doors for summer, but 
the fireside and our books for winter ! 
So say the most of us, unless sleighing 
and skating may claim our attention. 
fi nt what a mistake ! " Go forth 
under the open sky and list to Nature's 
teachings," not only when grass is 
Shetland flowers are springing, but 
now , in the heart of winter, and 
y°u will be well repaid. "The colors 
e softer, more varied," writes a 
at ure lover. "The red-brown mead- 
° Ws , the fields of silvery grasses, the 
fray-brown trunks and branches of 



the trees, the soft blue hazy outlines 
of the wooded hills, the orange fringe 
of willows marking the course of river 
and creek," all make a never-ending 
variety in a winter walk. The 
botanist may each day find new things 
to interest him. The flowers are gone, 
to be sure, and the fresh leaves, but 
only the uninitiated will say that the 
country is less interesting. Look at 
the trees ! " Now, for the first time 
the beauty of the spray, of the wild 
entanglement of branches becomes 
visible." Now you may mark the 
scars from last year's leaves, and the 
order of their arrangement on the 
stems. Now you may see the buds 
for next year's growth and note their 
coverings of down, or scale, or varnish. 

And the bird lover, too, has rich 
opportunities. What ! who cares to 
study English sparrows? Well, they 
are not uninteresting, but did you 
think they are the only ones of our 
little feathered folk who stay with us ? 
Most of them have g me, to be sure 
but our bird student knows that the 
horned larks are still here ; the noisy 
blue-jay still flashes from tree to tree ; 
the trim little nuthatch with his queer 
"quank, quank ;" the black-capped 
chickadee ; the little gray juncos, 
with their breasts all white as though 
they had been sitting in a saucer of 
cream ; the kingfisher, and the tiny 
golden-crested king-let. all mav bo se< r 
in a winter's walk. Yes, and the 
splendid cardinal grosbeak, or red- 
bird, and his equally distinguished 
looking mate with the glint of olive 
on her wings, may peer at you from 
their hiding-place in the cedars. 

Nature is just as beautiful now as 



8 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



when the violets bloom or the brown 
nuts fall. Only get acquainted with 
her in her winter dress and you will 
love her just as well as ever. 

X 

THE STUDENT! WHO IS HE? 



The average young person has but 
a faint idea of what a college can or 
should do for him. A young man 
goes away to college. His purpose in 
so doing is, so he says, to gain an 
education. This sounds well, and is 
well, in so far as it means anything to 
him. But it is well only that far. If 
he carry with him the notion, prob- 
ably a vague one, that somehow, three 
or four years spent in an academy or 
college will make him an educated 
man, then it is not well. He must 
rid himself of that notion, or it were 
better for him to have stayed at the 
plow. Of course, he may gain some 
things merely by being in college. 
Who woulit not? Even a sponge, if 
placed in water, will contrive to fill 
itself, but being full it is still a sponge. 

Then there is another notion almost 
equally false: that a young man may, 
by simply subjecting himself to the 
discipline of a course of study, become 
educated; that following mechanically 
the daily routine of college work will 
somehow sharpen and brighten him 
into an educated man. Discipline is 
an excellent thing. Grinding is an 
excellent thing also — for sharpening 
an ax or polishing a stone. It must 
not be forgotten that methods of 
teaching, strict requirements on the 
part of teachers, external forces of 
whatever kind, cannot of themselves 



educate a person. The force whic 
develops any organic thing must 
within itself. The gardener m a 
prune and water and fertilize the tre 
but he cannot make it grow. \ 
itself, must have the power whic 
drinks in the sunshine, strikes its roots 
downward, and stretches out its arms. 

The wind is a force and not a thing. 
A young man should not go to college 
to be ground; for he is not a tool to be 
sharpened merely. Nor yet shoul 
he go there to grind; for the world ' 
not a treadmill; nor is he an animal, 
if only he will have it otherwise. 

The student is he who loves knowl- 
edge more than facts, who strives fo 
truth for its ozvn sake; who aspires ' 
manhood rather than to success. H 
sets before himself no mean standard 
of attainment. He goes to college to 
find not a nursery, but a worksh 
He finds his inspiration not outside of 
himself merely, but within himself; and 
with high-minded, unflagging zeal, he 
employs his every energy to become 
first of all, a man. 

VALUE OF DIFFICULTIES, 

By Chas. E. Snoke, 'oo. 

To speak of the value of difficulties 

seems paradoxical. Difficulties are 

mostly regarded as nuisances, and 

consequently are valueless. We are 

apt to think that life would be a far 

better and more useful gift if ^ e 

difficulties which beset it were 

removed. The truth is, however, that 

• life 

a life minus disadvantages is a 
shorn of its usefulness and success. 

the 

Kant sagely observes that since 
only difficulty a bird meets with i' 1 ltb 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



9 



flight is the resistance of the air, one 
juight suppose that if air were removed 
he bird could fly with the greatest 
ease, yet the fact remains that if air 
were removed the bird could not fly 
a t all; the very thing that offers 
resistance to flight becomes the essen- 
tial means of any flight whatever. A 
like nature of things holds throughout 
the range of human affairs. The 
child of luxury who has all his petty 
desires, whims, and appetites satisfied 
and fostered possesses very few chances 
of acquiring self-control, sturdiness of 
purpose, and a knowledge of duty. 
On the other hand the child of lowly 
birth early becomes inured to hard- 
ships and acquires a firm reliance in 
his own powers; he must advance 
against a current of difficulties by his 
own individual effort and exertion; 
he is compelled to put on a forced 
application to his work and an extreme 
tension to his powers. His disad- 
vantages, if they may be called such, 
prevent him from indulging in those 
effeminating habits of his wealthy 
companion. While the child of 
luxury is wasting that most vital part 
°f a successful life — youth — because 
°f too many advantages, the other, by 
reason of his disadvantages, is forming: 
habits of industry and application 
which will tell on his entire future. 

Perhaps nowhere is this better illus- 
trated than in college life. The sons 
of the rich get the idea that effort on 
their part to improve their oppor- 
tunities is useless; they know that 
the >' will fall heir to large fortunes, 
an d they let the golden opportunities 
P as -s unembraced. Not so with the 
)°uth who earns his own way through 



school; he knows that his only hope 
lies in his own talents, and he makes 
the best use of every opportunity to 
cultivate them. A young man not 
long ago made fifteen hundred dollars 
at one of our largest colleges by 
coaching the lazy sons of rich men 
in their examinations. That may 
take them through college but merely 
"getting through" is of little or no 
account. Although a man may buy 
his way through school he cannot buy 
success except by earnest, honest toil 
of some kind. 

The wise Plato remarks that persons 
born to wealth and luxury invariably 
become degenerate. All history 
proves the philosopher's observation. 
Every community is marked by the 
decay of families of the higher classes, 
due to the effeminating effect of 
luxury. 

Our greatest difficulties are, after all, 
our greatest benefactors with simply 
the toga of an enemy. Examine the 
history of all great men and you will 
readily see that - they have all under 
gone a severe training and discipline 
of some sort. "Success is only the 
last term of what looked like a series 
of failures." All the successes of 
history have been wrought from a 
chaos of failure. First attempts 
usually end in defeat. The youth 
who will lose heart at a few failures 
of this nature and then give up in 
sheer despair is not the youth who 
will succeed. If a man fail once, and 
then set himself to search diligently 
for the cause, he will be able to shun 
failure of like nature afterward. 

"Competition is the life of trade." 
The same thing is true in the pro- 



IO 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



fessions. Competition compels the 
novice to undergo a long apprentice- 
ship and a careful preparation before 
he is allowed to enter fully upon his 
career. The degree of success in any 
calling is dependent on the thorough- 
ness of the preparation for that 
particular work. Half preparation 
means the same half success, which is 
as good as none in the chosen pro- 
fession. 

The apprenticeship of the young 
aspirant is in many respects not 
unlike the refining of steel. The 
elements of the best steel are to be 
found in the crude ore, but they are 
of no utility in that uncrystallized 
mass. They must be purified, tough- 
ened, and concentrated before they are 
of value, and the better this has been 
done the more valuable will be the 
metal. So with the mind. It pos- 
sesses natural talents by virtue of 
divine endowment, but they must be 
trained and disciplined before they 
can be of any utility to their possessor. 

Humanity is constitutionally indo- 
lent and only those persons who are 
compelled by difficulties to exert their 
powers to the utmost ever attain the 
highest development of them. This 
is no doubt the best explanation of 
the fact that almost all the eminently 
successful men whose names stand out 
in bold relief on the pages of history, 
have been men of very humble 
beginnings. 

Nothing in all human experience 
brings out the man like hard neces- 
sity. 

"Then welcome each rebuff 
That turns earth's smoothness rough, 
Each sting, that bids, nor stand, nor sit, but go; 
Be our joys three parts pain ! 



Strive and hold cheap the strain; 
Learn, nor account the pang; dare, never grudge 
the throe." 

a: 

ALTIORA, 

Mary E. Kreider, '99. 

Through all ages man has been 
aiming for higher things than he 
already possesses. Such an aim was 
characteristic of Alexander the Great. 
While this may have been a selfish 
aim, yet we admire his perseverance 
and determination to bring all king- 
doms in subjection to himself. 

Napoleon is another example which 
is worthy of mention. His aim was 
to bring reform into the political and 
social state of France. In order to 
accomplish this he called to his 
assistance some of the ablest men in 
all the departments of knowledge. 
The results realized by the high 
aspiration of man not only are felt by 
himself, but very frequently come with 
equal blessing to mankind in general. 
This was the case with Napoleon. 
The Code which he framed forms 
the basis of law in many European 
countries today. A man whose 
influence was more widely felt than 
Napoleon's was Charlemagne. His 
greatest ambition was to restore ordei 
in the church, to thoroughly organize 
the government as well as to effect a 
social reform. In this way he laid the 
foundation for all succeeding reform 
movements. The highest aim char- 
acteristic of any man in the sixteenth 
century was that of Martin Luther, 
who during his early childhood yea rs 
received evidences of the corruption °| 
the clergy and also of the sale 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



'ndulgences which he strongly op- 
posed. His aim was to bring the 
ignorant class of people, who were 
being deceived by the clergy, into a 
higher state of enlightenment, declar- 
ing to them that the remission of sins 
as from God alone. Tims we see 
hn in the face of all opposition 
nailing his ninety-five theses on the 
'oor at Wittenberg, and before the 
iet at Worms we hear him in all 
oldness refusing to retract any of his 
teachings unless they could be refuted 
by the Bible. But— 

"The heights by great men reached and kept 
Were not attained by sudden flight, 

But they, while their companions slept, 
Were toiling upward in the night." 

Thus we see that m order to be of 
service to our country as well as to 
the individual, we must place our aim 
in life high and strive to reach it. It 
is the sense of duty to himself, to his 
brother, and to God which leads man 
to form this ideal conception of life 
and which urges him ever onward and 
upward to its attainment. The 
gradual attainment of our ideal in life 
may be likened to a mountain- 
climber who does not scale its cloud- 
capped heights by a smooth and 
rockless path, but by the overcoming 
of numberless difficulties. And then 
e ach difficulty encountered and fought 
courageously enables him the better 
to overcome the succeeding and 
greater difficulties. In like manner 
l 'ery obstacle which he surmounts in 
k broadens his horizon. Standing 
the foot of the hills, he does not 
; the highest peaks and may be led 
believe that the top of the nearest 
^ is the greatest height attainable, 
I when he reaches its summit he 



sees before him a higher pinnacle and 
without yielding to discouragement 
he begins his ascent anew. But the 
summit of each succeeding peak is 
reached only to see looming up before 
him one still higher. And thus by 
ascending each successive peak he is 
finally enabled to reach the true sum- 
mit, the height of heights, the goal of 
his ambition. So in life, we lift our 
eyes to a standard which we think is 
the highest life and seek to attain it, 
but having attained it we find that it 
is not the perfect life. This may be 
a source of discouragement to the 
youth, who may have fixed all his 
energies upon the attainment of some 
grand scheme and when he finds that 
the path to this attainment is not 
devoid of its hidden obstacles, it may 
be only the powerful influence of other 
men's lives which urges him onward; or 
it may be a realization of his duty to 
his Creator and, most of all, that his 
Master demands it of him. Popular 
applause is, of course, gratifying, but 
there are times when a man's own 
satisfaction with his conduct is a 
better criterion of merit. There 
should be no cause for depression in 
recalling the fact that success will not 
always bring riches or fame Though 
these rewards will be lavishly dis- 
tributed, he to whom they may not be 
forthcoming will have in his own 
keeping a more valuable reward if he 
endures to the end and remains true 
to himself and his mission ! He also 
realizes that he is duty-bound to live 
as perfect a life as possible for his own 
well-being as well as that of his 
brothers, for no man can live with- 
out exerting a powerful influence upon 



12 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the lives of his fellow-men. This 
influence ought therefore be as near as 
possible that of a ' perfect life. How 
important therefore in this respect is 
the advice of Shakespeare: "To thine 
own self be true and it must follow as 
the night the day, thou canst not then 
be false to any man." After all that 
is said about our duty to others the 
fact remains that our first and greatest 
duty is to ourselves. It is well to 
help others, but it is presumption to 
offer to give what one has not. 
Therefore this life of perfection must 
first be reached by ourselves before we 
can influence others to the attainment 
of this high ideal. We find that the 
highest aim of the artist is to portray 
upon the canvas nature in the highest 
perfection possible, which will give 
impetus to others who have similar 
aspirations. This same spirit is mani- 
fested by the athlete as well as by 
men in all vocations in life. They 
are continually striving for the attain- 
ment of something higher than that 
which they already possess. But the 
highest aim which man can possess is 
the aim of the Christian, who has as 
his ideal the Perfect Man. In his 
pursuit for the attainment of this ideal 
all the worldly qualities of character 
vanish and these become stepping 
stones to higher things, thus making 
his life nobler. Whether he be king 
or servant, whether it be upon the 
world's great fields of action or in the 
private life, if he has his life modeled 
after the perfect example of Christ he 
can then 

"So live that when his summons comes to join 
The innumerable caravan, which moves 
To that mysterious realm, where each shall take 
His chamber in the silent halls of death, 



He goes not, like the quarry-slave at night, 
Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and 
soothed 

By an unfaltering trust, approach his grave 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams." 

A, 

UNDER THE OPEN SKIES, 

Alma Mae Light, '99. 
Every reader of Bryant's Thana- 
topsis is fully familiar with those oft 
repeated lines : 

"When thoughts 
Of the last bitter hour come like a blight 
Over thy spirit, and sad images 
Of the stern agony and shroud and pall, 
And breathless darkness and the narrow house. 
Make thee to shudder and grow sick at heart, 
Go forth under the open sky and list 
To Nature's teachings." 

And while it is unquestionably wise 
to be obedient to the injunctions of 
the poet under the circumstances he 
cites, it is equally proper and advisable 
to hold communion with Nature at 
other times. The sadness of the 
sepulchre should not be required t 
call forth from us our appreciation of 
Nature. She merits constant com- 
panionship. She is an admirable 
teacher during any hour, and he who 
fails to catch her lessons loses much 
of the best of life. 

To every soul at every moment 
there are splendid revelations to be 
made under the open skies, yet how 
many there are around us who are 
indifferent to these revelations. This 
indifference to Nature must necessarily 
show the lack of some great element 

"They tread through fields of speckled flowers 

As if they did not know 
Our Father made them beautiful 

Because he loves us so." 

the voice of Nature is to them but 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



13 



an empty sound. They never hear 
the brook "chatter" as Tennyson did. 
They join not in the sentiments of a 
job when he cries out for a voice from 
Nature saying, "Break forth into 
singing, ye mountains, O forests and 
every tree therein." 

In contrast with such, stand the 
singers of the ages God's messengers, 
the poets, who have come in closest 
touch with Nature; to them she has 
assumed a personality. Poets, how- 
ever, hold no monopoly on Nature. 
Her domains are open to all. She 
does not offer her riches only to the 
wise and learned, but she presents 
them to every one that will take them. 
She will as freely open her infinite 
book for perusal by as simple and 
childlike a character as Fishin' Jimmy 
of whom Annie Trumbull Slosson so 
interestingly tells, as for the entertain- 
ment and profit of a Shakespeare. 
One knows full well where all the 
flowers grow and is conversant with 
the haunts and habits of the animals 
and fishes, while the other "finds 
tongues in trees, books in the running 
brooks, sermons in stones, and good 
in everything." 

Every one should delight in his 
ability to take part in out-of-door life, 
should rejoice in his opportunity to 
"go forth under the open skies." 
Along with the pleasure he thereby 
receives, there enters something more 
ethereal, not the less real because it 
m ay be undefinable. This fresh 
delight in Nature has a world of 
S1 gnificance for any life, and blessed 
ls the man who has come to a genuine 
realization of it. 

Every one should assume such an 



attitude towards Nature that he may 
obtain the greatest rewards. "For the 
soul to apprehend all that Nature 
contains of meaning, there must be 
present not only the eye keenly 
observing and tenderly sensitive to 
natural beauty, but behind this there 
must be a heart feeling alive to all 
that is most affecting in human life, 
sentiment, and destiny ! There is in 
Nature just as much, or as little, as 
the soul of each can see in her." 

"To him who in the love of Nature holds 
Cominurjion with her visible forms she speaks 
A various language." 

Of all Nature's children the flowers 
are the most delicate and exquisite in 
their forms and coloring. In realizing 
the truth of the poet's words, their 
beauty seems to speak the most to the 
Nature-loving soul. They seem to 
respond to the moods of their student 
and reflect love and sympathy from 
their tender petals. Flowers have an 
expression of countenance as much as 
men or animals. Some seem to smile, 
some have a sad expression; some are 
pensive and diffident; others, again, 
are plain, honest, and upright, like the 
broad-faced sunflower and the holly- 
hock. 

Flowers have the power to become 
the smiling sympathizers of the bride, 
and to wreathe with beauty the coffin 
and the grave. Flowers represent the 
poetical side of human existence; they 
are the exponents of love and trust. 

Why is it that the eye kindles with 
delight at the sight of beautiful 
flowers ? These fairy beauties of the 
woods and gardens are universally 
cherished, in all lands, alike by the 
affluent and the poor, the cultivated 
and the rude How lavishly has the 



14 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Creator enriched the earth with floral 
grace and beauty and laden the atmos- 
phere with their fragrant perfume. 

The eye wearies of the magnificent 
hues of highly cultivated plants and 
delights itself by way of change in 
some of the most common weeds of 
our fields. The dandelion, a very per- 
sistent weed, is one of the brightest, 
gayest flowers we have, and really is 
u a thing of beauty" but not "a joy 
forever." 

Another very common and trouble- 
some weed is the wild carrot, a most 
magnificent flower when examined 
closely. The head is composed of 
smaller heads, and each small head 
made up of numerous pure, white 
flowers. It surely is an emblem of 
purity and loveliness. 

Let us look more charitably upon 
these despised children of Nature and 
realize their beauty and symbolism. 
If these were not so common, we 
would consider them most beautiful, 
but, because we see so much of them 
they are looked down upon; just so it 
is with the little daily duties — the 
common duties of life. Because they 
are so common we are apt to wish to 
do something more grand, but these 
little duties must be performed as they 
help to form the grand things. Let 
us take a lesson from these common 
flowers of the field and be content to 
fill our lot wherever it may be cast 
and in whatever circumstances. 

Not the least among the beauties to 
be found under the open skies is the 
form and coloring of Nature. With 
what endless variety of form and rich 
coloring is the kingdom of Flora 
bedecked and arrayed. 



Again, if we examine the brig nt 
bow of Iris painted on the heavens by 
the sunbeams that break through tb' 
parting storm clouds, no matter how 
closely we scan it, we shall not be able 
to determine where the colors beo 
or end. As in this arch the blue 
gradually passes over into the green 
and the green in turn merges insen 
sibly into a yellow, even thus we find 
in the countless forms in which Natun 
delights, the most delicate gradation 
the most gradual transitions. We 
agree that everything in Nature, fron 
the highest form to the lowest, is 
perfect. But do we ever think how 
much of this perfection is due to color? 
Color is such a beneficial element in 
the material creation, and Natur 
knows so well how to use it that sh 
never defines and contrasts color 
sharply and suddenly, but mingle 
and softens the tones in all shades 
as to give rest to the eye. The feel- 
ings of repose that steal over us when 
we gaze at one of Nature's beautiful 
pictures is due to her tact in the 
of colors. Nature would be very dull 
and uninteresting without the varying 
tints and colors, and the beauty ex- 
pressed by its harmonious gradations, 
But this is just what makes Nature all 
the more attractive, for color is always 
associated with joy. 

Let us remember what some one 
has sai 1, that "the highest way 
which Nature ministers to the sou 
and spirit of man is when it becom e 
to him a symbol translucent with tfi 
light of the moral world! AH ilk 
that would have mdody and liarrnou) 
must grow familiar with her-— 111 
get out under the open skies and 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



*5 



to the teachings to be heard there and 
there alone. And these teachings are 
unnumbered ! Purity of purpose is 
preached, calmness of conduct is 
encouraged, and lofty conception of 
life is impressed. A thoughtful con- 
sideration of the attitude of the things 
to be revealed under the open skies 
will lead us to realize the force of 
Jonathan Edwards's remark, "Surely 
there is something in the unruffled 
calm of Nature that overawes our 
little anxieties and doubts; the sight 
of the deep blue sky and the clustering 
stars above seems to impart a quiet to 
the mind." Unquestionably, we shall 
act wisely, then, if we obey the 
splendid counsel that N. P. Willis 
gave to his class-mates on his departure 
from Yale College when he advised — 

"When life 
Hath half become a-wearisome and hope 
Thirsts for serener water, go abroad 
Upon the paths of Nature, and when all 
Its voices whisper, and its silent things 
Are breathing the deep beauty of the world, 
Kneel at its simple altar, and the God 
Who hath the living waters shall be there," 

WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GEN- 
tlemen or ladies to travel for responsible, 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses. Posi- 
tion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago. 



L , 



Prof, in Astronomy. — "Mr 
what causes eclipses ?" 

Mr. L,. — "Why they are caused 

by the sun coming between the earth 
and the moon." 



Somebody has discovered that the 
Duke of Wellington once wrote poetry. 
There is nothing strange about this 
fact. It would have been stranger had 
the Duke not made a fool of himself 
in this way, as everybody else does, at 
one time or another. . 



WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GEN- 
tlemen or ladies to travel for responsible, 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses. Posi- 
tion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago. 

TEACHERS. 

Union Teachers' Agencies of America. 

REV. L. D. BASS, D. D., MANAGER. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, 
La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C, 
San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, 111., St. 
Louis, Mo., and Denver, Colo. 

There are thousands of positions to be filled. 
We had over 8,000 vacancies last season. Un 
surpassed facilities for placing teachers in any 
part of the U. S. or Canada. One fee registers 
in nine offices. More vacancies than teachers. 

Address all Applications to Pittsburg, Pa. 



THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS, 

R, A, MAULFAIR, Gen, Agi 
annVille, PA. 

ALL THE LATEST AND BEST POLICIES ISSUED. 



Rensselaer 



Polytechnic^' 
Institute, 



Troy, N.Y. 



Lrcal examinm inns provided for. Send for a Catalogue 



TEACHERS WAHTEDI 

Over 4,000 vacancies — several times as many vacancies as members. Must have more mem- 
t)ers - Several plans : two plans give free registration ; one plan GUARANTEES position. Ten 
Cen ts pays for book containing plans, and a $500.00 love story of college days. No charge to 
employers for recommending teachers. 



Southern Teachers' Bureau, 

s - *v. cor. Main &3d St. Louisville.Ky 



\Rev. Dr. O. M. Sutton, A.fl , f 

j President and Manager. \ 



Suttons' Teachers' Bureau, 

69-71 Dearborn st. Chicago, 111. 



Northern vacancies Chicago Office, Southern vacancies Louisville Office. One fee 

registers in both offices. 



i6 



E, B, MARSHALL, M.D, 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

J, R, McCAULEY, 



DAILY MEAT MARKET 



COOI) MEAT— LOW PRICES. 



HARRY ZIMMERMAN, D,D,S„ 
DENTAL ROOMS, 

72 West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 



JACOB SARGENT, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR. 

18 and 20 West flain St., ANNVILLE. 



WILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, ANNVILLE, PA. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY. 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS 

One door West Penn'a. House, Annvilk 

M. H. SHAUD, 

—DEALER IN — 

Gold Watches and Jetueby, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYSTEB 
AND CBKAM. HNNVILtUE, PR, 



F, W. FROST, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



KREIDER & CO,, 



H, H. KREIDER. 
JNO. E. HERR. 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 



Shenk & Kinports, 

ANNVILLE, PA, 
Dealers in DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 
and Ladies' Dress Goods, 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home 
made, Ingrain, and Brussels Carpets. You 
buy cheaper from us than away from home, 
and have a large stock to select from. 



Hard & Soft Coal ( Grain, Seeds, Salt & Feed, If you want to Buy a Hat Right, and a Fight Hat, 

or anything in 



Office: Railroad St., near Depot. 
Telephone Connection. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



QNOWFLAKE printing house, 

^ A. C, M. HIESTER, Prop. 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

00 T0 Erb & Craumer 



H, S, WOLF. 



FINE JOB PRINTING 

North White Oak Street, ANNVILLE, PA, Ei ghth and Cu mb, St s„ LEBANON ^ 

DESIGNING, WOOD ENGRAVING 

PHOTOENGRAVING, 

Penn'a, Engraving Con 

114420 S, 7th St., PHILADELPHIA. 

COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



DEALER IN 

Green Groceries and Confectioneries, 

RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
FURNITURE & UNDERTAKING, 

West Main St, ANNVILLE, PA, 

I860. 1885. 

J, HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT, 

S. W, Comer 8th and Willow, LEBANON. 

4®=ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



Theo. Leonhardt & Son. 

LITHOGRAPHERS. 

5th and Library Sts„ PHILA 

Diplomas and Certificates of Membership 
Also Commercial Work our 

Specialty- 




A G. SPALDING & Bros 

The Name the Guarantee. 

Outfitters to all the leading 
colleges, athletic clubs, 
and preparatory 
schools. 

Every requisite for Athletic sports 
and pastimes, 

Spalding's 
Base Ball 
Supplies. 

Managers should send for samples and special 
rates on uniforms and supplies before pur- 
chasing. Every facility for the best value 
at the least cost. 

Tennis, Golf, Cricket, Track and Field 
Supplies, and Gymnasium Supplies. 

Catalogue Free. 

Spalding's Athletic Liibvavy contains 
books on every form of athletic sport. Pub- 
lished monthly. Price 10 cents. 

TJ4B SPflliDIfiO BlCYCIiE 

Strong, light, easy running. Perfection of 
mechanical skill. 

o G, Spalding & Bros, 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA, 



80 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 



Patents 



mm 



TSAUc fHARKSt 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS Ac 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, whether an invention is 
probably patentable. Communications strictly 
confidential. Oldest agency for securing patents 
in America. We have a Washington office. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice iu the 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
say scientific journal, weekly, terms 93.00 a year ; 
(1.50 six months. Specimen copies and HAND 
Book ON Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway, Mew York. 



L. LKMBEBCEU. 



FRANK GLEIM. 



LEMBERGER & CO., 
DRUGGISTS and PHARMACISTS. 

9th and Cumberland Sts.. LEBANON, PA. 

Our claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of first importance— ACCURACY. 



Translations 

Liiteral Interlinear, 
67 Volumes. 

Dictionaries 

German, preneh, 
Italian, Spanish, 
Ltatin and Greek. 



Arthur Hinds & Co., 

4 Cooper Institute. NEW YORK. 



The Miller Organ 



Is the Finest and Best 
Organ Made. 



Sold all over the world 
upon its merits alone. 



SPECIAL 

INDUCEMENTS 

To Churches, Sunday 
Schools and Ministers. 



Write to us and get our 
prices and terms. 
Catalogue, etc., free. 



MILLER ORGAN CO., 

JUEBAJNLOf*, PA. 




RISE & GATES, 

PHOTO ARTISTS 

142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON. 



Special Inducements To Students. 



Superior Advantages, Most Reasonable Rates 

fff 

Iiebanon Valley College, ] 

FOUNDED 1866. 

Fop Iiadies and Gentlemen. 

1. Thirty-second Year Opened with Double the Attendance of 
last Year. 

Three Commodious Buildings \ Full Classical, Scientific 
and Musical Courses. 

2. An able Faculty ; High Standard ; Progressive Methods ; and a 
Well-selected Library. 

3. Environments of the Most Helpful Character in Social, Moral 
and Religious Life. 

4. A Fine Campus of about Ten Acres for Athletic Sports, and a 
well-equipped Gymnasium. 

Winter Term begins January 3d } Spring Term, March 28, 1898, 

ADDRESS. REV H y RQgp pj, p p res j dent 

Annville, Pa. 



Webster's 
International 
Dictionary 

The One Great Standard Authority, 

So writes Hon. D. J. Brewer, 
Justice TJ. S. Supreme Court. 

Successor of the 
"Unabridged." 



The Standard 

of the U. S. Gov't Printing 
Office, the U. S. Supreme 
Court, all the State Supreme 
Courts, and of nearly all the 
Schoolbooks. 

Warmly 
Commended 

by College Presidents, State 
Superintendents of Schools, 
and other Educators almost 
without number. 

THE BEST FOR PRACTICAL USE. 

It Is easy to find the word wanted. 
It is easy to ascertain the pronunciation. 
It is easy to trace the growth of a word. 
It is easy to learn what a word means. 

The Pennsylvania School Journal says: 

—The International Webster is a treasure house 
of universal knowledge to which all the world, in 
all its ages, has made contribution, and any one 
of us may have it at his elDow. 

fl^Specimen pages sent on application to 
G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, 
Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 



A.C. Zimmerman, 



DEHUER Ifl 





758 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 



Stephen Hubertis, 
Blank Book Manufacturer 

AND JOB BOOK BINDER, 



. . . RULING, 
NUMBERING, 



WIRE .... 
STITCHING. 



1125 and 1127 North Third St„ 
HARRISBURG, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOORS IP STITIIIfiT. 

22 East Main St, ANNVILLE 



Oat» Shelves are constantly Silled uaith 
1«HW, SHCOND-flAfiD and SHEliF WOHJM 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE TEXT SOCKS. 



TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

STATIOflE^Y, 
Wall PapetMtVindou* Shades. 



A Selected Stock of the LATEST STYLES OF WALL 
PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

We Buy, Sell, and Exchange Old 
and New Text Books. 

Teachers' 
Co-operative Association 

ESTABLISHED IN 1884. 
POSITIONS FILLED, 4,ooo. 



101 The Auditorium Building, 
CHICAGO, ILL 

Seeks Teachers who are ambitious for advance- 
ment rather than those without positions. 



UNITED BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. FUNK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 



TEXT AftD HHFH^EJICE BOOKS. 

Supplied to students at the lowest figures. Special 
facilities for furnishing books to 

Prices will be quoted on any list of books submitted. 
Any book in the market, either American or foreign, can 
be supplied. The latest publications received as issued. 
General catalogue furnished on application. The 

1HTE3HATIOT1HU BIBHES 

Are now the best to be had. Text, Reference and Teach- 
ers' editions in a great variety of styles at the lowest 
prices. New ' Helps" prepared especially for this line 
by both American and English scholars. Send for 
catalogue. 4^Agents w anted for our 

J4EW SEUP EXPUAfSATORY TEACHERS' BIEUE. 

Liberal terns. Address, 

W. n. FUNK, Dayton, Ohio. 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIME TABLE— Dec. 1, 1897. 



Leave 



Winchester 

Martinsbnrg 

Hagerstown 

Greencastle 

Mercersburg 

Chambersburg. . . 

Waynesboro 

Shippensburg.... 

Newville 

Carlisle 

Mechanicsburg. . 

Dillsburg 

Ar. Harrisburg . . 



Ar. Philadelphia. 

" New York 

" Baltimore 



|A. M. 



6 45 

7 07 



7 30 
7 00 

7 50 

8 07 
8 26 
8 45 



9 00 
P.M. 

11 18 
2 13 

12 40 
P. M. 



fA. M. 

7 30 

8 15 

9 00 
9 22 

8 30 

9 45 



10 05 
10 23 

10 45 

11 06 



li:25 
P. M. 
3 00 
5 53 
3 11 
P. M. 



fA. M, 



11 35 

12 20 
12 42 

11 10 
1 05 

12 15 
1 24 

1 41 

2 05 
2 27 

1 40 

2 45 
P. M. 

5 47 
8 23 

6 00 
P. M. 



|P. M. 

2 30 

3 17 

4 05 

4 28 

3 30 

5 00 

4 00 

6 20 

5 38 

6 02 
6 25 

5 10 

6 4a 
P. M. 
10 20 

3 53 
9 45 
P. M. 



10 



*P. M. 



10 15 
10 37 



11 00 



11 20 

11 37 

12 00 
12 23 



12 45 

A. M. 
4 30 
7 33 
6 20 
A. M. 



102 



7 30 
7 52 



8 15 



8 35 

8 54 

9 17 
9 40 



10 00 
P.M. 
12 50 
3 30 
12 43 
P. M. 

Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg 
daily, except Sunday, at 5.50 a, m., 7.05 a. m., 12.20 p. m , 
3.45 p. m. and 9.10 p. m., and from Mechanicsburg at 6 14 
a. m., 7.29 a. in., 9.39 a. m., 12.46 p. m., 4.10 p. m., 5.35 p. 
m., and 9.35 p. m., stopping at 2d street, Harrisburg, to 
let off passenger*. 

Train No. 10 runs daily between Harrisburg and Hag- 
erstown. 

? No. 102 Sunday only. 

* Daily. f Daily except Snnday. 



Leave 



p. M. 
11 50 
i 40 
11 20 

It A. M. 

Harrisburg | 5 00 

Dillsburg* 



Baltimore 

New York 

Philadelphia , 



Mechanicsburg. . . 

Carlisle 

Newville 

Shippensburg 

Waynesboro 

Chambersburg 

Mercersburg 

Greencastle 

Hagerstown 

Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester. . . 



5 19 

5 40 
04 

6 23 



6 43 
8 10 

7 10 

7 32 

8 24 

9 10 
A.M. 



A.'M. 
4 55 
12 05 
4 30 
+A. M. 
7 55 



8 12 
8 36 

8 59 

9 16 
10 37 

9 35 
10 30 
10 02 

10 25 

11 25 

12 35 
P. M. 



A. M. 

8 50 



8 30 
fA. M. 

11 45 

12 40 
12 05 
12 30 
12 52 

1 11 

2 10 
1 33 



2 00 
2 25 




Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily, ex- 
cept Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at 
9.35 a. m., 2.00 p. m., 5.25 p. m., 6.25 p. m. aud 10.55 p. m„ 
also for Mechanicsburg, Dillsburg and intermediate sta- 
tions at 8.22 a. m. All the above trains will stop at Sec- 
ond street, Harrisburg, to take on passengers. 

No. 9 runs daily between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 
I No. 103 Sunday onlv. • Dailv. 

f Daily except Sunday. 

3 On Sundays will leave Philadelphia at 4.30 p. m. 

Pullman parlor cars and through coaches between Hag- 
erstown and Philadelphia on trains 2 and 9 and through 
coaches between Winchester and Philadelphia on trains 
4 and 7. 

H. A. Riddle, J. F. Boyd, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Supt. 



Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler. 

CLUB, COLLEGE I FRATERNITY 
EMBLEMS. WATCHES, DIAM> 
ONDS, JEWELRY, X X X % 

198 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates Furnished' 



The College Forum. 

a monthly journal devoted to the interests of 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ITS STUDENTS AND FRIENDS. 

.XI. No. 2. ANNVILLE, PA., FEBRUAKY, 1898. Whole No. 108. 



GIVE US MEN, 

God give us men ! A time like this demands 
Strong minds, great hearts, true faith, and 

ready hands — 
Men whom the lust of office will not kill ; 

Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy ; 
Men who possess opinions and a will ; 

Men who have honor ; men w 7 ho will not lie ; 
Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog ; 
In public duty and in private thinking. 

—J. G. Holland. 

MAKING THE MOST OF SELF. 

That is the privilege, that is the re- 
sponsibility of every young person, 
here is no tragedy like that of a 
asted life, or a life turned to base 
or ignoble ends. It is a good thing 
early in life to take a true look to self, 
to find out one's make up, his r eeds 
and capabilities, then to determine to 
make the most of all his powers. Our 
faculties are the channels thro' which 
a U the good of the world is seeking to 
enter our lives. The object of every 
lle should be to get all the richness, 
sweetness, goodness and power into 
life that is possible ; the method is 
trough trained faculties. Hence the 
need of cultivating our faculties ; 
training them for high and noble ends. 
The roots of our being need nourish- 
ln §o our faculties need to be strength- 
eil ed. Whatever is good should be 
n °urished ; whatever is bad should be 



suppressed. Not a power of our be- 
ing should go to waste ; every faculty 
should be trained to do its utmost and 
reach its highest perfection. The 
noblest sight this world offers is a 
young person inspired with the pur- 
pose of making the most of himself, — 
mentally, morally, spiritually and in 
practical usefulness. Alas, that there 
are so many who seem not to care 
what they are or what they become ; 
who have grasped nothing of the true 
thought of life. They are men in 
stature, but babes in the comprehen- 
sion of life's purposes. A cigar, a 
flirtation, a suit of clothes, low amuse- 
ments, and just enough work to attain 
these if they may not be had without 
work — this seems to be the aim of 
many young people. What a sight 
for "the spirits of the wise sitting in 
clouds to laugh at." Can such things 
introduce to manhood and manly 
duties? Never! Even if burdens 
and the necessities of life drive him 
later to things more serious and sober, 
he can only stumble and halt as he 
passes through life. The sad thing is 
to begin life with low conceptions. 
Nobility of character is within the 
reach of all. High ideals and a de- 
termined purpose will press toward 
the goal. We had better be born 
blind than fail to see the glory of life. 



iS 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



We should train our minds to think 
nobly and worthily, to serve our needs 
readily and faithfully. In our social 
relations we should be the best friend ; 
in our civic duties, the best citizen ; 
in our moral and religious obligations, 
the best Christian. We should deepen 
and classify our sense of God and 
communion with him. We may 
think his thoughts after him. To 
make the most of self is to put life to 
its best and noblest use. 

B. F. Daugherty. 

a; 

SOCIAL ETHICS, 

Social ethics concerns the entire 
man — the body, temperament, reason, 
judgment, emotions, conscience, con- 
versation, friendship, commerce, and 
all the affectional, social, civic and 
moral elements in him. The business 
of life is not merely the control of 
natural law, but how to make the most 
and best of the social relatives. Man 
stands in the center of diversified cir- 
cles which comprise the home, the 
school, the community, and the 
business world. In order to attain the 
ends of our ambition we must use our 
fellow men as instruments, and in 
turn be used by them. Skill in getting 
on with men is the true test of man- 
hood. To be able to analyze the 
underlying motives, and to discern 
the impulses in men and skill in 
calling forth their best qualities ; to 
attain our personal ends in life without 
injury to our brother man, is to be a 
true gentleman and a true lady in the 
highest sense of the term. This, how- 
ever, does not imply that one must 
make concessions to evil-doers and 



wrong-doing in order to be in harrrio 
ious relations with all men. One 
the dangers of our age is, a tender] 
to conciliate wrong and smooth ov 
wickedness through a false sense 
charity. For a man to live so that 
his friends can truthfully write on his 
tombstone, "He never had an enemy;' 
means, either, that he was a mere 
cipher in the world or accommodated 
himself to the popular tide regardless 
of integrity or honor. 

Not until the fatherhood of God a- 
the brotherhood of man have become 
incarnated in society and in institu- 
tions will right-living toward all me 
become an actuality. 

The test of manhood is not outer 
polish but inner skill in mastering 
ones' self. It is a mistaken idea that 
many you :g men have : that the 
sporting of a mustache and the parting 
of the hair in the middle, are evidences 
of manliness. The world is frill of 
dudes who blunder in their meeting 
with their fellows : who cannot con- 
verse without marring, depressing or 
discouraging others. 

While the schools teach the tongue 
the art of speaking correctly, and the 
mind skill in thinking logically, they 
should not overlook the importance of 
teaching the study of men, and hov 
to use the social and industrial itnpul se 
Through speech and social contac 
man can fill the sky of his environment 
with storm, or he can sweep all clouds 
from the social horizon. Every i fl 
vidual carries within him the p°^ tr 
to bless or to blight. The weigh 1 < 
goodness in us should be such tfc 
our mere presence in society looks th 
best that is in others, while we sweet* 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



J 9 



their bitter feelings and surround them 
with an atmosphere of sympathy. 

PSYCHOLOGY IN RELATION TO ED^ 
UCATION, 



ALLEN BAER, '98. 

Psychology is in a peculiar sense 
closely related to education. The 
very nature of this science is indica- 
tive of its influence over the indi- 
vidual, who has become acquainted 
with its laws and principles. Psy- 
chology as a science stands pre-emi- 
nently above all others. "There is in 
nature a gradually ascending series. 
We pass from the observation and 
study of the mineral to the forms of 
vegetable life, from the plant to the 
insect and thence to the animal and 
from the animal, to man, the highest 
type animated existence on the earth." 
We are conscious that in this series 
there is a progression of rank and dig- 
nity. But it is only when we draw 
away from all these, to the intelli- 
gence that is within man, that we 
stand upon the summit and overlook 
the great field of science. Psychology 
has to deal exclusively with the mind. 
Its aim is to ascertain the laws and 
dental operations of the mind, — not 
°nly of our own but of others as well. 
Its aim will at once show its superior- 
ly- While the other sciences are im- 
portant, and afford us much profit and 
Pleasure in their study, yet there is no 
science which is so interesting and in- 
structive to the student as the science 
Jhich treats of his own personality. 
ls truly the science of man himself. 
* great motto is "Man know thyself." 
ls will at once reveal its true na- 



ture, and separate it from all other 
sciences. In the physical sciences the 
facts may be, and usually are scattered 
over the entire world, and may not be 
personally accessible, and yet that 
completeness of observation may be 
necessary in order to deduce correct 
science. But in psychology the ob- 
server has within himself the elements 
which he seeks to discover. The facts 
which he seeks to discover are those 
of his own conscience. Thus it can 
readily be seen that psychology must 
of necessity constitute the basis of all 
the other sciences, as such it must be 
and is a practical science seeking to 
educate us so as to control and guide 
our intellectual faculties in order to 
influence us in exercising our mental 
powers in harmony with the inherent 
principles which are common to all 
rational beings. But the importance 
of psychology will only be appreciated 
when we consider it in its relations to 
the other sciences, and especially in 
its relation to the science of education. 
Education has to deal principally with 
the mind. It is not only an accumu- 
lation of facts and experiences but 
also a development of the student's 
mind, a drawing out of the latent 
powers of his intelligence. The true 
teacher must be at once a logician, 
a critic, a moralist and a legislator. 
His sphere is too broad to permit him 
to neglect any of these essential ele- 
ments. His fundamental work is to 
direct thought and in order to do this 
intelligently, the teacher must be well 
acquainted with the laws of thought. 
He must know how to present truths 
to the student's mind so as to insure 
the most lasting impressions. 



20 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The true mission of education is to 
train every pupil as an individual, to 
develop not only some particular fac- 
ulty, but so far as is possible every 
one of his faculties, to liberate all the 
powers of the mind within him. He 
should be educated not only so as to 
be able to make a respectable living, 
but above all to be a man. Education 
should produce the finest possible 
specimens of manhood and woman- 
hood. As the horticulturist always 
seeks to produce the finest kind of 
fruits and flowers, so the true teacher 
seeks to produce the best students. 
In order to accomplish this success- 
fully, our education must be liberal as 
well as scientific. In educating, there 
always has been and still is, a ten- 
dency to lean too much on textbooks. 
The student's education should be 
such as to enable him to make, as 
much as is possible, his own textbooks 
as he progresses and to deprive teacher 
and pupil of these props of indolence. 
The student should be taught to think 
for himself, to make original investi- 
gations and not be the slave of text- 
books. The history of education in 
England has proven to us what a great 
evil it is to the progress of education, 
to hinder and discourage original 
thinking on the part of the student. 
This is a decidedly practical age and 
the only education which will be rec- 
ognized by the world is a practical 
one, and not one of textbooks merely. 
The world has no need for men who 
cannot apply what they know. Why 
is Mr. Edison the great inventor he 
is? It is not because he lias a more 
liberal education than many other 
men have, for he was not any more 



result 



favored by circumstances than we 
In fact every student in L. V. C. 
better advantages than he had in 
youth. But his greatness is the 
of his ability to apply his knowledge 
He is not content when he astonis 
the entire civilized world with one 
his wonderful discoveries, but e 
discovery is the stepping stone to 
other. Many people evade answering 
such questions by claiming that ver 
few men have the ability to beco 
truly great, and this is quite true u 
less they have been educated to 
original thinking. Many a man 
genius is in a dormant state beca 
he has not the courage to assert h 
views, and consequently he never ris 
to more than ordinary notice. M 
at their best see and hear only w 
their minds are prepared to hear an 
see. Truly said Christ, the great 
of all teachers : "They have eyes 
see and see not, and ears to hear an 
hear not." It is then the teache 
primary duty to train the minds 
his pupils to see and hear rightly, an 
the only way he can do this is to b 
thoroughly conversant with the s 
ence of the mind, for how can a teach 
er guide the minds of his pupils mil 
he himself understands the laws an 
operations of the mind ? Or in oth 
words, "How can the blind lead th 
blind ?" 

a; 

LINCOLN. 



On February 12, five States, viz : 
Minnesota, Illinois, Washington, Ne v 
York and New Jersey, will celebrate 
the birth of one of America's noble* 1 
sons, Abraham Lincoln, He * ll<J 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



21 



ided our noble ship of state through 
e crimson seas of toil and strife, 
hould ever be held near and dear to 
he hearts of all true Americans. 

While the waves sought its life, it 
was he who stood nobly at the helm 
and saved it from the rock of fate, 
when the threatening dangers seemed 
to overwhelm it during that famous 
voyage of four long years. It was he 
who kept strong courage and when he 
:eered the gallant ship into the harbor 
of safety, the whole nation lisped the 
name of "Lincoln," and hailed him 
ith joyous honors. History has ever 
nown the great deed he accomplished 
for freedom's sake. He was the 
champion of liberty, the upholder of 
right, and the disseminator of justice. 
The emancipation of the slaves is the 
most appropriate monument that can 
be raised to his memory. For the 
clouds which wrapped the hour of 
that brave act shall serve but to 
brighten all our future days. 



br 

I. "For a thousand years no king 
I to Christendom has shown such great- 
| n ess, or given so high a type of manly 
virtue. ' ' _ Theodore Parker. 



TRIBUTES TO WASHINGTON, 



2 - "More than any other individual 
an d as much as to one individual was 
Possible, has he contributed to found 

ls our wide-spreading empire, and to 
|j 1Ve to tlie western world indepen- 
dence and freedom !» 

— Chief Justice Marshall. 

3- "Nature made him great, — he 
lde himself virtuous." 



4 "His highest ambition, the hap- 
piness of mankind ; 
His noblest victory, the con- 
quest of himself." 

5. "To add brightness to the sun, 
or glory to the name of Washington 
is alike impossible. Let none attempt 
it. In solemn awe pronounce the 
name and in its naked, deathless splen- 
dor leave it shining on." 

— Abraham Lincoln. 

6. "George Washington, the brave, 
the wise, the good. Supreme in war, 
in council, and in peace. Washing- 
ton, valiant, without ambition ; dis- 
creet, without fear ; confident, without 
presumption." 

— Dr. Andrezv Lee. 

7. "Let him who looks for a mon- 
ument to Washington look around the 
United States. Your freedom, your 
independence, your national power, 
your prosperity, and your prodigious, 
growth are a monument to him." 

— Kossuth. 

8. "More than all and above all, 
Washington was master of himself. 
It' there be one quality more than an- 
odic r in his character which may ex- 
ercise a useful control over the men 
of the present hour, it is the total dis- 
regard of self when in the most ele- 
vated positions for influence and ex- 
ample." 

— Charles Francis Adams. 

9. "Just honor to Washington can 
only be rendered by observing his pre- 
cepts and imitating his example." 

— Robert C. IVinthi'op. 

Miss K. uses a tin horn for a bur- 
glar alarm. 



22 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



WASHINGTON. 

Rome had its Caesar, great and brave, but stain 

was on his wreath ; 
He lived the heartless conqueror, and died the 

tyrant's death. 
France had its Eagle ; but his wings ; though 

lofty they mighty soar, 
Were spread in false ambitious flight and dipped 

in murder's gore. 

Those hero-gods whosi mighty sway would fain 

have chained the waves. 
Who flashed their blades with tiger zeal to make 

a world of slaves, 
Who, though their kindred barred the path, 

still fiercely waded on, — 
Oh where shall be their glory by the side of 

Washington ? 

He fought, but not with love of strife ; he 

struck but to defend ; 
And ere he turned a people's foe, he sought to 

be a friend. 

He strove to keep his country's right by Rea- 
son's gentle word, 

And sighed when fell Injustice threw the chal- 
lenge, sword to sword. 

He stood, the firm, the calm, the wise, the 

patriot and sage ; 
He showed no deep avenging hate, no burst of 

despot rage ; 
He stood for liberty and truth ; and dauntlessly 

led on, 

Till shouts of victory gave forth the name of 
Washington. 

He saved his land, but did not lay his soldier 

trappings down 
To change them for the regal vest and don a 

kingly crown ; 
Fame was too earnest in her joy, too proud of 

such a son, 

To let a robe and title mask a noble Washing- 
ton. — Eliza Cook. 

A little boy who had been used to 
receiving his elder brother's old toys 
and clothes, recently asked : ''Ma, 
shall I have to marry his widow when 
he dies?" 

Infanticide — shaving the average 
student's mustache. 



OUR ALUMNI 

The editor of this department woul 
be pleased to hear from each alumn 
Can we not have a word from you no 
and then. 

Rev. Harry Boyer, '97, reports a 
large number of accessions to his 
church at Dover, York county, p- 
Rev. Mr. Boyer is not married as was 
reported in our last issue. 

Rev. J. G. Johnston, Ph.D., D.D, 
'76, has moved from Port Richmond, 
N. Y., to Bloomfield, N. J., where h 
is preaching the Word. 

Rev. W. H. Washinger, A. M., '91, 
who preaches in the U. B. Church at 
Chambersburg, is engaged in holding 
special revival services. Thus far 
twenty have professed conversion. 

Hon. Milton H. Embich, of Boiling 
Springs, stopped at Annville on Jan, 
14th and gave the College a pleasant 
call. Mr. Embich is a member of the 
monument commission, which was at 
New York on the 2 2d to inspect the 
Hartranft monument, which was ac- 
cepted, and will be erected in the 
Capitol grounds at Harrisburg. 

PERSONALS, 

Adam Wier, '00, preached at Union 
Deposit on Sunday, 23d. 

H. Howard Hoy, '99, on January 
13th attended a banquet given at the 
Bolton House, of Harrisburg. 

A. J. Hoverter, of the surgical de- 
partment of the U. S. A., Fort $cW 
ler, N. Y., was a frequent visitor 
the College during his stay at 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



23 



Miss Mary Kreider, '99, was visiting 
her brother, in Philadelph, over Sun- 
day, January 9th. 

Pres. H. U. Roop filled the pulpit 
of the Salem U. B. Church, in Leba- 
non, on Sunday evening, January 23d. 

Miss Carrie Smith, professor of in- 
strumental music, on account of illness 
went home for a few days to recuper- 
te. 

Prof. Spaugler has moved from his 
late residence to the house vacated by 
Mr. Bomberger, on North College 
Avenue. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, filled the 
ulpit of Trinity U. B. Church, Leba- 
non, on January 9th, both morning 
and evening. 

Prof. Daugherty filled the pulpit of 
Trinity U. B. Church, Sunday morn- 
ing, January 16th, and Prof. Spangler 
in the evening. 

C. V. Clippinger, '99, and J. P. 
Batdorf, '99, went to Lebanon on Sun- 
day evening, January 16th, to hear 
Prof. Spangler preach. 

Dr. Roop made a business trip to 
Williamstown, Pa., during the latter 
P a rt of the week ending January 22. 
He reports the prospect for students 
good. 

Rev. H. L. Eichinger, our able elo- 
Mionist, entertained the P. O. S. of 
1 °f this town, at their public in- 
flation of officers on January 12th, 
several choice selections. 

MUSICAL COMMENTS, 

; - H. TJ. Roop, teacher of Voice 



Culture and Art, sang several solos in 
Salem U. B. Church last Sunday, Jan- 
uary 23d. 

We notice among the new students 
a number of voices which would do 
credit to a glee club, an admirable fea- 
ture of which the College is sadly in 
need. 

Miss Smith, of the music faculty, 
suffered from la grippe for several 
days. She recovered sufficient to 
make a short visit to her home for re- 
cuperation. 

The Philo Quartette has made rapid 
progress and will go out, and give an 
evening's entertainment any place 
within reach where their services may 
be desired. 

A new grand piano of the Decker 
make was placed in the Chapel a few 
weeks ago, by the Miller Organ Com- 
pany, of Lebanon. Also one of the 
Hallet & Davis Co., for one of the 
music rooms. 

Prof. Wilde, of our musical depart- 
ment, has been elected recently as or- 
ganist and choir master of the Christ 
Church Episcopal Cathedral, Reading, 
Pa. This is one of the most honored 
positions of the kind in the State and 
reflects credits upon our worthy pro- 
fessor. 

Drummer in town : (to four College 
girls, who are flirting with him) — 
"Ladies is that a kiss-me-quick smile." 

(Moral) — Don't flirt with strangers. 

Mark Twain and Bret Harte are the 
two American authors most popular 
in Germany. 



24 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The College Forum, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly 
throughout the college year by the Philokosmian 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College, 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

O. P. DeWitt, '9», Editor-in-Chief. 
Jay W. Yoe, '98. C. E. Snoke, '00. 

C. V. Cl.IPPINGER, '99. R. R. BUTTERWICK, '01. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, Business Manager. 

8. F. Daugherty, '00, Assistant Business Manager. 

Terms ; Twenty 'five cents a year, five cents a copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to 
all subscribers until an order is received for its dis' 
continuance, and until all arrearages have been paid, 



Address all communications, articles for publication, 
exchanges, etc., to W. G. Clippinger, Box 86, Ann- 
ville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second- 
class mail matter. 



EDITORIALS, 

This is the season of the school year 
when the student should put in his 
best efforts for hard study. More work 
can be done now than at any other 
time in the year, for the simple reason 
that there are fewer outside calls, and 
these are they which divert the stu- 
dent from sound work and the best 
intellectual development. Base ball, 
foot ball, bicycles, picnics are dead 
issues for the present. Each day 
should show results. Are you making 
good the opportunity ? 

* 

* * 

Just now the United States is at a 
loss to know just what to do with 
President Dole, the chief magistrate of 
the Hawaiian republic. He is enter- 
ing Washington and the reception 



committee cannot decide whether 
receive him with foreign honors, p 
his expenses and entertain him while 
here as was the case with L/i Hung 
Chang, or to permit him to wande 
about as he pleases and seek the ofj 
cers of the government as an ordina 
citizen does. The probability is that 
he will be allowed to sit in the Senate 
gallery with common people. Be that 
as it may, the cause he comes to pre 
sent to the American government is 
just one and merits serious considera- 
tion. Hawaiian trade is exceptionally 
large with the United States and th 
American flag has the preference in 
Pearl Harbor. The commercial stand- 
ing of San Francisco is very largely 
dependent upon Hawaiian trade. Tli 
is why San Francisco ranks so hig 
on the list of ports for American shij 
ping. This port, in 1890, received 
imports from Hawaii $12,500,00 
worth of goods. It is of the utmost 
consequence, therefore, that this trade 
should be conserved and extended. 



The question is often asked, "Wha 
constitutes a good student ?" Without 
attempting to define one we wish 
place before our readers a few of the 
requisites. 

A good student never has to 
watched or scolded by his teacher for 
bad lessons. He is never idle, for the 
days are not half long enough for hio 
to do what he wishes to do. He t> e 
lieves that that culture which does no* 
reach the heart is a failure, and there' 
fore he always seeks to do his best a 
whatever task he is assigned ; and 
a result for this hard labor he d ° e 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 



25 



n0 t worry for fear he may not pass. 
He studies not because he has to or to 
please his teacher, but because he 
loves to study and is anxious to learn 
all he can. He, however, believes in 
reciprocity as the law of life. We 
cannot expect much happiness or 
strength from our fellow men unless 
we give something in return. He also 
knows that the comfort of ease with- 
out toil is an allusion, and leads neith- 
er to the health of the body, the vigor 
of the mind, nor the welfare of the 
soul. He, therefore, learns and is an- 
xious to go on, not because his one 
object is to complete the course, grad- 
uate, and secure a diploma, but be- 
cause he is seeking after knowledge 
and truth for their own sakes. To 
the true student it is a solemn religi- 
ous duty to be always working, inces- 
santly learning, and ever striving to- 
wards higher and better ideals of life. 
Punctuality, neatness, obedience, re- 
spect, and kindness are his attributes ; 
which, coupled with a desire for know- 
ledge, the hope of future goo: 1 , a sense 
of honor and duty, make him a stu- 
dent in the truest sense of the word. 

NEWSY NOTES, 

Present college enrollment, 176. 
Sixteen new students -entered this 
term. 

Rev. J. P. Miller, D.D., Harrisburg, 
gave his first lecture on "Social Eth- 
lcs "inthe College Chapel on Wed- 
ne sday morning, Jan. 19. An abstract 
°f his lecture appears elsewhere in 
this issue. 

Rev. C. E. Hurlburt, superintendent 



of Philadelphia Bible Institute, was 
with us four days recently. He has 
been engaged by the authorities as 
lecturer on English Bible. Rev. Mr. 
Hurlburt won for himself many friends 
while here. The students are anxious- 
ly awaiting the time for his return. 

Thursday p. m. was a holiday at 
the College. Appropriate exercises 
were rendered in the morning at 11 
o'clock. In the afternoon Rev. M. F. 
Good spoke on "Christian Influence 
in College." Bishop Kephart gave 
one of his characteristic lectures. Mem- 
bers of the faculty and the Christian 
Associations also aided in making the 
program a success. Good attendance 
added to the interest of the occasion. 

On Sabbath evening, Jan. 9th Rev. 
S. J. Shoomkoof, of Sophia, Bulgaria, 
spoke in the U. B. Church. 

He told many interesting facts of 
his far-away country. The descrip- 
tion of his conversion to the Protes- 
tant faith through the preaching of 
some missionaries was most interest- 
ing. He has acquired the titles of 
of B. A., B.D. and Ph.D. He is now 
making some final visits before return- 
ing to his own country as a medical 
missionary. 

The third number on the Lecture 
Course was given Friday evening, Jan. 
21, by S. M. Spedon, the renowned 
chalk talker of New York City. The 
subject, " The Things We Laugh 
and Wonder At," was well handled, 
and delivered in a spicy and entertain- 
ing manner. His subject was full of 
information and received with ap- 
plause. He sketched, with ease, the 
familiar features of some of the prom- 



26 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



inent citizens and students. 

The next number on the course 
will be the Ransome Entertainers, a 
company that will not fail to please 
every one. They will be with us 
Feb. 1 8. 



A WILD PONY, OR THE CURIOSITIES 
OF SPACE. 



A STORY WITH A MORAL. 
It was a Sunday night. I had been 
out rather late and after the ethereal 
pleasures of a young lady's company, I 
was contemplating the more solid idea 
of a test in Geometry the next morn- 
ing, or perhaps the same morning. 
Suddenly without warning and to my 
great dismay I found myself being 
projected into space, there to go 
through the strangest experience of 
my life. At first I felt rather dizzy 
and partially unconscious, but upon 
gradually recovering my brilliant in- 
tellectual capacities, I perceived other 
bodies than myself. All about me 
was a jumble of moving and stationary 
objects. There were lines being pro- 
jected, triangles were turned over and 
over on their axis, (which looked very 
sharp), huge planes were whirling 
around, cutting everything with which 
they came in contact ; gigantic solids 
came tumbling by on their vertices 
bursting to pieces, as they struck 
something with unusual force, resolv- 
ing themselevs into dihedral and tri- 
hedral angles and lateral edges. Per- 
pendiculars were "galavanting" around 
and some of them, losing their balance 
and becoming oblique, vanished. Cir- 
cles rolled along silently, also poly- 
gons, which may have been circles 



but by going too rapidly had become 
the shape of a young man's bugg v 
wheels after a race on a rough road. 

All this was amazing to me and be- 
coming frightened I began to seriously 
consider the proposition of getting 
some place where these creatures did 
not exist. Well I started, and the 
first thing I knew I stumbled over a 
hateful truncated prism and falling 
headlong into a hexahedral angle be- 
came wedged fast. After struggling 
violently, I at last succeeded in ex- 
tricating myself and almost out of 
my wits with fear dashed on wildly, 
now stooping to avoid being bisected 
by a plane, now jumping a polyhe- 
dron, and then turning aside to avert 
the catastrophe of coming in contact 
with the ugly axis of some designing 
figure. But all this seemed in vain, 
for I now noticed that I was the cen- 
ter of attraction to all the inhabitants 
of this strange country. Mercy! I 
cried. "I don't care to have anything 
to do with you," a voice answered, 
all who come into this country must 
associate with us." "But what coun- 
try is it ?" I asked. "Mathematics," 
was the answer. I then saw a man 
sitting by the side of a pile of broken 
and damaged circles, polygons, and 
other misformed figures, which he was 
repairing. I inquired his name and 
and he told me Dr. of Mathematics. 
Then I asked if I was compelled to 
remain in that country, and he said 
"Yes," but that it was not best for me 
to wander around, but to stand still 
and observe and take some medicine 
for my nerves which he would g ive 
me. He then showed me two kinds- 
One was a liquid labeled "Instruction, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



27 



the other was in the shape of capsules 
marked "Tests," these he made him- 
self. I immediately took several doses 
of the Instruction, and a couple of 
tests. The latter were very bitter and 
the grimaces which I was compelled 
to make, caused the countenance of 
the Dr. to be covered with smiles of 
satisfaction. 

I asked him how all these figures 
came to be so mutilated. He told me 
(confidentially) they were the ones 
which Mr. Shroyerand Miss Maysilles 
had crippled through carelessness, and 
the ones Mr. Shroyer had in hand 
were in such a deplorable condition 
that he didn't know whether he could 
patch them up or not. 

I had now so far recovered from my 
fright that I could enjoy the comical 
scene of a little curly headed man 
going slowly 'round and 'round two 
perpendicular planes wondering which 
was the right and which the left dihe- 
dral angle. 

The Dr. examined him and decided 
that his brain had been affected by in- 
haling the fumes of an incommensur 
able ratio. A few doses of instruction 
set him right. Upon hearing a voice 
I turned and there at my side was a 
sphere, with a little head at the top 
and arms sticking out at the sides, I 
took a second look and lo ! it was 
Smith, the editor of the "Owl," so- 
liciting contributions for his paper. 

Shortly after this we saw a "pi" 
coming toward us, and as all college 
Ws are fond of this article, my curly 
he aded friend tackled it but alas ! he 
^ as disappointed. Like little Jack 
Hor ner he put in his thumb, and 
pUlled out a string of figures as 



long as his memory. This made him 
very "crusty" and he appeared desper- 
ately determined to empty the pi of 
contents. String after string of fig- 
ures he drew from within until the 
pile around almost covered him. Fin- 
ally he exhaustedly told the Dr. that 
he could not digest such "pi." The 
Dr. replied that it was an impossibility 
to devour it completely. Then he 
took a knife, called "Approximation," 
made of gold and silver in the ratio of 
3 1-7 : 1, and with it cut the "pi" and 
gave us a portion which agreed per- 
fectly. 

We now began to feel at home. 
The obstreperous figures became obe- 
dient and permitted us to draw them 
where we pleased, but we were still 
frightened at the comets of this place, 
of which there were two kinds the 
hyperbolis and the parabolis. They 
came whizzing apparently from no- 
where, and went anywhere. 

We also learned that this country 
contained other divisions which we 
hope some time to explore, but the 
atmosphere of these places is too rare 
for the present condition of our men- 
tal lungs, which must first be expand- 
ed by tests 

Suddenly I heard a loud clanging 
noise and Mr. Shroyer's voice saying : 
"Young fellow are you ever going to 
get up ; that's the second bell," — and 
behold this was all a drearn. 

L. E. C, '00. 

Little Willie, 
Pair of skates, 
Hole in the ice, 
Golden gates. 



28 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



PHILOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 

"Esse Quam Vider%" 

Ralph D. Rkider, 'oo, Editor. 
Messrs. Huntzberger and Kauffman 
joined our ranks recently. We extend 
a hearty welcome to each of these gen- 
tlemen upon entering, our ranks. 

The literary society, more than any 
other agency or influence, sets in mo- 
tion the self-activity and originality 
of the student. He is sure that he is 
on his ground, and as a consequence 
gains confidence and asserts his indi- 
vi iuality. He feels his responsibility 
and does his work in the best manner 
possible. It seems to us that society 
work is imperative and absolutely nec- 
essary during college life. 

In society work the entertaining 
features should be subordinated to a 
certain extent to the purely literary 
exercises. But declamation should 
receive its share of attention. It de- 
velops a taste for literature, and with 
music cultivates the aesthetic tastes of 
the student 

We are justified in claiming that 
our society is giving this subject prop- 
er attention. 

a; 

Y. M. C A. NOTES. 

On Saturday evening, January 8th, 
the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A . gave a so- 
cial to the students of the College. A 
very enjoyable time was spent. 

The 30th annual State Convention 
of the Association will be held at 
York, Pa., from Feb. 17-20, '98. Some 
of the best talent of the State will be 
present. Six Bible lessons will be 



given by Drs. Weston and Stifler. Ko 
member can afford to miss this con- 
vention. 

We expect a large delegation from 
our Association to be present, and feel 
assured that on their return they will 
have a greater desire to do more and 
better work for the Master. 

EXCHANGES. 

We are sorry to be compelled to say 
that some of our exchanges for January 
did not reach us. This, together with 
the fact that the present editor is 
serving the very beginning of his 
apprenticeship in the capacity of 
exchange editor, will very much 
restrict the space given to exchanges 
in this issue of the Forum. 

We sincerely hope that those who 
receive the Forum will kindly ac- 
knowledge the same with a copy of 
their own publication. The Forum 
is always glad to exchange with 
fellow-workers in the same field, to 
receive all just criticism, and to give 
such favorable criticism to others as 
we deem proper. 

When first I kissed sweet Margaret 

She blushed rose-red, 

And sternly said 
"You mustn't ! Stop !" 

Last night I kissed sweet Margaret, 

She blushed rose-red, 

But simply said 
"You mustn't stop." 

—Coup D' Etat. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



29 



ENGLAND'S RULERS, 



First William the Norman, then William his son, 
Henry, Stephen and Henry, then Richard and 
John, 

Next Henry the Third ; Edwards, one, two 
and three, 

And again, after Richard, three Henries we see, 
Two Edwards, third Richard, if rightly I guess, 
Two Henries, Sixth Edward, Queen Mary, 

Queen Bess ; 
Then Jamie the Scotchman, then Charles, whom 

they slew, 

But received after Cromwell, another Charles too 
Then James the Second ascended the throne, 
And good William and Mary together came on, 
Till, Anne, Georges four and fourth William 
all past, 

God sent England Victoria ; may she long be 
the last. — Selected. 

THE PHILOSOPHER. 

Never lose sight of an honorable 
enemy ; he will make a good friend. 

He who can take advice is some- 
times superior to him who can give it. 

The man who is above his business 
may one day find his business above 
him. 

To dread no eye and to suspect no 
tongue is the great prerogative of 
innocence. 

Modesty is to merit as shades to 
figures in a picture, giving it strength 
a nd beauty. 

The surest and shortest way to prove 
a work possible is strenuously to 
se t about it. 

Few men have the talent of dis- 
playing dignity without acquiring a 
hncture of coldness and contempt for 
others. 

It is one of the most promising 
■ r aits of human nature that heroic 



unselfishness always kindles the en- 
thusiasm of mankind. 

Reason requires culture to expand 
it. It resembles the fire concealed in 
the flint, which only shows itself when 
struck with a steel. 

Count your resources ; learn what 
you are not fit for, and give up wish- 
ing for it ; learn what you can do, and 
do it with all the energy at your com- 
mand. — Montreal Star. 



STUB ENDS OF THOUGHT, 



Poets love to wash their lines in 
tears. 

Friendship is solid gold ; love is fili- 
gree. 

A woman's smile is worth man's 
while. 

Orange blossoms sometimes grow 
on a widow's weeds. 

Some men's ambition never rise> 
above a torpid liver. 

We should not learn by trusting. 
Trust is too often a bitter teacher. 

One of the delights of heaven is 
looking upon death as an accomplish- 
ed fact. 

What we think we are some people 
know we are not, and what we know 
we are not some other people think 
we are. 

X 

First Senior — "What noise is that ?" 

Second Senior — "A Junior orating. 
Prof. h. told him, "the hound is 
nature's model orator." — Ex. 



3° 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY. 



TRUE FICTION. 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION. 

Rev. H. U. Roop, A. M., Ph. D., President, 
Professor of Philosophy, Pedagogy and Oratory. 

John E. Lehman, A. M., 
Professor ot Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Rev. James T. Spangler, A. M., B. D., 
Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

H. Lenich Meyer, B. 8., 
Professor of the Natural Sciences. 

Rev. Benjamin F. Daugherty, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

M. Etta Wolfe, A. M., 
Professor oi the Modern Languages and English Litera- 
ture. 

Carrie E. Smith, I 
Professor of Instrumental Music and Theory. 

Ella Nora Black, B. S., 
Assistant in Instrument Music 

Mrs. H. U Roop, A. M., 
Professor of Vocal Cultuie and Art. 

WlLLOUGHBY S. WlLDE, L. L. C. M., 

Professor of Harmony and Vocal Music. 

Hattie S. Shellky, M. E., 
Teacher of Elocution and Physical Culture. 

Leah C. Hartz, 
Teacher of Stenography and Typewriting. 

Bishop E. B. Kephart, D.D., LL.D., 
Lecturer on International Law and Biblical Antiquities. 

Rev. C E. Hurlburt, 
Instructor on English Bible. 

J. P. Millek, 1) D., 
Lecturer on Social Ethics. 

O. P. DeWitt. A. M., 
History and English. 



Jay W. Yoe, President, Y M. C. A. 
S. F. Daugherty. Secretary. 
Leah C. Hartz, President Y. W. C. A. 
Anna Myers, Secretary. 

COLLEGE LIBRARIAN. 

Prof. J. T. Spangler. 



Fiction may be regarded as one 
the best forms of literature. Not fi c . 
tion written with a view of simply 
showing the author's ability to create 
plots and change and warp facts. But 
that fiction having in it the arrange, 
ment of facts and intricacies of plot 
which bring the mind into a state of 
impressibility, so that the moral— for 
all true fiction has a moral — may take 
the intended hold of the mind and 
leave a lasting impression of the truth 
thus taught. 

The facts and plots in fiction no 
more make it good literature than the 
coal in the blacksmith's forge n 
pig iron into horseshoes. The coal 
makes the iron only impressible for 
the hammer of the smith, but it is the 
hammer in the hands of the smith 
that shapes the horseshoe. So iu true 
fiction, facts heat the mind, truth makes 
the impression. 

C. E. S., 'oo. 

Multum in parvo — Fat woman in 
bathing suit. 

* * 
* 

"Just one kiss," he pleaded with 
outstretched arms. 

She burst into tears. "Oh, yo 
stingy thing," she wailed. — Ex. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

W. G. Clippingek, President. 
Susie Moyer, Secretary. 
H. E. Miller, Base Ball Manager. 
O. P. DeWitt. Foot Ball Manager. 

LECTURE COMMITTEE. 

Harry Imbodkn, President. 
Alle> Baer, Secretary. 



How strange it is that we should 
use blotting paper to keep from bio 1 ' 
ting paper. 



_ /'ft>r 

A NT ED— T K U ST WORTHY AND ACT 1 V B . ".. 
tit-men or ladies to tmvel tor reH' 011 ^ 
established house. Monthly 865..0 and ex l ,t ' ,1 \ es . lil) f 
lion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed ■J^ga 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. V., uu 



W 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



3i 



Mr. R. (when calling one Sat. eve). 
."Oh ! The oil is going out." 



Professor (dictating Greek prose 
composition) — Slave, where is thy 
horse ? 

Startled Senior — It's under my chair 
but I wasn't using it, sir. — Ex. 



* * 



A shrewd little fellow who had just 
begun to study Latin astonished his 
teacher by the following translations : 
Vir, a man ; gin, a trap — Virgin, a 
man-trap. — Ex. 



One day a tramp asked a lady for a 
piece of bread. 

As she hand it to him, she said, 
"This I give not for my sake, nor for 
your sake, but for Christ's sake." 

The tramp handed it back to her, 
and said, "Not for my sake, nor for 
your sake, but for God's sake put some 
butter on it." 



* 



Sat. 2.30 a. m.— "Get up, Sanders ! 
Ge t up ! Breakfast is ready." 

The voice was from one who seemed 
°n mischief bent. 

Sanders arose, dressed hurriedly and 
then looked at the time and found it 
vv 'as 6 hours yet till breakfast. 

With bitter feelings he again re- 
mand peacefully rested until 2.30 
P- m. 



new Commonwealth 



Sboe Store. 



753 Cumberland St., 

LEBANON, PA. " 

Makes it a special object to students in the 
way of a liberal "discount to buy their SHOES 
of them. 



an 



Who goes away should look as 
spruce as possible. Little things count 
—Neat Shirt, Collar, Cuffs, and a natty 
Tie, change a man wonderfully. You 
can get them all here. 

The latest ties in Puffs, Tecks, Four- 
in hands. Imperials at 50c ; Teck ; Bow 
and String Ties at 25c. 

E. P. Anthony, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



FACTS AND FICTION. 



A COMMENDABLE AND REMARKABLE OFFER. 



With the February number the subscription price of 
Facts and Fiction, that sprightly western monthly, will 
be raised to one dollar a year to give scope for extensive 
improvements. This publication is rapidly becoming 
recognized as the monthly of the west. The Chicago 
Daily News says of it : "Among the magazines that are 
full of value and interest is Facts and Fiction. Con- 
densed learning is easy to take when presented in such 
attractive guise." For the next thirty davs the pub- 
lisher offers to send this magazine one year for 50 cents, 
and as a premium, each subscriber will receive a copv of 
the meritorious book, The Home Instructor, by Thomas 
Hanford, D.D. This volume contains about 500 large 
pages, is bound in best cloth, beautifully stamped, printed 
on superior paper, profusely illustrated, and is made to 
sell for 32.75. This book and a vear's number of the 
magazine will cheer and delight, entertain and instruct 
old and young alike. This is regarded as the most liberal 
and remarkable premium offer ever made by a leading 
publication. Address the publisher, The Dominion 
Company, Chicago, 111. 



Rensselaer \ 
^Polytechnic^ 
c *4&^ Institute, * 



tr "alexiinim; 



Troy, N.Y. 

i provided for. Send for a Catalogue. 



WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GEN- 
tlemeii or ladies to travel for responsible, 
estublished house. Monthly 105.00 and expenses. Posi- 
tion sieady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
enve ope. The Dominion Compony, Dept. V., Chicago. 



TEACHERS 



Desiring positions in any State in the Union should write to us. We charge no com- 
mission or salary for our services. Life membership and duplicate registration for one 
1)11 can tin ~ " ' fee - Grac * ua te students in great demand. 100 good teachers wanted immediately, 

'Vesent.' 1 h?v', K , ( '' v' y vu»;a»iMes in IVim'a. «m short notiw. Address, h. H. HOPKINS & CO.. Hancock, Md. 
hui in v. w York, Chicago, ban Franciseo, Boston, Denver, New Orleans, Philadelphia and Atlanta. 2-5mo. 



32 



E, B, MARSHALL, M,D, 

No, 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

HARRY ZIMMERMAN, D,D,S„ 
DENTAL ROOMS, 

72 West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

J, R. McCAULEY, 



JACOB SARGENT, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

1 8 and 20 West flain St. , ANNVILLE. 



WILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, ANNVILLE, PA, 

F, W. FROST, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA, 

H. H. KREIDER. 
JNO. E. HERR. 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP 

Hard £. Soft Coal ; Grain, Seeds, Salt & Feed, 

Office: Railroad St., near Depot. a NNVTT TP PA 
Telephone Connection. /unin v m-c, r/v 

QNOWFLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 

A. C. M. HIESTER, Prop. 

FINE JOB PRINTING 

North White Oak Street, ANNVILLE, PA 



KREIDER & CO,, 



H, S, WOLF. 



DEALER IN 

Green Groceries and Confectioneries, 

RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
FURNITURE & UNDERTAKING, 

West Main St, ANNVILLE, PA. 

I860. 1885. 

J, HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT 

S. W, Corner 8th and Willow, LEBANON, 

«*=ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



DAILY MEAT MARKET, 

GOOD MEAT— LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, 

S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY^ 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS 

One door West Penn'a. House, Annville, 



M. H. SHAUD, 

—DEALER IN — 

Gold Watehes and Jeujelpy, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer m 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYSTKR 
A M> CKKAM. AfiriVILiLiE, 



Shenk & Kinports, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
Dealers in DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 
and Ladies' Dress Goods, 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home 
made. Ingrain, and Brussels Carpets. You 
buy cheaper from us than away from home, 
and have a large stock to select from. 

If you want to Buy a Hat Right, and a Fight 
or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

00 70 Erb & Craumer | 

Eighth and Cumb. Sts„ LEBANON, V 
DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING 

PHOTOENGRAVING. 

Penn'a, Engraving Co* 

114420 S, 7th St, PHILADELPHIA. 

COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Theo, Leonhardt & Sofli 

LITHOGRAPHERS. 

5th and Library Sts., PHILA 

Diplomas and Certificates of Membe fsblp ' 
Also Commercial Work our Specialty' 



THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS, 
R, A, MAULFAIR, Gen. Agt. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ALL THE LATEST AND BEST POLICIES ISSUED. 

TEACHERS. 

Union Teachers' Agencies of America. 

REV. L. D. BASS, D. D., MANAGER. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, 
La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C, 
San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, 111., St. 
L/Ouis, Mo., and Denver, Colo. 

There are thousands of positions to be filled. 
We had over 8,000 vacancies last season. Un 
surpassed facilities for placing teachers in any 
part of the U. S. or Canada. One fee registers 
iu nine offices. More vacancies than teachers. 
Address all Applications to Pittsburg, Pa. 



J. L. LEMBERGER. 



FRANK (il.KISJ. 

LEMBERGER & CO., 

DRUGGISTS and PHARMACISTS. 

9th and Cumberland Sts.. LEBANON, PA. 

Our claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of first importance — ACCURACY. 




TSiASJE MARKS* 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS &.c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, whether an invention Is 
probably patentable. Communications strictly 
conadential. Oldest »irenc>* Torwecuring patents 
in America. We hu re a Washington office. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice iu the 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
tta y scientific Journal, veekly, terms $3.00 a year : 
>i.oOsuc months. Specimen copies and HAND 
boos on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway, New York. 



I DOUBLE YOUR INCOME $ 

<R by representing us during- your leisure© 
<fe hours. X 

9 SALARY PAID WEEKLY $ 

to thosegiving entiretimetoourwork.^ 
2? Address, giving age, occupation i.nd w 
3? reference, i') 
£ DODD, MEAD & CO., New York.g 



I Translations 

LtiteFal Interlinear, 
67 Volumes. 

Dictionaries 

German, Fireneh, 
Italian, Spanish, 
Ltatin and Greek. 



I Arthur Hinds & Co., 

I 4 Cooper Institute, NEW YORK. 



iller Organ 



Is the Finest and Best 
Organ Made. 



Sold all over the world 
upon its merits alone. 



SPECIAL 

INDUCEMENTS 

To Churches, Sunday 
Schools and Ministers. 



Write to us and get our 
prices and terms. 
Catalogue, etc., free. 



MILLER ORGAN CO., 




& GATES, 





142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON. 

Special Inducements To Students. 



Superior Advantages. 



Most Reasonable Rates, 



WWW 

Ltebanon Valley College, 

I FOUNDED 1866. 

pot* iiadies and Gentlemen. 

1. Thirty-second Year Opened with Double the Attendance of 
last Year. 

Three Commodious Buildings j Full Classical, Scientific 
and Musical Courses. 

2. An able Faculty ; High Standard ; Progressive Methods ; and a 
Well-selected Library. 

3. Environments of the Most Helpful Character in Social, Moral 
and Religious Life. 

4. A Fine Campus of about Ten Acres for Athletic Sports, and a 
well-equipped Gymnasium. 

Winter Term begins January 3d } Spring Term, March 28, 1898. 

address, REY H y R00p ph q p resjdent> 

flnnville, Pa. 



Webster's 
International 



A.C. Zimmerman, 



Dictionary I yjf 



The One Great Standard Authority. 

So writes Hon. D. J. Brewer, 
Justice U. S. Supreme Court. 

Successor of the 
"Unabridged." 

The Standard 

of the U. S. Gov't Printing 
Office, the U. S. Supreme 
Court, all the State Supreme 
Courts, and of nearly all the 
Schoolbooks. 

Warmly 
Commended 

by College Presidents, State 
Superintendents of Schools, 
and other Educators almost 
without number. 

THE BEST FOR PRACTICAL USE. 
It is easy to find the word wanted. 
It is easy to ascertain the pronunciation. 
It is easy to trace the growth of a word. 
It is easy to learn what a word means. 

The Pennsylvania School Journal say a: 

—The International Webster is a treasure house 
of universal knowledge to which all the world, in 
all its ages, has made contribution, and any one 
of us may have it at his elbow. 

HP Specimen pages sent on application to 
G. & C. MURRTAM CO., Publishers, 
Springfield, Mass., U.S. A. 





758 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 



Stephen Hubertis, 
Blank Book Manufacturer 

AND JOB BOOK BINDER 



. . . RULING, 
NUMBERING, 



WIRE ..A 
STITCHIHfi 



1125 and 1127 North Third St, 
HARRISBURG, PA, 



THE 

College ® 



LEBANON VAMiEY COLLEGE, 

AHNVlItliE, PR. 

J0U "NAl PRINT, ANNVILLE. PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS BP STflTIOHEBY. 

22 East Main St, ANNVILLE, 



Out* Shelves a»e constantly filled tuith 
J1BW, SHCOND~HflND and SHEUp WORN 

SCHOOL aid COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, 

TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

STATIOflESY, 
Wall Papet^Windou* Shades. 



A Selected Stock of the LATEST STYLES OF WALL 
PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

We Buy, Sell, and^Exchange Old 
and New Text Books. 

Teachers* 
Co-operative Association 

ESTABLISHED IN 1884. 
POSITIONS FILLED, 4,ooo. 



101 The Auditorium Building, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Seek3 Teachers who are ambitious for advance- 
ment rather than those without positions. 



Vhe 7?ft 



an 



Who goes away should look as 
spruce as possible. Little things: count 
—Neat vShirt, Collar, Cuffs, and a natty 
Tie, change a man wonderfully. You 
can get them all here. 

The latest ties in Puffs, Tecks, Four- 
in hands. Imperials at 50c ; Teck, Bow 
and String Ties at 25c. 

E. P. Anthony, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIME TABLE— Dec. 1, 1897. 



Leave 


2 


4 


6 


8 


10 


102 




fA. M. 


fA. M. 


fA. il] 


fP. M. 


*P. M. 


IaTm: 






7 30 




2 30 








8 15 


11 35 


3 17 








6 45 


9 00 


12 20 


4 05 


10 15 


7 30 




7 07 


9 22 


12 42 


4 28 


10 37 


7 52 






8 30 


11 10 


3 30 






7 30 


9 45 


1 05 


5 00 


11 00 


8 16 




7 00 




12 15 


4 00 






7 50 


10 05 


1 24 


5 20 


11 20 


8 35 




8 07 


10 23 


1 41 


5 H8 


11 37 


8 54 




8 26 


10 45 


2 05 


6 02 


12 00 


9 17 


Mechanicsburg 


8 45 


11 06 


2 27 


6 25 


12 23 


9 40 








1 40 


6 10 






Ar. Harrisburg .... 


9 00 


li:25 


2 45 


6 4o 


12 45 


10 00 




P. M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P.M. 


Ar. Philadelphia.. 


11 48 


3 00 


6 47 


10 20 


4 30 


12 60 




2 13 


5 53 


8 23 


3 53 


7 33 


3 30 




12 40 


3 11 


6 00 


9 45 


6 20 


12 43 




P. M. 


P. St. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle for Harrisburg 
daily, except Sunday, at 5.50 a. m., 7.05 a. m., 12.20 p. m., 
3.45 p. m. and 9.10 p. m., and from Mechanicsburg at 6.14 
a. m., 7.29 a. m., 9.39 a. m., 12.45 p. m., 4.10 p. m., 5.35 p. 
m., and 9.35 p. m., stopping at 2d street, Harrisburg, to 
let off passengers. 

Train No. 10 runs daily between Harrisburg and Hag- 
erstown. 

I No. 102 Sunday only. 

* Daily. t Daily except Snnday. 



Leave 



Baltimore 

New York 

Philadelphia . 



Harrisburg 

Dillsburg* 

Mechanicsburg. . 

Carlisle 

Newville 

Shippensburg.... 

Waynesboro 

Chambersburg... 

Mercersburg 

Qreencastle 

Hagerstown 

Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester. . 



p. M. 
11 50 
i 40 
11 20 

tA. M. 

5 00 



5 19 

5 40 

6 04 
6 23 



6 43 
8 10 

7 10 

7 32 

8 24 

9 10 

A. M. 



A.[M. 
4 55 
12 05 
4 30 
tA. M. 
7 55 



8 12 
8 36 

8 59 

9 16 
10 37 

9 35 
10 30 
10 02 

10 25 

11 25 

12 35 
P. M. 



A. M. 
8 50 



8 30 
fA. M. 

11 45 

12 40 
12 05 
12 30 
12 52 

1 11 

2 10 
1 33 



2 00 
2 25 



A. M. 

12 00 
8 50 
12 25 
■fr. m. 

3 50 

4 33 
4 12 

4 35 

5 00 

5 18 

6 16 

5 40 

6 30 
6 01 

6 27 

7 10 
7 55 

P. M. 



9 103 



P. M. 
4 49 
1 50 

34 35 

*P. M, 

7 55 



8 14 

8 33 

8 52 

9 10 



9 28 



9 49 
10 10 



A. M. 

4 35 
12 05 

4 30 
lA.lt. 

8 00 



8 20 

8 13 

9 08 
9 27 



9 47 



10 11 

10 85 



A.M. 



Additional local trains will leave Harrisburg daily, ex- 
cept Sunday, for Carlisle and intermediate stations at 
9.35 a. m., 2.00 p. m., 5.25 p. m., 6.25 p. m. and 10.55 p. m., 
also for Mechanicsburg, Dillsburg and intermediate sta- 
tions at 8.22 a. m. All the above trains will stop at Sec- 
ond street, Harrisburg, to take on passengers. 

No. 9 runs dailv between Harrisburg and Hagerstown. 
g No. 103 Sunday onlv. * Daily. 

t Daily except Sunday. 

g On Sundays will leave Philadelphia at 4.30 p. m. 

Pullman parlor cars and through coaches betw een Hag- 
erstown and Philadelphia on trains 2 and 9 and through 
coaches between Winchester and Philadelphia on trains 
4 and 7. 

• II. A. Riddle, J. F. Boyd, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Supt. 



Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler. 

CLUB, COLLEGE & FRATERNITY 
EMBLEMS, WATCHES, D1AM> 
ONDS, JEWELRY, X X X A 



198 BROADWAY, NEW YOKK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates Furnished 



1 



The College Forum 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ITS STUDENTS AND FRIENDS. 



Voi . XI. No. 3. ANNVILLE, PA., MAKCH, 1898. Whole No. 109. 



THE SUNDAY NEWSPAPER- 



One of the most powerful tools in 
the hand of Satan is the Sunday news- 
paper. 

Numerous have been the protests 
by individuals against its circulation, 
nevertheless it continues to flourish. 
The American people as a body rather 
welcome its visits than otherwise. 
Some say it has come to stay, and per- 
haps it has. Some say it is a neces- 
sity, men in business need it, in order 
to be constantly informed of any 
change in the market price of com- 
modities, or fluctuation in home and 
foreign stocks. Such a plan is good 
enough for the greedy, grasping, ty- 
rannical millionaire ; but what devoted 
Christian man will listen to such a 
hollow, defenseless plea ? 

Others say it is a good thing to keep 
m en at home, out of the saloon. But 
who will deny that its faithful perusal 
fo * a length of time will lead men to 



very place from which they say it 



the 

keeps them ? Many other excuses all 
equally as flimsy have been made for 
1CS existence. The Sunday newspaper 
cannot be regarded by right-thinking 
peo Ple as anything but an evil. 

1 is an evil because it violates the 
. Ws of the land. Is not buying, sell- 
Si or vending of any kind, on the 



Sabbath, strictly forbidden ? Yet the 
vendor of the Sunday paper goes about 
every Sabbath morning calling out 
his wares with the same boldness as 
that of the huckster on a week-day. 
It is an evil because of its contents. 
All the famous blood-curdling events 
are depicted and illustrated in its col- 
umns with all the vividness possible 
to be put on paper. Domestic troubles 
such as divorce, alienation of affec- 
tions, real or supposed insults, scan- 
dals, elopements, and quarrels about 
mortgages or legacies, are all portray- 
ed in glaring colors. There are pic- 
tures bordering so closely upon the 
obscene that one almost needs a 
microscope to see where the proper 
ends and the improper begins. There 
are also columns of low debasing wit 
such as any lady or gentleman would 
shrink from using even in the society 
of a most intimate friend. 

But, says one, there are many good 
things in it after all, it is full of the 
best sayings of great men, and often 
contains sermons by leading divines 
of the land ; it is on that account that 
I buy it. * That appears to us very 
much like buying a load of street-re- 
fuse for the sake of the pins to be 
found therein. 

What father of a family who has 
any care for the future well-being of 



i 

m 



34 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 



his sons or daughters can allow their 
pure minds to become tainted with 
filth of the Sunday newspaper ? It is 
an evil because it detracts from the 
sanctity of the Sabbath day, and from 
God's house. What child of God's 
righteous indignation is not stirred to 
its very depths to hear every Sabbath 
morning the voice of the brazen-faced 
monger as he goes up and down the 
street calling out the name of some 
Sunday newspaper ; or worse still if, 
on the way to the house of God, he is 
met by this desecrator of the Sabbath 
who holds up a paper to him with the 
shameless request to buy ? The read- 
er of the paper has his attention drawn 
away from the sacredness of the Lord's 
day by the accounts of murders, elope- 
ments, etc., already referred to. And 
not only from the sacredness of the 
Sabbath is his attention drawn but 
from worship at church. How many 
readers of Sunday newspapers are ever 
found in the Sunday school, or church 
services? Their number is exceed.- 
ingly small. 

It is an evil, furthermore, because 
it very often keeps good, wholesome 
literature out of the home. How 
often we hear the remark by fathers 
of families that they cannot afford to 
subscribe for their church paper. At 
the same time they are spending five 
cents every Sunday for a Sunday pa- 
per. This amounts in a year to more 
than the price of the best church 
papers published. The fact is that 
they do not want anything better than 
the degrading, filthy Sunday paper. 
The church paper is too tame ; they 
want something lively, full of fun, 
interesting and exciting. Thus they 



are led away until their sensibility 
are dulled, and they find their mind's 
food in the vilest trash. 

But what of the children in hom 
where such literature takes the pl aCf 
of good literature? They will help 
by and by to recruit the ranks of the 
criminal classes, and after they have 
sunk to the lowest depths, their par- 
ents will begin to wonder why God 
should deal with them so harshly 
to allow their dear ones to disgrace 
themselves and their friends. 

In view of the things discussed, 
what should be the attitude of Chri 
tians toward the Sunday newspaper? 
Should they be passive and allow this 
young, but exceedingly active child of 
perdition to continue his destructive 
career unchecked? God forbid it! 
Could not, will not at least half or 
three-fourths of the twenty-five mil- 
lion followers of Christ arise with one 
accord and crush him out of existence? 
We must throttle him soon or he will 
throttle us. He is making more in 
fidels than any other single cause. 

Fellow students, let us do all in our 
power to create sentiment against tin 
wily curse so that people may not only 
shun it as they would a poisonoir 
serpent, but annihilate it. "Sanctif" 
yourselves, put away the unclean 
thing from among you that ye may 
a holy people unto me, saith the Lo 
God of Hosts." 

Edgar Sydney DoddS. 

THE SUPREMACY OF CONSCIENCE* 

I. W. HUNTZBKRGKR, '99' 
"Man is fearfully and wonder* 1 
made." Whether or not we f«H| 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



, C ept the sentiment of this terse ex- 
pression, we do know that he is a 
.strangely complex being. This most 
marvelous product of creation, man, 
in his dual nature, furnishes for us a 
field of study, the most fertile, the 
most interesting and the most instruc- 
tive within the limits of human con- 
ception. 

While both phases of man's nature 
are interesting for study, it is in the 
conception of man's rational or spirit- 
ual being that we comprehend the 
highest sphere of creation. This ra- 
tional being possesses the faculties of 
intelligence, of sensibility and of 
choice, each working in its own sphere, 
yet inter-dependent and necessary to a 
complete rational being. 

In contemplating any subject, we 
recognize in it an inherent, controlling 
force, guiding and directing it. The 
nature of this guiding force varies as 
the character of the subject itself 
vanes, but it is always present. In 
our contemplation of the rational man 
we seek for this guiding force, and we 
fi nd it in the conscience. 
The very existence of this faculty 
conditioned in the existence of the 
Acuities of intelligence, of sensibility 
and of choice, by virtue of which man 
^conies a moral agent. At the very 
Jase of its action are perception and 
""ousness. Upon these funda- 
ne ntal powers depend the representa- 
. Ve Powers of memory and imagina- 
]lese > m turn, are necessary to 
action of the higher powers. 
lthout al l these, the logical power, 
prison, judgment and conclusion 
^ be impossible, as having no 
,s upon which to work. Reason 



35 

needs this knowledge in order to per- 
form its office. 

Thus the various faculties of know- 
ing are arranged in an ascending order, 
crowned by Reason. But none of 
these can take the place of conscience. 
They tell us what />, or has been. 
They tell us what is logically right. 
But the conscience involves the idea 
of ought. It tells us what is ethically 
or morally right, and which man is 
under obligation to do. 

Man as a moral agent, is bound by 
Moral Law. This is the law of right 
and duty. It is by virtue of the dis- 
cernment of what this law is, and de- 
mand for obedience to the law, that 
conscience comes into its place of 
supremacy. Each of the faculties is 
authoritative in its individual sphere, 
but the conscience transcends all these, 
and directs us in the realm in which 
human life attains its supreme pur- 
pose and worth. Moral goodness and 
personal worthiness constitute this 
realm. In its demand for obedience, 
it does not originate the obligation 
which it places upon us, but as the 
interpreter of the Law of Right, im- 
poses upon us duty, irrespective of our 
will, and demands homage from the 
will. It brings us into the presence 
of One who rules over all, and who, 
through the conscience, makes known 
to us the supreme Law of Right which 
He has established for the moral guid- 
ance of man. 

This guiding force is necessary, for 
it is unreasonable to suppose that the 
Omniscient should have created man, 
as a rational being, capable of moral 
character, without endowing him with 
some faculty which should be a guide 



36 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



in meeting the varied responsibilities 
and duties of life. An absence of such 
a guiding force wonld mean that there 
is no responsibility, a conclusion con- 
tradicted by man's very rationality, as 
distinguishing him from other crea- 
tures ; or, that human nature is con- 
structed in a falsehood, being bound 
by Moral Law, with no capacity for 
determining proper obedience. 

But the question arises, Is not the 
conscience fallible ? We acknowledge 
its fallibility. This may, at first 
thought, seem inconsistent with such 
authority as we have attributed to it. 
But to say that the conscience is in- 
fallible, is to say that man, in so far, 
is placed on an equality with the Crea- 
tor, who is recognized as the only be- 
ing that is perfect, and consequently 
infallible. It would be a direct con- 
tradiction of the teachings of Holy 
Writ. It would be a denial of the en- 
tire system of religion. 

If, then, it is possible for the con- 
science to err, can we safely follow its 
dictates? In its judgments for apply- 
ing the Moral Law to the varied condi- 
tions and relations of human life, it 
depends upon the other faculties for 
sufficient evidence upon which to base 
its decisions. Its fallibility is only 
co-extensive with the fallibility of 
these faculties. The decision of the 
conscience, when correctly and fully 
reached, is the soul's conviction of 
what is right and duty. For the will 
to act contrary to what the conscience 
dictates as right, is essentially wrong. 

A deplorable fact, arresting our at- 
tention here, is the frequent recurrence 
of wrongs committed and excused on 
the plea that they are done in obedi- 



ence to conscience. But these are 
done, not in accordance with the dic- 
tates of conscience, but because its die- 
tates are not heeded. There are many 
strong but evil motives in human 
nature. The appetites, ambition, fame 
wealth, power, prejudice — all fill the 
soul with impure motives, and crowd 
out or suppress the requests of con- 
science. It is from these that come 
crimes and wrongs credited to zeal in- 
spired by conscience. 

Conscience may be represented as 
one who presides over a tribunal of 
justice. The individual man is the 
organic unity of mankind — the state. 
The Law of Right is the supreme law 
governing the state. The mind is the 
tribunal of justice. Its subordinate 
faculties are the witnesses by who' 
testimony the conscience — the judge, 
is enabled to decide whether a deed 
be, or be not, in accordance with the 
Law of Right. If these subordinate 
faculties are not entirely reliable, the 
conscience may be in error as to the 
particular case under consideration, 
but cannot be in principle, since its 
decision is in accordance with the facts 
presented, and in harmony with the 
Law of Right. Though we may 
that case do what would be regarded 
by others as wrong, we have main- 
tained our own moral integrity, he 
cause we have maintained the funda- 
mental and essential elements of al 
morality — true motive and honest ejj 
These are the grandest and greatest 
elements of moral character and p er ' 
sonal worthiness. 



Wherever you find envy, there you 
rjorance. 



6nd If 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



37 



CLOISTER, 



H. L. ElCHINGKR. 

[Note : — Cloister is a historical 
relic located near Ephrata, Lancaster 
County.] 

Finding myself detained at Ephrata 
over Sunday, I began to look about 
for points of interest, and through the 
indness of Oscar Von Neida I was 
ken to Cloister. Cloister is a settle- 
ent of Seventh Day Baptists, located 
'mmediately outside the borough 
imits of Ephrata. They are a separate 
and peculiar people in the community, 
and the chief point of peculiarity 
bout them is the keeping of Saturday 
Sunday. While visiting there on 
Sunday afternoon, I saw them cutting 
wood, cleaning stables, etc. 

In the summer they will work for 
the neighbors any day except Saturday, 
and as no person will employ them on 
'unday, they find employment on 
unday in tending their gardens, 
cutting wood, and the like. 

The property, which is owned by 
he society as a whole, consists of one 
undred an 1 ten acres, divided into 
o farms with two sets of farm 
Uildings. Also a chapel, a "sister- 
house," a "brother-house," and a 
umber of small houses erected for 
e families of the society. 
The land, which was a much larger 
act m the beginning, was donated to 
*e society by Wm. Penn. 
The society was founded by Conrad 
eissel, a German, in the year 1730, 
ad a number of the buildings which 
e still standing were erected in 1737, 
, Uc h makes them one hundred and 
% years old. When Washington 
at Brandywine, and after that 



battle, these buildings were used as a 
hospital for his troops, and Washing- 
ton himself visited the place a number 
of times. Once afterwards, when the 
yellow fever broke out in Washington's 
army, this place was opened as a 
hospital and the "sisters" of the'societv 
acted as nurses. At this time about 
one hundred and fifty of his soldiers 
died here and were buried on the 
premises. A monument was com- 
menced in their honor a few years ago, 
but has never been completed. As a 
society, they had their own mill, saw- 
mill, paper-mill, crockery, blacksmith- 
shop, printing office, school, and many 
other industries. The second printing 
press in the U. S. was in their office 
and the first German Bible printed in 
America was printed here. (The press 
is now on exhibition in Philadelphia. ) 

The buildings are old-fashioned, 
and some of the original furniture is 
still in them ; such as tables, chairs, 
benches, and cup-boards. All the 
original hinges and latches are wooden. 
The hinges are- mortised into the door 
and fastened to the frame with wooden 
pins. An old eight-day clock which 
was put into one of the rooms soon 
after the buildings were erected, may 
still be seen standing there. It is 
now fastened to the wall so that it 
cannot be removed. No ceilings, not 
even in the chapel, are over seven feet 
high. Doors are not over from four 
to six feet high, and any ordinary 
sized man would touch on both sides 
in passing through doors or halls. 

The chapel is a square four-story 
building, with the roof coming down 
on each side to the second story. 
There are no dormer windows in the 



38 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



roof and the only light the third and 
fourth stories receive, comes from 
small windows in the ends of the 
building. Inside it is finished in 
wood and outside it is plastered with 
mud mixed with gravel. The lower 
room is used as a meeting place and 
the rooms above it are used for 
dwelling purposes. 

The ''brother" and "sister" houses 
are very much alike, except that the 
"brother-house" is three story while 
the other is only two story. The 
members of each floor lived separately 
from the members of the other floors 
or flats. The "brother-house" was for 
the accommodation of the single men, 
and the "sister-house" for the single 
women, hence the name brother-house 
and sister-house. Each floor had its 
kitchen, dining-room, sitting-room and 
six sleeping rooms on one side of the 
narrow hall, and ten sleeping rooms 
six feet by twelve, with one window 
about two feet square to each room, 
on the other side. 

These rooms were plastered with 
mud, mixed with meadow-grass, and 
the bed-rooms were not heated. 
The beds were merely bunks and 
many of them consisted of two wooden 
pins in the partition with a board 
laid across them. 

Outside these buildings are plastered 
like the chapel. There are also six or 
seven small dwelling houses still 
standing. 

The last place we were taken to, in 
fact the last place we all will be taken 
to in this world, was the graveyard. 

Here the guide pointed out the 
grave of Conrad Beissel, the founder 
of the society, who came to this 



country from Germany, in 1700. Also 
the grave of Peter Miller, the successor 
to Beissel, who it is claimed translated 
the Declaration of Independence into 
seven languages, which were sent to 
the different countries of Europe 
where they are now kept as relics 

The remains of Ludwig Hacker also 
rest in this old graveyard. They claim 
for him the honor of having been the 
first public school teacher. The first 
graves were made here in 1730. 

At its best the society numbered 
about three hundred members, while 
at present it does not number over 
fifteen. Any person will be well 
repaid for the trouble and time spent 
in paying a visit to Cloister. Ephrata 
is an enterprising town of about three 
thousand population, in the eastern 
part of Lancaster county, and is well 
worth a visit. 

a; 

PHILOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY, 

"Esse Qiiam Videri." 

Ralph D. Reider, '00, Editor. 
We do not mean to criticise any of 
our Philo speakers but merely to offer 
a few suggestions. In speaking before 
an audience of any kind, we should 
endeavor to be natural. Naturalness 
is only another word for propriety. 
Matter that has no bearing on the sub- 
ject under discussion should be strict}) 
avoided. Distinctiveness is also very 
desirable. Speakers should cultivate 
the power of discrimination. ^° 
make proper contrasts is also a d eSir ' 
able trait of an orator. Consistency 
commands respect and is a strong ^ aC ' 
tor in debate. Gesture and voice are 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



39 



prime importance and should re- 
ive close attention. It is perhaps 
fficult to comply with all of these 
ggestions but it appears to us as be- 
g worthy of earnest thought. 

It received a pleasant visit from 
e Clios during the month which was 
areatly appreciated by our boys. 

Owing to the entertainment given 
y the Ransom Entertainers on Feb. 
18, the program was dispensed with. 
However, every one seemed greatly de- 
lighted with the entertainment fur- 
nished. 

The reading room has been greatly 
improved during the month by the 
addition of several newspapers and 
exchanges. 



X 

EXCHANGES, 



Owing to the fact that the Forum 
is published at the beginning of the 
month we may not be able to com- 
ment on the February number of some 
of our exchanges. This will account 
for the fact that we will sometimes be 
a month behind in our comments and 
criticisms. 

"The College Student" for Febru- 
ar )' is very spicy and versatile. While 
| l contains much solid reading matter, 
11 also has the happy virtue of con- 
fining much true, crisp college humor. 
Among the articles notable for the 
latter are : "The Spirit of '98," and 
f Ile OP Man's Opinyuns." On the 
^j ol e, it is an up-to-date college jour- 



tion 



in e Hrskinian" is, in our estima- 



' °«e of the Forum's finest ex- 



changes both as to its appearance and 
its literary merits. It lacks that 
spirit of provincial narrowness which 
is a bane of so many of the college 
journals to-day. An especially good 
feature about it is that it gives careful 
attention to its exchange department, 
thus showing its appreciation of its 
exchanges. 

For Men Only, 

' x a— 'puaxi Jaq uo puB;s o; psq aqs ji 
'Moqamos ;i ye }aS p.atjs avou^ 

^pB3J[B S ( 3I{S IU30(I STTJX 

•Avoqs b jo puin ;sb3i aq; s^S aqs ji 
'a\oha*iib ;no }i puij n.aqs ';aq noA 

'uBiuoAv b S3UJOAY SuhuXub s.ajaqi 

"The Irving Sketch Book" for 
February contains a timely article on 
"What a College Education Should 
Mean For a Girl," from which we clip 
the following : 

"A college education should mean 
discipline and discipline gives method. 
Perhaps the most important discipline 
is of the mind. Great as is the influ- 
ence of the college, it cannot do every- 
thing ; it cannot add to the brain, but 
by careful training and method it can 
teach how the brain is to be strength- 
ened and used to the best advantage. 

"Woman at her graduation, mingles 
with the world, prepared by college 
life to fight her battles. By destroy- 
ing her prejudices her character has 
been broadened and she has learned to 
tolerate many things that she would 
never have been able to bear." 

a; 

Miss S. has kindly offered to mend 
the boys' coats. Mr. S. can testify to 
this. 



4o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The College Forum, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly 
throughout the college year by the Philokosmian 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

O. P. DeWitt, U\ Editor-in-Chief. 
Jay W. Yoe, '98. C. E. Snoke, '00. 

C. V. Clippinger, '99. R. R. Butterwick, '01. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, Business Manager. 

S. F. Daugherty, '00, Assistant Business Manager. 

Terms s Twentyfive cents a year, five cents a copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to 
all subscribers until an order is received for its dis' 
continuance, and until all arrearages have been paid. 



Address all communications, articles for publication, 
exchanges, etc., to W. G. Clippinger, Box 86, Ann- 
ville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second- 
class mail matter. 



EDITORIALS, 



Russia is destined to become one of 
the strongest and most formidable na- 
tions on the earth. They are break- 
ing awa) from old environments and 
taking to new and western methods. 
The Japan-Chinese War was an eye- 
opener to Russia Her people are 
naturally shrewd. Her statesmanship 
exhibits a far-seeing sagacity. With 
prodigious energy does she project her 
enterprises upon colossal scales. Her 
population, since 1890, has increased 
seven millions. 

The Trans-Siberian Railway is fast 
nearing completion. It is the great- 
est railroad in the world and the only 
one having an emperor for a president. 
It will be in running order in less 
than three years. It is estimated that 
then we shall be able to make a trip 



around the world in from 30 to 
days. As it nears the Pacific th" 
road separates into two divisions, c 
goes straight to the Russian p or t 
Vladivostok. This is nearing compl e 
tion at the present time. Trains are 
now able to run as far as the Aino 
thence by swift vessels down the riv 
and across the Ussuri section to Via 
ivostok, making the distance fro 
London, with passengers, mail, etc., to 
the most important ports on the Jap 
Sea in seventeen days. The other 
vision strikes down through Chine 
Manchuria in a southeasterly directio 
to Peking, a shorter route to the se 
by over 300 miles. It terminates in 
port which is open all the year round 
The northern part is tightly covere 
with ice during the winter. It is 
timated that when the road is co 
pleted a train will be able to g 
from St. Petersburg to Peking in fiv 
days. This road will carry to easte 
Asia most of the passengers and muc 
of the freight that now is transport 
by sea. The completion and poss 
sion of this railroad is the one grea 
reason for Russia being so anxious t 
aid China in a financial way. It woul 
give her control of the very heart 
China, through which she desires 
construct her railway and be in co 
stant touch with an open Pacific po 

* * 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TEACH 

What does the teacher do for t] 
school? What does he do for ll 
community in which the institution 
located ? It may be thought that 1 
is hired only to teach the school at 
and so the community tan have 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 



4i 



claim on him ; but thisposition cannot 
be allowed. In some way the school 
a nd the teacher must be a positive 
force in the community. The true 
teacher possesses that spirit which 
eeks not alone the pecuniary emolu- 
ments, but desires to be in the highest 
degree useful to those who sit at his 
feet of instruction. He possesses a 
spirit that elevates above every thing 
else the nature and capabilities of the 
human soul, one that trembles under 
the responsibility of attempting to be 
its educator. 

There are too many who leave the 
community just where they found it. 
They do not possess that spirit which 
looks upon gold as the contemptible 
dross of the earth, when compared 
with that imperishable gem which is 
be polished and brought out into 
eaven's light to shine forever. Too 
many enter the profession as a second- 
ly object. The wish to teach a few 
ears to be more thoroughly prepared 
or another calling — one that is near 
and dear to their heart. Such teachers 
cannot possibly have the proper spirit 
f the work. They certainly do not 
dvance the community in which 
hey labor so much as if their heart 
and soul were in their work. They 
do not go to their duty full of the 
proper work. They are not impressed 
with the overwhelming importance of 
many human souls placed in their 
charge for culture. They should be 
thoroughly prepared to feed and 
°urish those intellects with intellect- 
Ual food. They should feel that their 

istakes in this calling ruin both the 
e acher and the student. The student 

ls ills to which the teacher as 



physician must prescribe. He stands 
in a place where ignorance is no 
excuse; it is a sin. He must prescribe 
the proper cure for the right disease. 
There are puny and even diseased 
intellects, and the teacher who cannot 
or does not perceive these imperfections 
and administer the proper remedy, is 
he who has no calling to enter the 
highest of professions. His unskillful 
hands are not the proper ones to play 
the harp, whose tones, whose living 
tones, are left forever in the strings. 

Then, again, the work done for the 
community powerfully reacts on the 
student body of the school. The 
students feel that the teacher is there 
for their good, not simply to pound 
the sciences and languages into them. 
They gain a respect for him and his 
work, when they see him engaged in 
elevating the moral sentiment of the 
community. 

PERSONALS. 

H. J. Roop, of Highspire, was visit- 
ing his son, Pres. Roop, on Feb. 12th. 

Miss Edith Grabill spent Saturday, 
February 13th, with Miss Susie Moyer, 
at Derry. 

A. U. Baer '98, was visiting his 
parents in Bridgeport for a few days, 
during the past month. 

Mr. R. R. Butterwick 01, was 
visiting friends in Jonestown over 
Sunday, February 20th. 

Mr. Geo. Mowers, once a student of 
L. V. C, and now living in Chambers- 
burg, gave the College a pleasant call 
on the 6th, and remained a few days. 



42 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 



J. D. S tell man '99, was home to 
visit his parents at Mountville, 011 
Sunday, February 20th. 

Miss Snyder was home for a few 
days the first week of February, at- 
tending the marriage of her brother. 

Mr. I. W. Huntzberger '99, was 
visiting his parents at Klizabethtown 
over Saturday and Sunday, February 
13th and 14th. 

Rev. H. L. Eichinger has filled the 
pulpit of the U. B. Church at Ephrata, 
Pa., on two different occasions during 
the past month, and also filled a 
number on their lecture course. 

The following members of the Y. 
M. C. A. were in attendance at the 
State Convention which convened at 
York, on February 17th to 20th: J. 
W. Yoe, J. D. Stehman and Adam 
Weir. 

X 

BUSINESS ! BUSINESS! 

The business manager desires to call 
the attention of the readers to the 
premium offer of a fountain pen for 
twelve new subscribers. This pen is 
made by the Diamond Point Pen Co., 
New York, and is guaranteed in every 
respect. Already several of the stu- 
dents have earned a pen by this easy 
method and some have almost com- 
pleted the second club. The names 
need not all be handed in at the same 
time, but should be forwarded as soon 
as received. Credit will be given for 
the amount. Fellow students and 
readers, get up a club. 

We wish also to call the attention 
of the readers to the advertisement of 



the McFadden Exerciser, which a p. 
pears for the first time in this issue. 
One of the exercisers is on exhibition 
in room No. 13, where persons desir- 
ing to purchase may examine it. Sev- 
eral have already been sold. 

And now another word to delin- 
quents. We have never been so grat- 
ified with the promptness with which 
our subscribers have paid up their 
subscription, but a few yet remain 
who have neglected this matter. If 
you belong to this number, let us hear 
from you. 

CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY, 

Virtute et Fide. 

LEAH C. Hartz, '99, Editor. 
If there is one thing in society work 
that needs emphasis it is enthusiasm. 
"Nothing great was ever achieved 
without enthusiasm." Surely no one 
need be afraid of being too enthusias- 
tic in society work. The noblest and 
most profitable way for the individual 
member to manifest her enthusiasm, 
is to take an active part in all the de- 
partments of work, endeavoring not to 
shirk as much as possible in the per- 
formance of a duty or self-imposed 
task, but to use the capabilities to the 
utmost. To procure a substitute 
means a loss in the literary training 10 
the one who shirks, a gain to the one 
who takes her place. Experience 
alone is worth more than book know- 
ledge alone ; the union of the two is a 
power of much magnitude. It isonh 
a possible power, to have stored the 
mind with certain facts from certain 
books in the College curriculum, bllt 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



43 



t j s a privilege that should be highly 
rized and meekly received with grat- 
itude, while keeping in mind that the 
paly real value of facts is that their 
use may develop ideas. 

One of the leading events of the 
society this month was the joint ses- 
sion with our brother Kalos. Another 
interesting feature was the impromptu 
programme rendered by the ladies. 

Arrangements are being made for a 
joint session with the Philos in the 
near future. These joint sessions are 
always a source of great pleasure and 
profit to all. 

a; 

OUR ALUMNI. 

The Alumni editor would be pleased 
to hear from each alumnus. 

Reno S. Harp '89, a prominent 
attorney from Frederick City, Md., 
spent some time in town, visiting 
friends. 

Rev. S. C. Enck '91, is pursuing 
postgraduate studies, and was here 
lately taking examination. We are 
always pleased to see you Schuyler. 
Come again. 

Prof. S. O. Goho '80, formerly city 
superintendent of schools, Milton, 
Pa -, but now agent for the American 
B °ok Company, visited the home of 
hi s Alma Mater. 

Gorman C. Schlichter '97, Y. M. C. 
^ Secretary in the city of Philadelphia, 
P ai d us a brief visit while on his way 
to Steelton, where he attended a 
Mention of Y. M. C. A. Secretaries. 

^. H. H. Roop '92, a graduate in 
Richie of the University of Penn- 



sylvania, has located at Columbia. 
Dr. Roop is well-fitted for his profes- 
sion, and we predict for him a pros- 
perous future. 

a; 

NEWSY NOTES, 

Rev. Dohner, our field agent, was 
present and conducted Chapel exer- 
cises on Feb. 1st. 

Rev. Dr. Miller was with us twice 
during the past month on his favorite 
theme Social Science. On the last of 
these occasions he gave us an inspir- 
ing talk on Friendship. 

Bishop Kephart gave another of 
those characteristic speeches of his 
during the month. The good Bishop 
always has something good for us 
each time he makes his appearance. 
On this occasion he gave a very in- 
teresting and instructive lecture on 
the Jew. 

The Ransom Entertainers gave un- 
bounded delight to the immense au- 
dience gathered in the Chapel, on 
Friday evening. Mr. Ransom is an 
expert magician, even rivalling Keller 
in many of his mvsterious tricks. 
This was perhaps the largest audience 
that has patronized the lecture course 
for years. 

President Roop is certainly a very- 
busy man. He is constantly on the 
go. During the past month he has 
delivered several speeches in addition 
to his regular work at the college. 
Among the principal places at which 
he has addressed, S. S. conventions, 
teachers' institutes and preached many- 
sermons, are Myerstown, Lebanon, 



44 



THB COLLEGE FORUM. 



Campbell town. He is now at con- 
ference looking after the various inter- 
ests of the institution of which he is 
president. 

A public meeting of the Y. M. C. 
A. was held in the College Chapel on 
Sunday afternoon, Feb. 13th, and was 
well attended by the people of town. 
The exercises were conducted by W. 
G. Clippinger. Able addresses were 
delivered by Messrs. C. K. Snoke, J. 
W. Yoe, Adam Weir and others. The 
addresses touched on the different 
phases of Y. M. C. A. work, all urging 
a closer consecration and earnest effort 
for the salvation of yonng men. The 
college quartette rendered some very 
pleasing aud choice selections. 

On Thursday evening, Feb. 10th, 
about 5.30 o'clock, nearly all the male 
students of the college indulged in a 
street parade in commemoration of the 
resignation of Senor Deputy Ue Lome, 
the Spanish minister, who wrote such 
an insulting letter concerning the 
president of the United States. Many 
of the students carried brooms across 
their shoulders. Others had horns, 
tin buckets, and all kinds of devices 
for making a noise. The procession 
marched through the principal streets 
of the town carrying in front a banner 
with the inscription, "Cuba and Lib- 
erty. De Lome Must Go." 

In front of the ladies' building the 
procession halted, where patriotic 
speeches were made by several of the 
boys. A fine pyrotechnic isplay add- 
ed to the interest and enthusiasm of 
the occasion. The demonstration 
wound up with singing "We'll Hang 
De Lome on a Sour Apple Tree," after 



which the students went to their 
rooms and the town again assumed its 
usual quietness. 

An event of unusual interest oc 
enrred in Chapel Hall on the afternoon 
of the twenty-second. The students 
had purchased a very nice 8x15^ 
silk bunting flag for the trustees of the 
college and on the afternoon of Wash- 
ington's Birthday it was formally pre- 
sented and accepted. Mr. W. G. Clip- 
pinger, representing the students of 
the college, made a good speech for 
the occasion and presented the flag 
Dr. Roop, on behalf of the trustees o 
the school, made the speech of accept- 
ance. He then delved into the sub- 
ject of patriotism and gave us a splen 
did address. The various orders 
the city were represented and good 
patriotic speeches were made by all. 
Morris A. Meyer spoke in behalf of 
the P. O. S. of A. S. W. Boltz ad- 
dressed us in the interest of the G. A. 
R. Mr. George Ulrich also gave a 
spirited talk. The occasion was mad 
lively and more interesting by recita- 
tions furnished by Miss Shelley and 
Mr. John Ulrich. The college or- 
chestra dispensed some very appro- 
priate music throughout the program. 
The occasion was one long to be re- 
membered in and about the college. 

The first section of the Junior Class 
made their first appearance in pubh c 
on Saturday evening, Feb. 19th. The 
occasion was public and at half p^ 1 
seven the hall was well filled ready r" 
hear the orations that were in st0 ] 
for us. They were somewhat late ! 
arriving upon the stage. When tW 
did come they came steadily marchm 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



45 



o the sweet strains of music from that 
e w piano and the music was executed 
well that even the preps in the 
gallery were anxious to get into the 
march. There were twelve members 
in this section and each one gave us a 
good production. The second section 
me on the program Feb. 26 and they 
as well as the first section gave us a 
good entertainment. The general 
criticism that we have to offer is lack 
of preparation and practice in the de- 
livery. This is applicable to all 
classes. We are apt to slight our 
hetorical work. The sections of all 
dasses might be somewhat more 
prompt in arriving upon the stage, 
he Junior class contains some of the 
est material in school and therefore a 
good program is expected when they 
come upon the stage. 

x 

ITEMS OF INTEREST. 

Matches are to be made from paper. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad is 9,024 
iles long. 

The public debt of the United States 
ow is $1,232,537,125. 

Railroad rails are being made in 
teelton, Pa., for a railroad in Paris. 

Inventor Elisha Gray, of telephone 
am e, is living a life of poverty in 
HKnois. 

fibrous preparation of steel is now 
oming into general use, instead of 
n d paper. 

Germany is a great ship building 
ountry of late. She now is engaged 
"wilding 275 ships. .Most of these 
for foreign countries. 



Vacant property, on Fifth Avenue, 
New York, is sold at from $4,000 to 
$5,000 a front foot. 

Single rail electric trolley cars sixty 
feet long are now being succeesfully 
tried in Europe. 

A bill has been introduced into 
Congress to change Inauguration Day 
from March 4th to April 30. 

Darmouth College issued the first 
college paper in the United States, 
and Daniel Webster was its editor. 

Missouri has the greatest deposit of 
lead ore in the world. It also has a 
supply of granite said to be without 
limit. 

Greater New York consists of forty- 
five islands. Just as many as there 
are stars in the new flag floating over 
the college building. 

An incandescent electric light for 
life buoys has been invented. When 
the buoy touches the water an india 
rubber bladder moves a lever which 
establishes a circuit and lights the 
lamps automatically. The power is 
furnished by an accumulator, which 
acts for eight hours. 

X-rays are now used to show the 
strength of the heart's action. They 
have shown that the work done by a 
sound heart has been greatly over- 
estimated, and have thus made easier 
to understand the vibrations of a 
diseased heart. It is now possible to 
detect disease of the valves much 
earlier than before ; also to find the 
relations of the heart and diaphragm. 
The rays are also used for early 
diagonisis of diseases of the lungs, 
stomach, and kidneys. 



4 6 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



A boat with steel fins has been 
invented by an Italian. It is propelled 
entirely by the motions of the sea 
water. Naturally, it goes best in 
rough weather. 

Pittsburg Locomotive Car Works 
are now at work upon another large 
order from the government of Japan 
in building four six-wheel Mogul 
locomotives. 

Damascus, and not Rome, should 
be called "The Eternal City." It is 
the oldest city in the world, and as 
long as man has written records the 
city of Damascus has been known. 

Australia is called the "Land of 
Inverted Orders." While we were 
enjoying our late zero weather, the 
Australians were seeking the shade 
and being prostrated by the excessive 
temperature of 150 Fahr. That 
country is equal in area to the United 
States, 15 times as large as France, 
and 26 times as large as the United 
Kingdom. 

The statistics of the principal ex- 
ports from the United States for the 
calendar year make a showing unpre- 
cedented in our history, as follows : 
Breadstuffs, 1897, $243,121,108; 1896, 
$176,278,478. Cotton, 1897, $212,- 
524,620; 1896, $233,387,419. Oil, 
1897, $59>°57>547 5 1896, $62,764,278. 
Provisions, 1897, $135,064,328 ; 1896, 
$127,928,472. Cattle and hogs, 1897, 
$36,460,438 ; 1896, $34,388,603. Total, 
1897, $686,228,041 ; 1896, $634,- 
637,250. 



The German authorities have 
cided to allow women to attend the 
University lectures, as guests. T] le 
government has instructed Prince 
Hohenlohe to arrange for the diplomas 
to be given such attendants. 

The requirements of a knowledge of 
international law by naval officers as 
a condition for promotion is a step in 
the right direction. The constant 
increase and importance of our foreign 
relations and the delicate questions 
which a naval commander is often 
called upon to decide without consul- 
tation with distant superiors, make it 
necessary for him to be well versed in 
the laws of nations. A constant study 
of this all important subject is required 
throughout the higher grades of a 
seaman's career. 



WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GE.V 
tlemen or ladies to travel for responsible, 
established house. Monthly 865. 00 and expenses. Posi- 
tion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope." The Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago. 



Hew Commonwealth 



Shoe Store. 



753 Cumberland St,, 

LEBANON, PA, 4 

Makes it a special object to students in the 
way of a liberal discount to buy their SHO 
of them. 



Rensselaer 



^Polytechnic^ 



Institute, 



Troy, N.Y. 

LrcalemmiiiMi urns urovided for. Send for a Catalogua 



WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE Gjg 
tlemen or ladies to travel for respou-^ 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses, 
tion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed ffiZfo 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. v 



'I'll A iOTJU l)0 Desiring positions in any State in the Union should write to us. We charge "9 „ 
I nAvjlinKu mission or salary for our services. Life membership and duplicate registration i", 
fee. Graduate students in great demand. 100 good teachers wanted iiBBiea' ^ 
who can till emergency vacancies in Penn'a. on short notice. Address, h H HOPKINS &. CO., HanCocH.^,,,, 
Represented in New York, Chicago, San Franeiseo, Boston, Denver, New Orleans, Philadelphia and Atlanta. - 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



47 



B, MARSHALL, M,D. 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

J-JARRY ZIMMERMAN, D.D.S,, 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

72 West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 West /lain St., ANNVILLE. 

WILLIAM KIEBLER, 

SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop. ANNVILLE, PA. 



F, W. FROST, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



pEIDER & CO., 



H. H. KREIDER. 
JNO. E. HERR. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 



Hard £ Soft Coal; Grain, Seeds, Salt L Feed, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Office: Railroad St., near Depot. 
Telephone Connection. 



Snowflake printing house, 

A. C. M. HIESTER, Prop. 

FINE JOB PRINTING 

North White Oak Street, ANNVILLE, PA 

H, S, WOLF. 

DEALER IX 

Green Groceries and Confectioneries. 

"RSTAURANT IN CONNECTION. 



Joseph miller, 

furniture & undertaking, 

_ West Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

860. ~ ' 

1885. 

J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT 

S ' W. Corner 8th and Willow, LEBANON. 
♦♦-ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



J, R. McCAULEY. 

DAILY MEAT MARKET, 

GOOD MEAT-LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, PA- 

s. 



M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HANI) 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One door West Penn'a. House, . Innville. 



M. H. SHAUD, 

—DEALER IN— 

Gold Watehes and Jerjuelpy, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYSTKKS 
AND CREAM. fl^NVILiUE, PA. 



Shenk & Kinports, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
Dealers in DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 
and Ladies' Dress Goods, 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home 
made. Ingrain, and Brussels Carpets. You 
buy cheaper from us than away from home, 
and have a large stock to select from. 



If you want to Buy a Hat Right, and a Right Hat, 
or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

G0 T0 Erb & Craumer, 

Eighth and Cumb. Sts„ LEBANON, PA. 
DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING. 

PHOTOENGRAVING, 

Penn'a, Engraving Co,, 

114420 S. 7th St., PHILADELPHIA, 

COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Theo, Leonhardt & Son, 

LITHOGRAPHERS. 

th and Library Sts., PHILA, 

Diplomas and Certificates of Membership. 
Also Commercial Work our Specialty, 



4 8 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



HOME EXERCISERS, 50 cents Up. 

Fine, firm, beautiful muscles ; the vigor of superb manhood ; the grace, suppleness an 
symmetry of perfect womanhood obtained through physical culture with the 

McFADDEN HEALTH EXERCISERS 

PATENTED i8<>7. 

when used as instructed in large 128 page instruction book, containing 53 full page half tones 
(5 by 8) illustrating development and exercises. Recommended by thousands of physicians and 
physical culture experts throughout America and Europe. Gives every conceivable motion. 
Each Exerciser fitted with changeable rubbers, adjustable strength from weakest child to 
strongest man. Noiseless. Better grades guaranteed two years. Weight two pounds. Complete 
gymnasium — can be used for Chest Weights, Rowing Machines, Intercostal Apparatuses, 
and Floor Pulley Machines. 



FRONT VIEW RIGHT ARM 
UNDEVELOPED 



BACK VIEW PROF. McFADDEN'S 
RIGHT ARM 



• •• 




Which arm does 
Yours Resemble? 



••• 




WHY HAVE AN ARM 
LIKE THIS? 



WHEN IT CAN JUST AS WELL BE 
FULLY DEVELOPED LIKE THIS. 



One High-Grade Exerciser will do for the Fami!y---the pull can be adjusted in a moment to 

suit the strength of anyone. 




Showing strong man using our high- 
grade exerciser, full strength, three 
strands, 30 to 50 lbs. Exerciser hung 
from ordinary door hinges. 



Showing lady using same exerciser 
adjusted to medium strength, two 
strands, 15 to :5(i lbs. 



ierciser 

adjusted to light strength, 
and nulling from floor, one si 
R to 5 lbs. 



Showing child using same p .' n y" er tefl 



Home Exercisers from 50 cents Upwards. 

McFADDEN TRAINING OUTFIT 

Complete, with 128 page Instruction Book, "McFadden's Physicial Training," #2 to #5- Se,1(i 
stamp for sample pages of large book and profusely illustrated and descriptive pamphlet, c 
taining high endorsements from prominent people" Liberal terms to agents everywhere, 
for our offer, "How to Get an Exerciser Free." Address, 

BUSINESS MANAGER OF COLLEGE FORUM. 



Write 



THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
R. A. MAULFAIR, Gen. Agt. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ALL THE LATEST AND BEST POLICIES ISSUED. 

TEACHERS. 

Union Teachers' Agencies of America. 

REV. L. D. BASS, D. D., MANAGER. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, 
La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C, 
San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, 111., St. 
Louis, Mo., and Denver, Colo. 

There are thousands of positions to be filled. 
We had over 8,000 vacancies last season. Un 
surpassed facilities for placing teachers in any 
part of the U. S. or Canada. One fee registers 
in nine offices. More vacancies than teachers. 

Address all Applications to Pittsburg, Pa. 



J. L. I.EMBBBGER, 



FRANK GLKTM. 



LEMBERGER & CO., 
DRUGGISTS and PHARMACISTS, 

9th and Cumberland Sts.. LEBANON, PA. 

Our claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of first importance — ACCURACY. 



80 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 



PATENTS 



TRADE MARKS* 

DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS &e. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, f ree, whether an invention is 
probably patentable. Communications strictly 
confidential. Oldest agency for securing patents 
In America. We have a Washineton office. 

Patents taken through Muun & Co. receive 
■pecial notice in the 

SOlEFUlFiG AMiQAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
any sci entiflo Journal, weekly, terms $3X0 a year : 
|l.yO six mouths. Specimen copies and HAND 
Book on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway, New York. 



I Translations 

Iiitei*al Inteirlineai*, 
67 Volumes. 

Dictionaries 

German, French, 
Italian, Spanish, 
Iiatin and Greek. 



Arthur Hinds & Co., 

4 Cooper Institute, NEW YORK. 



The Miller Organ 




Is the Finest and Best 
Organ Made. 



Sold all over the world 
upon its merits alone. 



SPECIAL 

INDUCEMENTS 

To Churches, Sunday 
Schools and Ministers. 



© Write to us and get our 
prices and terms. 
Catalogue, etc., free. 



MILLER ORGAN CO., 

LiEB AJMOJM, PR. 



RISE & GATES, 





DOUBLE YOUR. INCOME $ 

j by representing us during your leisure 4 1 
1 hours. j I 

\ SALARY PAID WEEKLY \ \ 

to those giving entire time to our work. < } 
Address, giving age, occupation £.nd<> 
reference, i > 

DODD, MEAD & CO., New York, j} 



142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON. 

Special Inducements To Students. 



Superior Advantages. 



Most Reasonable Rates. 



licbanon Valley College, 

FOUNDED 1866. 

pot* Liadies and Gentlemen. 

1. Thirty-second Year Opened with Double the Attendance 
last Year. 

Three Commodious Buildings ; Full Classical, Scientific 
and Musical Courses. 

2. An able Faculty ; High Standard ; Progressive Methods ; and a 
Well-selected Library. 

3. Environments of the Most Helpful Character in Social, Moral 
and Religious Life. 

4. A Fine Campus of about Ten Acres for Athletic Sports, and a 
well-equipped Gymnasium. 

Winter Term begins January 3d } Spring Term, March 28, 1896, 

address, rev. H. U. ROOP, Ph. D., President, 

Rnnville, Pa. 



Webster's 
International 
Dictionary 

The One Great Standard Authority, 

So writes Hon. D. J. Brewer, 
Justice U. S. Supreme Court. 

Successor of the 

"Unabridged." 

The Standard 

of the U. S. Gov't Printing 
Office, the U. S. Supreme 
Court, all the State Supreme 
Courts, and of nearly all the 
Schoolbooks. 

Warmly 
Commended 

by College Presidents, State 
Superintendents of Schools, 
and other Educators almost 
without number. 

THE BEST FOR PRACTICAL USE. 
It is easy to find the word wanted. 
It Is easy to ascertain the pronunciation. 
It is easy to trace the growth of a word. 
It is easy to learn what a word means. 

The Pennsylvania. School Tonrnalsays: 

— The International Webster is a treasure house 
of universal knowledge to which all the world, in 
all its ages, has made contribution, and any one 
of us may have it at his eloow. 

MF"*Specimen pages sent on application to 
G. A C. M15RRIAM CO., Publishers, 
Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 



A.C. Zimmerman, 

OEHltER Hi 





758 Cumberland Streei 
LEBANON, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis, 
Blank Book Manufacturer 

AND JOB BOOK BINDER. 



. . . RULING, 
NUMBERING, 



WIRE . . 
STITCHlNf 



112 and 1127 North Third St, 
HARFISBURG, PA. 



ollege 



IiEBflHON VAliliEY COLLEGE, 



AJN^iVlLtliE, PA. 

Rn al print, annville, pa. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

22 East Main St., ANNVILLR 



Oup Shelves awe constantly filled with 
JtHW, SHCOflD~HHr*I> and »HBUF WORN 

SCHOOL aqd COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, 



TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

STATIONERY, 
Wall PapetMrVindoua Shades. 



A Selected Stock of the LATEST STYLES OF WALL 
PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

We Buy, Sell, and Exchange Old 
and New Text Books. 



Vhe 97fan 



Who goes away should look as 
spruce as possible. Little things count 
— Neat Shirt, Collar, Cuffs, and a natty 
Tie, change a man wonderfully. You 
can get them all here. 

The latest ties in Puffs, Tecks, Four- 
in hands. Imperials at 50c ; Teck, Bow 
and String Ties at 25c. 

E. P. Anthony, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



new Commonwealth 

753 Cumberland St., 

LEBANON, PA. 4 

Makes it a special object to students in the 
way of a liberal discount to buy their SHOES 
of them. 



Sboc Store. 



Rroat Mucin flffor Send us the names and 
Ureal ITIUSIL Uliei. addresses of three or 
more performers on the p ano or organ, together with 
ten cents in silver or postage, and we will mail you five 
pieces full sheet music size, consisting of popular songs, 
waltzes, marches, etc., arranged for the piano and 
organ. Address 

CHICAGO BOOK & NEWS CO., 
215-221 Wabash Ave., E1CAGO, ILL. 



Shenk & Kinports, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Dealers in DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 
and Ladies' Dress Goods. 



Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home 
made, Ingrain, and Brussels Carpets. Yon 
buy cheaper from us than away from home, 
and have a large stock to select from. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Theo, Leonhardt & Son, 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

5th and Library Sts., PHILA, 



Diplomas and Certificates of Membership, 
Also Commercial Work our Specialty, 

A $300 Puzzle 

CUT THIS PICTURE OUT 

It contains the faces of a father and three daughter* ; you see 
the father, where are »he daughters? If your eyes are bright 
enough to find all three you are entitled to a reward. 

The proprietors of the 
SEED STORE will give 
FREE seven beautiful pic- 
tures ( GEMS for decorat- 
ing a home ) as a reward 
to anyone who can make 
out the three daughters' 
faces. 

These pictures were su- 
perbly executed IN 
COLORS by a firm of art 
publi shers who were 
obliged to liquidate their 
business, their productions 
being too expensive for 
these hard times, The en- 
tire stock was purchased 
by us, and what originally 
cost thousands of dollars 
will now be given away to attract attention to our national 
collection of flower seeds for the season of 1898. The pub- 
lished price of these pictures was $1.05, but we^willserd 
them ( a selected series of seven ) an a reward to EVERY person 
finding and marking the THREE daughters' faces with an X 
and enclosing the same with sixteen two-cent stamps for N» 
tional Collection No. 1, containing an immense variety of the 
choicest aud most beautiful flower seeds, Asters, Carnations, 
Pansies, Verbenas and thirty other varieties, also a large 
tion of finest International mixed Sweet Peas, Worlds Fair 
Medals Never before has it been possible to secure such » 
choice collection of the most fashionable flowers for so little) 
money. If you purchase your seeds from us one season we 
always have your orders. We guarantee perfect satisfaction or 
money refunded. $300 IN CASH PREMIUMS. The person 
sending as aliove whose envelope bears the EARLIEST l'0 #I 
mark will be given a $125 DIAMOND R1XG; to the SKCOS" 
$75 COLUMBIA BICYCLE; to THIRD $50 STANDARD BI- 
CYCLE; to FOURTH $15; and to the NEXT SEVEN willl« 
given $5 in gold. If able to find the three faces you shout 
answer promptly, and enclose at once with 16 2ct stamp 9 * 
you will receive the valuable lot of pietures and seeds by return 
mall. Address, VIRGINIA SEED BUREAU, Richmond, Vs.. 
P, O. Box 861. 




The College Forum. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OK 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ITS STUDENTS AND FRIENDS. 

oL. XT. No. 4. ANNVTLLE, PA., APEIL, 1898. Whole No. 110. 



THE PHILOSOPHER, 

In building np natur' he thought the Creator 
Had blundered unspeakably queer, 
nd he said he and Darwin and Billy McVarren 
Could prove the whole thing out of gear, 
"e said the whole pattern from Neptune to 
Saturn 

Was cut by a bungling design, 
And that no particular was plumb perpendicular, 
And exact every time to the line. 

e said that no critic, w-ith brain analytic, 
Could tolerate things that he saw. 
He said he would suffer if any old duffer 
Couldn't pick out a blemish or flaw, 
n v man with a cranium as big's a geranium 

Could see the whole thing was a botch, 
e where nature had blundered in points by 
the hundred 
In the space of five ticks of his watch. 

And so day and night he advised the Almighty 

With advice he believed of great worth, 
And his wife took in sewing to keep life agoing, 
While he superintended the earth. 

AMERICA— A CLIMAX, 

R. R. BUTTERWICK. 

In the beginning God said : "Let 
there be light." This was necessary 
1 drive away existing darkness. At 
le appearance of light the creative 
ler gy of the universe was set to work. 

I the same connection we read : "God 

ade two lights ; the greater to rule by 

a y, and the lesser to rule by night." 
pi 3 & 

ne most potent force as God saw it 

II creation was light. He saw that 



without light the machinery of nature 
could not be set in motion, also, that 
light was essential to continue it in 
motion when once begun. 

Thus God has given to man the 
light of the sun — the lesser light, and 
the light of understanding — the great- 
er light. 

The light of understanding is the 
one which God desired his people to 
utilize to its great extent. It is by the 
force of this light that man reaches 
the height of his ambition. If he 
refuses to use it he is doomed. 

If we have been careful readers as 
well as students, we have noticed a 
gradual advance in the history of na- 
tions. Issuing from the garden of 
Eden man was thrown upon his own 
resources. As the race increased in 
numbers certain wants became mani- 
fest which had to be satisfied in some 
way. Discontented in one place it 
moved to another, and then another. 
This increase continuing, and differ- 
ent families appearing, there arose a 
spirit of rivalry. This revealed to the 
existing families the importance of a 
leader or sheik. Thus we see devel- 
oped the first form of government. 

The Patriarchal form of government 
proved satisfactory as long as man 
continued to lead a nomadic life. 



5o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



This manner of life in course of time 
became distasteful to some, who desir- 
ed a more permanent place of abode. 
And now we see a number of families 
moving together forming a hamlet 
which finally becomes a city. As the 
race increases in like proportion also, 
do the cities increase in number. 
Each city has its own ruler. Envy 
arises among the rulers : war follows. 
The ruler of one city becomes the 
ruler of a number of cities. A union 
of these cities under one government 
was called a kingdom. Finally a 
number of these smaller kingdoms 
were absorbed into one large kingdom 
called an empire. Thus we see the 
systems of government worked out in 
the far distant Orient. Hence we see 
a number of petty kingdoms united to 
form the powerful Chaldean Empire 
which on account of its opulence and 
splendor the Prophet Daniel compared 
to a "head of gold." Chaldean su- 
premacy was overthrown by Cyrus the 
Great, founder of the Medo-Persian 
Empire. While these great empires 
were formed in the east there was in 
training farther west a race of people 
who were destined to astonished the 
world with their art, philosophy, liter- 
ature, and oratory. The nation which 
made possible a Socrates, a Plato, and 
an Aristotle, a Zeuxis and a Parrha- 
sius, and a Herodotus, and a Pindar 
and a Demosthenes, also produced an 
Alexander who proved to be to Darius 
Codomanus a General Grant. Darius 
fought his Appomattox on the field of 
Arbela in 331 B. C. With the fall of 
Darius fell also the Medo-Persian Em- 
pire. During the time of the Mace- 
donian supremacy, or the ''kingdom 



of brass," there was formed a nation 
which for its legal talent and martial 
power has been the watchword of the 
ages. Since Caesar crossed the R^j. 
con his name has been a synonym f 0r 
power. The "Kingdom of brass" w as 
conquered by a power still farther 
west, the Roman — the "Kingdon f 
iron and clay." Roman supremacy 
was overthrown by the tribes from the 
north under Odoacer in 476 A. D, 
while Romulus Augustus was Emper- 
or. "Thus we see kingdoms absorbed 
into empires, empires rose and fell by 
turns, each with a larger conception 
of the nation than its predecessor. 
From the crude combination of un- 
digested states in the Assyrian Empire 
to the orderly, assimilated, systematic 
condition of the Roman world was a 
great advance." 

Degrees of advance are visible from 
the nomadic state to the Assyrian, 
from the Assyrian to the Medo-Persian, 
from the Medo-Persian to the Mace- 
donian, from the Macedonian to the 
Roman, and its culmination was not 
reached until the founding of the Re- 
public of the United States of America. 
For centuries the voice of humanity 
has been clamoring for freedom — both 
civil and religious. America grants 
it. The founders of our Republic, 
though born and reared under the do- 
minions of kings, set the divine right 
of kings forever aside. 

God intended the United States of 
America to be the last great ruling 
power of the world. Thus He re- 
served her to be the last in discovery 
No government was permitted & ^ 
established upon her until the great* 
light had shown to man what % 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



5i 



j, cS t, and that was found to be a Re- 
publican form, or human equality. 

Unlimited resources abound here. 
Q lir coal fields can provide the world 
for a long time with fuel. Gold, sil- 
ver, copper, iron, zinc, lead, tin is 
here in inexhaustible quantities. The 
wide expanse of arable soil when fully 
cultivated will produce breadstuffs for 
the hungry mouths of a thousand mil- 
lion people. Our scenery is of unsur- 
passing beauty. The Italian boasts 
of the sunny hillsides and fragrant 
orange groves of Campania, the Amer- 
ican boasts of two Campanias. The 
Swiss boasts of his beautiful and trans- 
parent lakes and awe-inspiring moun- 
tains, but these sink into insignificance 
when we consider the Great Lakes on 
our northern frontier, and the tower- 
ing peaks of the Rockies. The Euro- 
pean never tires talking of the pictur- 
esque scenery along the course of the 
Rhine, but what of the Palisades of 
the Hudson, the link that joins Erie 
with Ontaria — the mighty Niagara, 
the Canyons of the Colorado, the 
"Gardens of the Gods," nature's mu- 
seum of wonders — the Yellowstone 
National Park, the mighty Amaleks 
of the forests of California, and the 
Yosemite Valley ! For long- rivers, 
beautiful water-sheds, picturesque 
sc enery, nature's curiousities, and good 
government, America leads the world. 

Quite significant also was the selec- 
tlQ n of the National bird made by our 
Others. As the eagle is the king 
among birds so America, if true to her 
estiny, is to become the mistress of 
ations. As the eagle soars higher in 
Us fli §ht than any other of God's 
lMn ged creatures so the American na- 



tion in the Providence of God is des- 
tined to outrival the nations of the 
world. 

Let the Italian delight in the sunny 
hillsides and fragrant orange groves 
of Campania; the Swiss admire his 
beautiful and transparent lakes and 
awe-inspiring peaks of the Alps ; the 
Frenchman and the German talk 
about the beauties of the Rhine, and 
the Englishman of his power, but as 
for me, give me free America. 

X 

THE NORMAN CONQUEST. 




The Norman Conquest of England, 
its results and influences upon English 
history has been phenomenal. Its 
consequences were most momentous, 
and they have in some form affected 
almost every phase of English histori- 
cal development. 

The rival prejudices of Norman and 
English writers make it difficult to 
decide which of the peoples was the 
more civilized. Norman literature be- 
fore the conquest was worthless ; their 
law courts have nothing to match the 
splendid series of Anglo-Saxon char- 
acters. But these are rather proofs 
that their civilization was modern than 
that it did not exist. For a century 
and a half English literature had been 
almost barren, while within thirty 
years the Italians Lanfranc Anselm 
had founded a school in Normandy 
which was unrivalled in its own days, 
and which almost reconstructed phil- 
osophical thought in Europe. The 
English were renowned throughout 
Europe for their perfection in the me- 
chanical arts and embroidery; but 
they imported their artists from Ger- 



52 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



many ; and they produced nothing in 
architecture to rival the magnificent 
castles and cathedrals which the Nor- 
mans scattered broadcast over the 
land. It seems certain that the Nor- 
mans were more cleanly in their habits 
and more courtly in their manners ; 
their vices were rather passionate than 
gross, and they ha:l the virtues of 
gentlemen — large-handedness and the 
love of adventure. Timid devotion 
bound the Englishman to his church, 
while a narrow insular spirit separated 
him from the European centre of re- 
ligion. The Norman distinguished 
better between the dues of Caesar and 
of God. He built churches and attend- 
ed mass ; but he dTew a line between 
the citizen and the priest which the 
latter was never allowed to overpass. 
He connected the country with Eu- 
rope and Roman law, but he kept it 
free from foreign tyranny. The Ital- 
ian legate or tax gatherer might ven- 
ture here under a weak king, but the 
barons repeatedly drove him back or 
foiled him ; and under an able sov- 
ereign — Henry II or Edward I — the 
see of Rome was limited to its natural 
functions of directing the European 
church and adjusting the law of na- 
tions. To sum up all, England with- 
out the Normans would have been 
mechanical, not artistic ; brave, not 
chivalrous ; a state governed by its 
priests instead of a state controlling its 
church. It had lost the tradition of 
Roman culture, and during half a cen- 
tury of peace had remained barren of 
poets, legislators and thinkers. We 
owe to Normandy the builder, the 
knight, the schoolman and the states- 
man. 



The results, then, of this invasion 
brought England into closer relations 
with the continental powers, — her Ian. 
guage and her system of government 
underwent essential changes. The 
Normans were a Northern or Scandi- 
navian race who settled in Northern 
France, called, after them, Normandy. 
They were originally pirates and dep. 
redators, but, after their settlement in 
France, they came into contact with 
the Roman culture, adopted the Ro- 
man tongue, formed out of the decay- 
ing Latin, and became a civilized peo- 
ple. The Normans were one of the 
most chivalrous and adventurous races 
of the middle ages and many of the 
finer elements of English character 
may be traced to their influence. The 
Danes, who settled in England in 
Anglo-Saxon times, and the Normans, 
originally belonged to the same race. 



ORTHOEPY AND ORTHOGRAPHY, 



Should the professors be looking 
about for something interesting ana 1 
instructive for their rhetoricals the 
will find the following selection quite 
a sufficiency for one session. 

"A sacrilegious son of Belial, who 
suffered from bronchitis, having ex- 
hausted his finances, in order to &w 
good the deficit, resolved to allay hu"" 
self to a comely, lenient and docile 
young lady of the Malay or Caucasian 
He accordingly purchased 



race. 



i ft 



calliope and coral necklace of a chain* 
leon hue, and securing a suite of r° 0111 
at a principal hotel he engaged tH 
head waiter as a coadjutor. He tl ieC 
dispatched a letter of the most excel 
tional caligraphy extant, inviting 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



53 



voting 1 a matinee. She revolt- 
ed at ^: - i, refused to consider her- 
■Jf sacrificable to his desires, and sent 
a polite note of refusal ; on receiving 
w hich he procured a carbine and 
bowie-knife, said that he would not 
n0 w forge letters hymeneal with the 
queen, went to an isolated spot, sever- 
ed his jugular vein and discharged the 
contents of the carbine into his abdo- 
men. The debris was removed by the 
coroner." 



ATHLETICS, 



3£T 

THE JUNIOR ANNUAL, 



It may be necessary to remind the 
alumni whom this reaches that quite 
a number of them have not responded 
to the request recently sent them ask- 
ing for a short biographical sketch of 
their lives for publication in the An- 
e ' | nual. This may not seem in keeping 
| with the usual make-up of such pub- 
cations, but since this will be the 
it of its kind in the history of the 
College, it has been thought wise to 
appropriate one department entirely 
to the alumni. The book will con- 
sist of about one hundred and sixty 
Pages, and will be artistically printed 
°n extra quality of paper and bound 
* board cover with the College colors. 
Besides containing the usual informa- 
tion in such books, it will be beauti- 
fy illustrated with a number of 
'alf-tones and zinc etchings of the 
Acuity, classes, and college buildings. 

The price of the Annual will be one 
dollar per copy. The business man- 
a § e r is highly pleased with the num- 
her of orders already sent in by friends 
of the College. Address all orders to 
^- G. Clippinger, business manager. 




Great interest is being manifested 
in all kinds of athletics. The base 
ball team is one of the strongest we 
have had for years and under the cap- 
tainship of Douglass we look forward 
for a victorious season. 

The two tennis courts have been 
cleaned and placed in condition for 
playing. A large number have al- 
ready joined the club. 

A relay team has been at work 
practicing daily to take part in the 
relay races which will be given in 
Carlisle by Dickinson College and in 
which we were invited to participate. 
Those who have entered for practice 
thus far are C. V. Clippinger, R. D. 
Burtner, h. Gass and Mr. Arnfield. 

EXCHANGES. 

Fretz — "Say Hadley, Miss Camp- 
bell smiled at me today." 

Hadley — "Yes ! She was too polite 
to laugh out loud." — Ex. 

Senior — One who rides a pony in 
the race for a sheepskin. 

Junior — One who knows it all and 
tries to teach the faculty. 

Soph-o-more — A wise person ; one 
of nature's noblemen. 

Fresh-man — A rejected subject from 
Hades — too green to burn. — Ex. 

Several of the college papers to 
which the Forum is sent have not, as 
yet, sent their own in return. We 
might name the Dickinsonian, Mer- 
cury (Gettysburg), Bucknell Mirror. 
We hope the editors will see that their 
paper is sent to us. 



54 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Of. all mean words of weal or woe, 
The meanest are these : "She told 
me to go." 

The young man who steals a kiss 
from a handsome girl is guilty of 
pretty larceny. 

A bet with a woman is called a 
"jaw-bone bet," because she never 
puts up any money. 

"Take away woman," shouted the 
orator, "and what would follow ?" 
"We would," said a man at the back 
of the audience promptly. — Ex. 

Among the well edited high school 
exchanges we receive none, excel the 
"High School Times." It is in many 
respects equal, if not superior to some 
of our college exchanges. 

Visitor — Is your son taking a very 
thorough course in college ? 

Fond Mother — Indeed, he is. The 
poor fellow is really too conscientious. 
This is his fourth year in the Fresh- 
man Class and they tell me there is a 
great deal there that he can learn yet. 

Professor in English class — " I will 
read a sentence and you may punctu- 
ate it properly. ' The beautiful girl, 
for such was she, was passing down 
the street.' " 

Student — "I think, professor, that 
I would make a dash after the beauti- 
ful girl." 

The "Pennington Seminary Re- 
view" for March contains many good 
literary productions, notable among 
which are two excellent poems. One 
of these "God is Love" is particularly 
fine. The other "The Destruction of 
the Maine" is filled with the patriotism 
now^so prevalent in our country. 



The tears of affection are dew-dro 
from the blue sky of the soul. 

The last number of the "Otterbe 
^Egis" is an unusually strong one. 
contains a well written review 
"Quo Vadis" also two articles on 
partment work in Otterbein. 
should not some one write up dep 
ment work in L. V. C. ? 

Regularity, punctuality, neaur 
cleanliness, obedience, kindness, 
liteness are the essential school virtues 
to every young man or woman who 
would have a successful career in school 
and a career beyond the school. 

Were half the power that fills the 

world with terror, 
Were half the wealth, bestowed on 

camps and courts, 
Given to redeem the human mind 

from error, 
There were no need of arsenals or 

forts. — Longfellow. 

Those who have never had any 
clear conception of just what a blush 
is will be pleased with the following 
lucid definition by a Cincinnati doc- 
tor : "A blush is a temporary ery- 
ethema and calorific effulgence of the 
physiognomy, setiologized by the per- 
spectiveness of the sensorium when m 
a predicament of unequilibrity from 3 
sense of shame, anger or other cau" 
eventuating in a paresis of the v" 
motor nervous filaments of the fa 
capillaries, whereby, being divert 
of their elasticity, they are suffused 
with radient, eminating from an 111 
timidated praecordia." 

Our greatest treasures are oft 
found under our greatest troubles- 



1 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



A FRESH HAMLET'S SOLILOQUY, 

flunk or not a flunk — that is the question ; 
ether 'tis nobler in the mind to enter 
class-room and take a zip, 
Or to pony and take a ten. 
And by ponying pass ? To pass — to flunk — 
T o more, and by passing to say we end 
e horrid fear and a thousand shames 
at flunking would incur — 'tis a consumma- 
tion 

jly to be wished. To pass — to flunk — 
pony ! perchance to be caught ! ay, there's 
the rub ; 

For in that direction, what horrors may come ! 
That's what makes ponying so apprehensive ; 
For who would bear the scoffs and jeers of col- 
lege, 

The professor's scorn, the bright student's ridi- 
cule, 

e pangs of mocking and unsuccessful effort, 
e reproach of this class and the spurns 
His family would heap upon him, 
When he himself might safely pass 
With a few notes ? Who would tax his mind 
And grunt and sweat wearily over books, 
But that the dread of something following, 
Makes us rather think of awful grinding 
Than to leap the gulf with a pony ? 
Thus fear of "fire" makes cowards of us all ; 
And thus the mighty power of resolution 
Is vanquished by the ghastly thought 
Of the Prof's good eye-sight at Exams, 
And venturers of great risk and issue, 
With this regard, expire ignominously 
' And lose the name of action. — Ex. 

ALUMNI ET ALUMNAE, 

Rev. Ira E. Albert, A.B., '97, spent 
a few days in town attending to im- 
portant business. 

p rof. W. H.Kindt, A.M., '89, Presi- 
nt of Schuylkill Seminary, Fred- 
ric ksburg, Pa., visited his Alma 
(Hater. 

R ev. G. K. Hartman, A.B., '94, was 
Gained to the office of an elder at 
t J le last session of the Pennsylvania 
inference. 



55 

C. E. Geyer, A.B., '82, one of the 
leading attorneys in Catawissa, Pa., 
spent a few days in the home of his 
Alma Mater. 

Rev. Joseph Dougherty, B.S., '89, 
brother to Prof. B. F. Dougherty, pas- 
tor of a United Brethren Church, at 
Baltimore, Md., was with us. 

Prof. S. O. Goho, A.M., '82, deliv- 
ered a very interesting and instructive 
address before a local teachers' insti- 
tute, held at Annville, on ''American 
Progress." 

Mr. Urban H. Hershey, '95, former- 
ly teacher of music at Manheim, Pa., 
but now a sttident in the College of 
Music, New York City, called on 
friends in town. 

Miss Bertha Mumma, B.S., '96, has 
been elected assistant professor of 
mathematics by the authorities of 
Schuylkill Seminary. She takes 
charge of her work with the beginning 
of the spring term. 

Prof. O. E. Good, A.M., '94, for- 
merly professor of Natural Science at 
Lebanon Valley College, will be with 
us during the spring term. He will 
do some teaching, and pursue post- 
graduate work. 

H. B. Stehman, A.M., M.D., '73, 
superintendent of Presbyterian Hos- 
pital at Chicago, 111., is an honored 
alumnus of L. V. C. Though gradu- 
ated a quarter of a century ago he yet 
remembers his Alma Mater. He has 
assisted the College in varions ways 
since his graduation. These tokens 
of remembrance from the alumni are 
held in great esteem by the College. 



56 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The College Forum, 



THE COLLEGE FOFUM is published monthly 
throughout the college year by the Philokosmian 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



O. P. DeWitt, '9\ Editor-in-Chief. 
Jay W. Yoe, '98. C. E. Snoke, '00. 

C. V. Cl.IPPINGER, '99. R. R. BllTTERWK'K . '01. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, Business Manager. 

S. F. Daugherty, '00, Assistant Business Manager. 

Terms : Twentyfive cents a year, five cents a copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to 
all subscribers until an order is received for its dis' 
continuance, and until all arrearages have been paid. 



Address all communications, articles lor publication, 
exchanges, etc., to W. G. Clippinger, Box 8(j, Ann- 
ville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second- 
class mail matter. 



EDITORIALS. 



The spring term opens np very au- 
spiciously. Twenty-five new students 
have already registered and ten or fif- 
teen more are expected before another 
week rolls by. To see the busy wheel 
of progress about the institution in a 
thousand and one ways ; to see the old 
and new students full of zeal and de- 
termination ; all portends a spirit of 
thrift and advancement, such as old 
L. V. C. has not witnessed for many a 
day. Let the good work go on. It 
only remains for the student to ap- 
point himself a committee of one to 
see that his studies shall not be neg- 
lected. Dr. Roop made some very 
appropriate remarks at chapel on 
Tuesday morning. Ivach student 
should heed his words. When the 
building shall have been finished as to 



its paint ; when the new music 
shall have been dedicated and when 
the other additions and repairs in and 
about the different buildings shal 
have been completed, then shall we be 
truly glad to extend a welcome greet- 
ing to the absent ones that they, too, 
may see our progress. Our president 
gave very Encouraging reports from 
the Virginia conference Shenandoah 
Institute will in the future arrange i 
course to fit its students for L,. V. C. 
Great interest has been shown every- 
where toward the institution which 
the church is, indeed, trying to build 
up. The president has also conducted 
College Day exercises at many points 
in this section of the state. The fol- 
lowing are some of the places : Union 
Deposit, Memorial and Derry Street 
Churches in Harrisburg, Fishburn's, 
Derry, Lebanon Trinity, and Grant- 
ville. 

INFLUENCE OF NOBLE WOMEN. 



It was Jeremy Taylor who said that 
women entering certain avocations of 
human life cast a die of the greatest 
interest in the world next to the thro 
of eternity. The companionship 
good women enables men to gain 11 
sweetness and in moral height and 
does not cause them in the least de 
gree loose "the wrestling thews whic 
throw the world." Weak men 
displayed public virtues and strong 
men have been made stronger becaus 
they had by their side a woman 
noble character who exercised a fort 1 ' 
fying influence on their conduct. 

Frances K. Willard was one of taos 
noble women who yave her life for 1 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



57 



uplifting of humanity. Although she 
lie ver married such was her life and 
influence that the whole world mourns 
the loss of such an one who stooped to 
the lowest dregs of human existence 
to lift up fallen humanity into a higher 
and nobler plane. A volume might 
be written concerning her useful and 
remarkable career. Her fame as a 
temperance advocate is world wide, 
and her influence as a leader and of- 
ficer in the great national and inter- 
national temperance and Christian 
movements will go to the end of time. 

She was born in Churchville, N. Y., 
Sept. 28, 1839. Died Feb. 18, 1898, 
at the Hotel Empire, New York City. 
Her writings have done much to in- 
fluence young women in the right di- 
rection and point out the way to the 
young and innocent. She wrote 
"Glimpses of Fifty Years," "How to 
Win," (a book for girls); "Nineteen 
Beautiful Years," "A Great Mother," 
etc. The following portrays her great 
heart and her desire to give happiness 
to the lowly : "I will speak more 
kindly and considerately to those 
whose claims are unrecognized by the 
society in which I live, than I will to 
others. I will bow more cordially to 
those to whom persons of position do 
not bow at all and I will try in a thou- 
a nd, nameless ways to make them 
a Ppier. God help me to keep my 
romise good !" 

PERSONALS, 

A. Weir, '00, spent Sunday, Mar. 
6tn > at his home in Lititz. 

bishop Kephart gave a good lecture 
"Life's Battles"' on the 24th. 



Dr. Miller gave a lecture on "Social 
Ethics," on the morning of March 2d. 

Miss Edith Grabill, '59, was home 
visiting her parents in Lancaster on 
Feb. 29th. 

Mr. A. U. Baer, '98, was visiting his 
parents at Reading a few days during 
the month. 

Mrs. O. P. De Witt has gone on an 
extended visit with friends and rela- 
tives in Ohio and Missouri. 

Messrs. Hoy and C. E. Snoke had 
charge of the Latin Department dur- 
ing Prof. Dougherty's illness. 

C. V. Clippinger, '99, left on Sun- 
day evening, Mar. 20 to visit his par- 
ents who reside in Taney town, Md. 

H. L. Eichinger preached for Rev. 
C. A. Burtner in the Otterbein Church 
in Harrisburg, Sunday morning, Mar. 
6th. 

Rev. Dohner conducted chapel ex- 
ercises on Mar. 10th and gave a very 
interesting talk on the value of higher 
education. 

Prof. Dougherty, William Roop and 
A. Krone were confined to their rooms 
for a few days during the month on 
account of sickness. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, occupied the 
pulpit of the 'Centenary Methodist 
Church, in Lebanon, both morning 
and evening, Mar. 20th. 

President Roop, W. G. Clippinger, 
Mrs. S. F. Daugherty, Miss Irene 
Smith, Miss Anna Snyder, Urias 
Daugherty and Mr. Kauffnian were in 
attendance at the Pennsylvania An- 
nual Conference held at Dallastown. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



58 

O. P. DeWitt, '98, made a business 
trip to Harrisburg the 16th. While 
there he called on his friend, Dr. 
Samuel Baer, principal of the Harris- 
burg High School. 

J. J. Lewis, one of the greatest lec- 
turers on the platform in recent years, 
appeared in the College Chapel on 
Wednesday evening, Mar. 9th, and de- 
livered his famous lecture on the "Pas- 
sion Play" to a crowded house. This 
wonderful lecture was illustrated with 
numerous magnificent views. This 
was the last lecture of the course. 

Among those who took part in the 
concert given by the Mt. Gretna 
Choral, under the leadership of Prof. 
Lowe, in the Memorial U. B. Church, 
Harrisburg, Friday evening, Mar. 4th, 
were Mrs. Roop, Misses Mary and 
Annie Kreider, Miss Emma Batdorf, 
Miss Anna Myers, and W. G. Clip- 
pinger. 

Mrs. Prof. H. U. Roop entertained 
a company of friends at her home, on 
the evening of March 14. The fol- 
lowing very interesting program was 
rendered : 

A Gipsy Maiden, Parker. 

Mrs. H. U. Roop. 
Impromptu Galop, Manotte. 
Mrs. B. F. Daugherty and Mrs. O. P. DeWitt. 
Les deux Alouettes, Leschetizky . 

Miss Carrie E. Smith. 
Recitation, Selected. 

Miss Hattie V S. Shelley. 
Vocal Solo, Selected. 

Mr. Morris Brightbill. 
Dreams of the Past, Morrison. 

Mrs. B. F. Daugherty. 
Lover's Complaint, Zourkwizkie. 
Prof. J. E. Lehman, Rev. D. S. Eshleman, 
Dr. H. U. Roop, Prof. B. F. 
Daugherty. 



College Day was fittingly observe 
in the U. B. Church on Sunday, Mar 
6th. In the morning Rev. Dohn 
preached. In the evening the exe 
cises were varied, consisting of short 
talks, solos, College quartette, and an- 
thems by the choir. After both ser- 
vices large sums of money were raised 

Who Would Wear a Crown, 

Out of 2,540 emperors and kin 
ruling sixty nations, 229 were de- 
throned, 64 abdicated, 20 committed 
suicide, 11 went mad, 100 died on the 
battlefield, 123 were made prisoners, 
25 were pronounced martyrs and 
saints, 157 were assasinated, 62 wer 
poisoned and 108 sentenced to death 
total, 963. "Uneasy rests the hea 
that wears a crown." 

Courting is like two little streams 
of soft water that steal out from under 
a rock at the foot of a mountain and 
run down the hill side by side singin 
and dancing and spattering each other, 
eddying and frothing and cascading, 
now hiding under bank, now full of 
sun and now full of shadow, until by 
and by they join and then go slow. 

Jones was dead, and a bulletin stat 
ing, "George S. Jones had departe 
this life for Heaven at 12 M.," W 
posted by a sympathetic family on the 
door. A passing wag, full of mischief, 
posted on a telegraph sheet under that 
of the family, "Heaven, 12.30 P. 
Jones not yet arrived. Excitement 
intense." — Ex. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



59 



AMONG THE SOCIETIES, 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 



/ trtute et Fide. 



Leah C. Hartz, '99, Editor. 

The winter term has sped swiftly 
by, nothing occnring to mar the felic- 
ity of onr Clio girls. Now comes gen- 
tle spring with her soft breezes, buds 
and blossoms ; bringing new enthu- 
siasm and a more intense desire of 
promoting literary culture. 

On the evening of March 25th we 
held a joint session with the P. L. S., 
which was very interesting as well as 
instructive. 

At almost every session this term, 
some of our gentlemen from both so- 
cieties visited us, and made excellent 
addresses. 

At a called meeting, the following 
resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, In the all-wise providence of Hini 
who never errs, the messenger Death with his 
icy sickle has cut down a flower of rare worth 
and excellence, Hattie h-ane. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we, members of the Clionian 
Literary Society, do deeply mourn our loss, and 
in token of our sorrow drape our hall in mourn- 
ing for thirty days and each member wear crape 
for that length of time. 

Resolved, That, although she is missed, we 

-heve our loss to be her gain, and submit our 
Wishes, as she did, to the will of the all-wise 
Father. 

Resolved, That we extend to the sorrowing 
Parents and friends our tenderest sympathy. 

Resolved, That a copy of the obituary and 
these resolutions be sent to the parents and 
Polished in the CoEEEGK Forum and the Ann- 
v,1 'e Journal. MakvB. Kkeidek, 

I'l.OKA Ma\SII,I,1 S, 

Susie S. Mover, 

Committee. 



KALOZETEAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 



Palma Non Sine Pulvere. 



Wiluam J. Sanders, Editor. 

That things done by halves are 
never done right, should be everlast- 
ingly impressed on the minds of those 
who have society duties to perform, 
and then we think the results would 
be much more pleasing to our society 
and to ourselves. We do not mean to 
criticize the work of any of the mem- 
bers, as individuals, but merely to 
offer the suggestion, that we in the 
future, as a society, attempt to do even 
better work than we have done in the 
past term. For application and thor- 
oughness are the two requisites for 
success in whatever line of study or 
work we are engaged. Then let us 
work more heartily for the best inter- 
ests of the society and for our own ad- 
vancement along literary lines ; and 
in the end we may look over, at least, 
one portion of* our college training and 
truthfully say, U I have done my best." 

We are glad to note that the society 
is gradually growing in numbers, hav- 
ing, during the last term, added two 
new names to our roll. To these gen- 
tlemen, Messrs. Arnfield and Kreiser, 
we extend a most cordial welcome and 
hope that the society home they have 
chosen may be of value and profit to 
them. 

The twenty-first anniversary of the 
Kalozeteau Literary Society will be 
held in the College Chapel on April 9. 
An account of the exercises will ap- 
pear in the next issue of the FORUM, 



6o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



PHILOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST, 



"Esse Quam Videri.' 1 '' 

Ralph D. Rkider, 'oo, Editor. 

The self-taught statesmen of our 
country received their education in 
the lyceum, stump speaking, the 
granges, agricultural meetings, and 
many other organizations of like na- 
ture. All are only so many literary 
societies. We often see newspaper 
articles ridiculing local debating so- 
cieties. True the college lyceum has 
better opportunities but both in their 
way cultivate facility of expression 
and accomplishment second only to 
knowledge itself. To be an American 
citizen is a great inheritance and he 
who is able to raise his voice success- 
fully on the stupendous questions 
agitating a great nation will receive 
renown as surely as the great heroes of 
war. 

A joint session was held with the 
Clios during the month, which was an 
entire success and was appreciated by 
everybody present. 

As we review the events of the past 
term and see the success that the so- 
ciety has achieved we are stimulated 
to try to win new laurels for our 
society home. 

The prospects are very encouraging 
for a large number of new students foi 
the spring term. We invite them all 
to come and visit the Philo society. 

Cultivation that permits not the 
conscience to stano erect is not worthy 
of the name. 



It costs $555 to be buried in West- 
minister Abbey. 

Journalism is advancing. Pictures 
have been sent to certain daily papers 
over the wires for 150 miles. 

In some parts of China the young 
women wear their hair in a long 
single plait, v/ith which is entwined a 
bright scarlet thread. This style of 
ornamentation denotes that the young 
lady is marriageable. 

A determination of Professor Bar- 
nard with the Lick telescope places 
the diameter of Neptune at 32,900 
miles — from 2000 to 4000 miles less 
than is stated in most text books. 

The longest distance that a shot 
has been fired is a few yards more 
than fifteen miles, which was the 
range of Krupp's 130-ton steel gun. 
The shot required for this gun 
weighed 2,600 pounds. 

The Roman Catholic Cathedral now 
being erected in London will be 360 
feet long, 156 feet wide, and will have 
an area of 55,000 square feet. Its 
nave will have an area of 14,000 square 
feet. 

Russia has decided to build a gigan- 
tic canal connecting the Black sea and 
the Baltic. The canal, as projected, 
is to connect Riga, on the Baltic 
with Cherson, on the Dnieper riven 
near the Black sea. It is to be 1,000 
miles long, 2 13. 213 feet wide at the 
surface and 114 fe et at the base, with 
a depth of 27.9 feet. The largest 
battleships in th< 1 world will be able 
to pass through it.. 



r_i_ 

tunnel which man ever attempted to 
construct. When completed, which 
will be in 1904, it will be fifty miles 
long. Every foot of it will be under 
pike's Peak and the mountains that 
tower on each side. The starting point 
is near the old town of Colorado City 
and will terminate within a few miles 
of Cripple Creek. 

The Christian world was greatly 
moved recently by the discovery of 
ancient papyri in Egypt at Behesna, 
120 miles south of Cairo. These 
writings, which were dug out of the 
soil of Egypt, date back to the year 
93 A.D. There are about a dozen 
leaves each 5^ by 3^ inches in size, 
remarkably well preserved, and clearly 
written in uncial characters of ancient 
Greek. These sayings each begin 
with the words, u Jesus saith." They 
will be printed in a cheap form so that 
they can be widely circulated. 

As a youth Daniel Webster seemed 
somewhat opposed to physical labor, 
but he was quick at repartee. While 
mowing he complained to his father 
that his scythe was not hung properly. 
"Hang it to suit yourself, Dan," re- 
plied the paternal. The boy imme- 
diately hung it on a tree near by, say- 
ing, "There, father, it's hung to suit 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



me now." 



a; 



All desiring the new song, Ri Ko- 
n -i, Ri Ko-ri-i, etc., apply to Messrs. 
Deibler and Runk. 



He that knows not when to be si- 
lent knows not when to speak 



He who can compose himself is wis- 
er than he who composes books. 



Hope matses for every man a gold- 
en tomorrow that brightens the dark 
today. It shines through the ttars of 
the present to span the future with its 
bow of promise. 



Nature loves truth so well, that it 
hardly ever admits of flourishing. 
Conceit is to nature what paint is to 
beauty ; it is not only needless, but 
impairs what it would improve. — 
Pope. 



"Quo Vadis" means "whither goest 
thou?" It is part of the question ad- 
dressed to the Lord by Saint Peter 
when he was flying from Rome to 
escape martyrdom. The Lord met 
him on the road outside the city, and 
replied to his question that he was go- 
ing back to the city to be crucified 
over again since his apostles had 
proved recreant. 



Rensselaer 



Polytechnic^/\ 
Institute, 

Troy, N.Y. 



L^cal examinm ions provided for. Send for a Catalogua 



TEACHERS 

who Clin fill nr.,„w™,w„r ■.„»,.« 



Desiring positions in any State in the- Union should write to us. We charge no com- 
mission or salary for our services. Life membership and duplicate registi ation for one 
fee. Graduate students in great demand. 100 good teachers wanted immediately, 
RenlftT 11 ? \ emergency vacancies in Penn'a. on short notice. Address, h. H. hopkins & CO., Hancock, Md. 
presented in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston, Denver, New Orleans, Philadelphia and Atlanta. 2-5mo. 





62 



the college forum. 



E, B. MARSHALL, M.D. 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

HARRY ZIMMERMAN, D.D.S., 
DENTAL ROOMS, 

72 West Main Street, ANNVILLE. PA. 



JACOB SARGENT, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR. 

1 8 and 20 West Hain St., ANNVILLE. 



WILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, ANNVILLE, PA. 



F, W. FROST, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



KREIDER & CO., 



H. H. KREIDER. 
JNO. E. HERR. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard L Soft Coal ( Grain, Seeds, Salt & Feed, 

Office: Railroad St., near Depot. a mmwtt t c da 
Telephone Connection. A IN IN V ILLc, fA. 



Qnowflake printing house, 

^ A. C. M. HIESTER, Prop. 

FINE JOB PRINTING 

North White Oak Street, ANNVILLE, PA 



WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GEN- 
tlemen or ladies to travel for responsible, 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses. Posi- 
tion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago. 



ene Oas. 

THE LIGHT OF THE FUTURE. 

Why not be independent and own your own 
little gas plant which will give four times more 
light than ordinary gas or electric lights at one 
half the cost ? Applicable for use in churches, 
stores, factories, hotels, residences and country 
homes ; safer than ordinary gas or kerosene lamps, 
Approved by all the Boards of Underwriters 
throughout the United States. We want a first 
class agent in every town, Write for catalogue 
and prices. 



THE HCETYLENE 

AKRON, OHIO. 



E CO., 



J, R. McCAULEY. 

DAILY MEAT MARKET, 

GOOD MEAT— LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, Pa 

S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS. 

One door West Penn'a. House, Annville. 



M. H. SHAUD, 

— DKAI.EIt IN — 

Gold Watches and Jecuelpy, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer m 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYSTERS 
AND CREAM. AJiriVIUliE, PR. 

If you want to Buy a Hat Fight, and a Right Hat, 
or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

00 T0 Erb & Craumer, 

Eighth and Cumb. Sts„ LEBANON, PA, 



DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING, 

PHOTOENGRAVING. 

Penn'a, Engraving Co,, 

114420 S. 7th St., PHILADELPHIA. 

COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



I860. 



J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT, 

S. W. Corner 8th and Willow, LEBANON, 



m~A~LL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
FURNITURE & UNDERTAKING, 

West Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

H, S. WOLF. 

DEALER IN 

Green Groceries and Confectioneries- 

RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



63 



Eastman Business College 

Has in its half a century of work 
developed the capacity of thousands 
into well-trained men, capable to fill 
every department of a business career. 
Known everywhere for the thorough- 
ness of the preparation given in the 
least time at the smallest expense. 



The System of Teaching 

Is based on actual daily experience 
in every branch of business, includ- 
ing Merchandising, Bookkeeping, 
Banking, Commercial Law, Penman- 
ship, Correspondence. Arithmetic, 
Telegraphy, Stenography, Type-writ- 
mg, etc., etc. ^ 




The Journal or the Annual Catalogue will inter- 
est you. Write for it. Address 

CLEMENT C. GAINES, President. 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



'M 



Young Men Trained 



To be all-around business men : — or 
they may take up a special branch of 
business and be THOROUGH in that. 

No better illustration of the value of 
a business education can be offered 
than the success of those who have 
graduated from Eastman College. 

By the old way, training for business 
was acquired through years of ap- 
prenticeship, but the successful man 
of today is the one who enters the 
field prepared for the work he is to do 
by the new and shorter methods of 
Eastman College, the model business 
school. 



A Thorough Business Man 



Is the description of the man who 
becomes successful, is known and has 
the confidence of the community. 

BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with com- 
petent assistants. Situations secured 
without charge, for all graduates of 
the Business and Short-hand Courses, 
an invaluable feature to many young 
people. Open all the year. Time 
short. Terms reasonable. Address 
as above. 



6 4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



HOME EXERCISERS, 50 cents Up. 

Fine, firm, beautiful muscles ; the vigor of superb manhood ; the grace, suppleness an 
symmetry of perfect womanhood obtained through physical culture with the 

McFADDEN HEALTH EXERCISERS 

PATENTED i«Q7- 

when used as instructed in large 128 page instruction book, containing 53 full page half ■ 
(5 by 8) illustrating development and exercises. Recommended by thousands of physicians an, 
physical culture experts throughout America and Europe. Gives ever}' conceivable motion 
Each Exerciser fitted with changeable rubbers, adjustable strength from weakest child 
strongest man. Noiseless. Better grades guaranteed two years. Weight two pounds. Cotnple 
gymnasium — can be used for Chest Weights, Rowing Machines, Intercostal Apparatus 
and Floor Pulley Machines. 



FRONT VIEW RIGHT ARM 
UNDEVELOPED 



BACK VIEW PROF. McFADDEI* 
RIGHT ARM 




• •• 



Whieh arm does 
Youths Resemble ? 




WHY HAVE AN ARM 
LIKE THIS? 



WHEN IT CAN JUST AS WELL L 
FULLY DEVELOPED LIKE THIS. 



One High-Grade Exerciser will do for the Family— the pull can be adjusted in a moment to 

suit the strength of anyone. 




Showing strong man using our high- 
grade exerciser, full strength, three 
strands, 30 to 60 lbs. Exerciser hung 
from ordinary door hinges. 



Showing lady using same exerciser 
adjusted to medium strength, two 
strands, 15 to 30 lbs. 



Showing child using same ""fl 
adjusted to light strength, m«6? 
and pulling from floor, one stf" 
3 to 5 lbs. 



Home Exercisers from 50 cents Upwards. 

McFADDEN TRAINING OUTFIT 

Complete, with 128 page Instruction Book, "McFadden's Physicial Training," $2 to $5- 
stamp for sample pages of large book and profusely illustrated and descriptive pamphlet, ^° 
taining high endorsements from prominent people. Liberal terms to agents everywhere, 
for our offer, "How to Get an Exerciser Free." Address, 

BUSINESS MANAGER OF COLLEGE FORUM. 



THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS, 
A, MAULFAIR, Gen. Agt 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ALL THE LATEST AND BEST POLICIES ISSUED. 



TEACHERS. 

Union Teachers' Agencies of America. 

REV. L. D. BASS, D. D., MANAGER. 

: 



■ 



ittsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, 
La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C, 
San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, 111., St. 
Louis, Mo., and Denver, Colo. 

There are thousands of positions to be filled. 
We had over 8,000 vacancies last season. Uu 
surpassed facilities for placing teachers in any 
part of the U. S. or Canada. One fee registers 
in nine offices. More vacancies than teachers. 
Address all Applications to Pittsburg, Pa. 



L. LEMBEROEK. 



FRANK GLKIM. 



LEMBERGER & CO., 
DRUGGISTS and PHARMACISTS. 



Our claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of first importance— ACCURACY. 



80 YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE. 



Patents 



TRADE MARKS, 
OESICNS, 
COPYRICHT8 &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertui n, free, whether an Invention is 
Probably patentable. Communications strictly 
confidential. Oldest agency for securing patents 
iu America. We have a Washington office. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the 

t SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
any scientific journal, veekly, terms $3.00 a year; 
♦i-^isix months. Specimen copies and Hand 
°oo& on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway. New York. 

jlj DOUBLE YOUR INCOME $ 

flj by representing us during your leisure J 
W hours. X 

JSALARY PAID WEEKLY I 

tothosegiving entiretimetoourwork.^ 
Address, giving age, occupation r.ruHt 
^ reference, W 
I DODD, MEAD & CO., New York.* 



The Miller Organ 




Is the Finest and Best 
Organ Made. 



Sold all over the world 
upon its merits alone. 



SPECIAL 

INDUCEMENTS 

To Churches, Sunday 
Schools and Ministers. 



Write to us and get our 
prices and terms. 
Catalogue, etc., free. 



MILLER ORGAN CO., 



LEBANON, pa. 



RISE & GATES, 

PHOTO ARTISTS 

142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON. 



Special Inducements To Students. 



Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler. 

CLUB, COLLEGE £ FRATERNITY 
EMBLEMS, WATCHES, DIAM« 
ONDS, JEWELRY. X X X X 



198 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates Furnished. 



WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GEN- 
tleinen or ladies to travel for responsible, 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses. Posi- 
lion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago. 



Superior Advantages. 



Most Reasonable Rate 



3 s 



Lebanon Valley College, 

FOUNDED 1866. 

Fop hadies and Gentlemen. 

1. Thirty-second Year Opened with Double the Attendance 
last Year. 

Three Commodious Buildings ; Full Classical, Scientific 
and Musical Courses. 

2. An able Faculty ; High Standard ; Progressive Methods ; and 
Well-selected Library. 

3. Environments of the Most Helpful Character in Social, Mora 
and Religious Life. 

4. A Fine Campus of about Ten Acres for Athletic Sports, and 
well-equipped Gymnasium. 

Winter Term begins January 3d ; Spring Term, March 28, 1898, 
address, REV H y RO op, Ph. D., President, 

Rnnville, Pa. 



Webster's 
International 
Dictionary 

The One Great Standard Authority, 

So writes Hon. D. J. Brewer, 
Justice U. S. Supreme Court. 

Successor of the 
"Unabridged." 



The Standard 

of the U. S. Gov't Printing 
Office, the U. S. Supreme 
Court, all the State Supreme 
Courts, and of nearly all the 
Schoolbooks. 

Warmly 
Commended 

by College Presidents, State 
Superintendents of Schools, 
and other Educators almost 
without number. 

THE BEST FOR PRACTICAL USE. 
It is easy to find the word wanted. 
It is easy to ascertain the pronunciation. 
It is easy to trace the growth of a word. 
It is easy to learn what a word means. 

The Pennsylvania School Journal says: 

—The International Webster is a treasure house 
of universal knowledge to which all the world, in 
all its ages, has made contribution, and any one 
of us may have it at his elDow. 

|^~Specimen pages sent on application to 
G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, 
Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 



A.C. Zimmerman, 



DEAUER Ifi 





IIGII 



758 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis, 
Blank Book Manufacture 

AND JOB BOOK BINDER, 



. . . RULING, 
NUMBERING, 



WIRE . . 
STITCHING 



1125 and 1127 North Third St, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 



College 



IiEBAHOfl VAIiLEY COLLEGE, 



U *NAl PRINT, ANNVILLE, PA. 



AfiflVlULtE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS HP STATIONERY. 

22 East Main St„ ANNVILLE 



Our Shelves a* e constantly filled tulth 
fJBW, SHCOriD~HRT*D and SHHup WORN. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS. 

TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

STATIOfiE^Y, 
Wall PapetM/tfindouiShades. 



A Selected Stock of the LATEST STYLES OF WALL 
PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

We Buy, Sell, and Exchange Old 
and New Text Books. 

DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING. 

PHOTOENGRAVING, 

Penn'a, Engraving Co,, 

114420 S, 7th St., PHILADELPHIA, 

COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS. 

One door West Penri'a. House, Annville. 



ene eras. 

THE LIGHT OF THE FUTURE, 

Why not be independent and own your own 
little gas plant which will give four times more 
light than ordinary gas or electric lights at one 
half the cost 1 Applicable for use in churches, 
stores, factories, hotels, residences and country 
homes j safer than ordinary gas or kerosene lamps, 
Approved by all the Boards of Underwriters 
throughout the United States. We want a first 
class agent in every town. Write for catalogue 
and prices. 

THE ACETYLENE BBS jlUINE 

AKRON, OHIO. 



Shenk & Kinports, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Dealers in DRY GOODS, NOTIO] 
and Ladies' Dress Goods, 



Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home 
made, Ingrain, and Brussels Carpets. You 
buy cheaper from us than away from home, 
and have a large stock to select from. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Theo, Leonhardt & Son, 

LITHOGRAPHERS. 

5th and Library Sts„ PHILA, 



Diplomas and Certificates of Membership, 
Also Commercial Work our Specialty, 

If you want to Buy a Hat Fight, and a Right Hat, 
or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



GO TO 



Erb & Craumer 



Eighth and Cumb. Sts„ LEBANON, PA 



M. H. SHAUD, 

—DEALER IN— 

Gold Watches and deuielry 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYSTKR." 
AND CREAM. A^flVJLtiJE, 



a, pa- 

1 



H, S. WOLF, 

DEALER IK 

Green Groceries and Confectioneries. 

RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION 

new Commonwealth 

753 Cumberland St., 

LEBANON, PA. 4 

Makes it a special object to students in 
way of a liberal discount to buy their SHO 
of them. 

"Great Music Offer. S^irS. 

more performers on the piano or organ, togethe' i(( 
ten cents in silver or postage, and we will man r'g, 
pieces full sheet music size, consisting of i*>i>uiar * g 
waltzes, marches, etc., arranged for the pi allu 
organ. Address 

CHICAGO BOOK & NEWS CO., 
215-221 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, 



$boe 




The College Forum. 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ITS STUDENTS AND FRIENDS. 



l. XI. No. 5. AKNYTLLE, PA., MAY, 1898. Whole No. 11 



OPPORTUNITY, 



Ajudgship is vacant, the ermine waits 
The shoulders of youth, brave, honest and true, 
Some one will be standing by fame's open gate 
oiider, my boys — will it be one of you ? 

President's chair of a great railroad maze 
-pty to-day, for death claimed his due, 
directors are choosing a man for his place,, 
nder, my boys — will it be one of you. 

ulpit is waiting for some one to fill ; 
eloquent men there are only a few ; [thrill ; 
man who can fill it must have power to 
best will be chosen — will it be one of you ? 

great men about us will pass to their rest, 
ir places be filled by the boys who pursue 
search for the highest, the noblest, the best; 
onder who'll find them ?-I hope 'twill be you. 

— Ram's Horn. 

ROOTED DEEP, 

V. ISAIAH W. SNEATH, PH.D., '8l. 

r es, we planted a tree — the Class 
!88i, planted a tree. In a soutli- 
t direction, fifty feet or more from 
southeast corner of the College 
Wing, it stands in its seventeenth 
But tell it not to the Botany 
fessor, we placed a large tin box 
lass treasures first in the receptacle, 
ll ge stone next and the tree on top. 
* poor tap-root! I have been 
king of its struggles ever since. 
11 split itself and go one-half to 
north and the other half to the 



1. 

south, or did it refuse to separate and 
therefore move to one side of the stone 
and down by the side of the box, or 
did it remain a stunted growth on top 
of the stone, sending a hundred rami- 
fied roots in every direction? Ah 
yes ! that tree was fettered in its nor- 
mal growth from the beginning. It 
will not last a hundred years, I fear. 
The College will go on ; but that tree 
will die a premature death. What a 
stupid class we were ! We only 
thought of Class Day and its glory. 
We failed to take into consideration 
the future years. We did a clear in- 
justice to ourselves and especially to 
our class tree. , Some storm will con- 
quer it ere long ; because it is not 
properly rooted. Say, future janitor, 
when that occurs, kindly forgive our 
short-sightedness, take our relics, place 
them in the College museum and pre- 
serve them for our sakes. 

Kind reader, is it not equally true 
in the preparation for life? How 
many young people have made a su- 
perficial work of it? They have 
blocked their way to thoroughness. 
A box or stone has proven an obstruc- 
tion to a normal development. It may 
have been a maiden fair, or a prefer- 
ence for pleasure, or an intense inter- 
est in athletics, or an unconquered 
aversion to study, or some form of vice 



66 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



or what-not. The required curriculum 
was covered, graduation was achieved 
and that was all. The individual had 
not rooted deep. He had covered 
the ground but he had not gone 
down into the depths of his work. 
He's a superficial. He entered life 
and soon failed. He ran well for a 
time but he soon fettered out. Just 
when his life ought to have manifested 
increasing power and ought to have 
been bearing a magnificent fruitage, 
it was found succumbing amidst re- 
peated failures, and so far as its help- 
ful influence in the world is concern- 
ed, it died an untimely death. He is 
a disappointment to his parents, a 
discredit to his Alma Mater and an 
a 1 most useless appendage to human- 
ity. As a barren fig tree he is bear- 
ing his curse. 

In his Elegy, the poet Gray has 
written : 

Full many a gem of purest ray serene 
The dark unfathomed cares of ocean bear, 
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. 

There are indeed many who "lacked 
opportunity" and so have remained in 
oblivion. But these are they who 
passed into oblivion because they 
failed to use their opportunity. They 
would not master their work. They 
entered not into the depths. Applica- 
tion to study was missing. They 
knew, but they did not know it well. 
The successful student goes deep. He 
toils incessantly. Edison has defined 
success as two per cent genius and 
ninety-eight per cent hard work. "We 
sink to rise" says Emerson. Let your 
preparatory work of life be done well 
and your life work will be well done. 
The deeper your tap-root, the higher 



your tree. We would not offer a 
couraging word to those who h 
found their way blocked by unfo 
nate struggles. 

M. Louis Figuier tells of the m- 
velous ways in which the roots 
trees have overcome obstacles. So 
of us can sympathize with these nr 
Indeed this is one hope we have with 
reference to that class tree. That it 
successfully overcame, ran its tap-root 
through the box and my copy of 
Homer and down into the depths. All 
hail to the heroes, who have overcome. 
But, my fellow-student, whatever your 
circumstances, redeem your time, u 
your opportunity, put all hindranc 
aside, surmount all obstacles a" 
above all, in no manner block your 
course to the most thorough and co " 
plete mental development. 

And may we add, that what we have 
said with reference to mental prepara- 
tion is equally applicable to the moral 
and the spiritual. A character that 
will abide and be fruitful must be 
firmly rooted and grounded in Christ 
and the principles of righteousness. 
There must be "deepness of earth" a? 
the Master intimated in the parable. 
May God direct our lives and "cause 
them to take deep root" so that being 
"rooted and built up in him," our leaf 
also shall not wither and whatsoever 
we do shall prosper. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Find your niche, and fill it. ^ 
be ever so little, if it is only to b< 
hewer of wood or drawer of water, 
something in this great battle for ( 
and truth. — Spurgcon. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



67 



THE FUEL OF THE SUN. 



M. M. WEBER. 

e most momentous question upon 
the mind of our astronomers and one 
of equal importance to all is : Is the 
heat of the sun a constant quantity ? 
For unwieldiness this may maintain 
first position on the list of hard prob- 
ems; but for timeliness it suggests 
another, in our mind but little less im- 
portant and which really precedes the 
above since upon it depends the whole 
atter of constancy of quantity : 
hence has our sun his fuel ? One 
s no more soluble than the other but 
solve the first mentioned without 
e correct solution of the latter would 
probably prove too long a process for 
even the most sanguine and patient. 

Observations through a sufficient 
period of time would certainly estab- 
lish the first, but the latter holds the 
charm for the average student of a 
ipeculative turn of mind who must 
settle questions as they go and only 
expect grades on satisfactory work. 

Apparently, analogy and reason are 
the means at hand to solve the fuel 
question. To all who have studied 
•he Nebular Hypothesis — and give it 
credence— it is plain that the sun must 
at one time have been much larger 
than at present. To know whether 
)r not he was proportionately hotter 
mi ght prove very helpful to the one 
Pondering the question of quantity; 
not to know this, however, does not in 
J he least discourage the solver of the 
tuel problem. 

If the supply of fuel is constant the 
{ ea t will be constant. If the supply 
J 11 the heat must also fai 
^n. tli 



e 

P 

1: 

c 

s 

s 
e 

t 

1 
t 



ie evidence 



u. Give us, 
as to the nature 



and availableness of the"combustible 
material consumed by this great solar 
furnace, and we may conclude there- 
from, whether its heat is constant in 
quantity or whether it wanes as the 
years pass and the sun grows older. 

Supposing the fuel to consist of cer- 
tain ingredients of the sun himself, or 
his fires burn a certain combination of 
his latent elements only, then, his 
heat must decrease in proportion as 
those ingredients are spent, or those 
combinations dissolved, and total ex- 
tinction would be a question of a com- 
paratively short space of time. Even 
if compressed anthracite coal would 
constitute the make up of old sol his 
last ashes could be sifted within about 
5,000 years. In fact, whatever the 
material might be that serves to feed 
the awful heater, so long as the sun 
must furnish from his contained store, 
it must grow less and consequently 
the energy of heat decrease in propor- 
tion to the decrease in the available- 
ness of such elements. In this case 
the sun himself would shrink; the 
force of his fire lessen ; and the amount 
of heat radiated diminish as his sur- 
face is reduced. 

Suppose again, that the fuel is fur- 
nished to the sun from the space about 
him, then that supply is limited or 
regulated else the fire would grow hot- 
ter and hotter, while the demand for 
more fuel would increase as the body 
and fury of this terrible furnace grows 
until the entire universe be involved 
in a universal conflagration. Now 
this supposition would be entirely 
without reason but not any more so 
than the first ; for while this would give 
us a hotter sun who would eventually 



68 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



— dragon like — devour us the first 
would give us a miserable cinder, leav- 
ing us in the dark and cold before our 
history could be properly appreciated 
by our progeny. The first supposition 
is impossible ; the second preposterous. 
Are not wiser people than we satisfied 
that the sun gives light and heat now 
as it always did, simply because it was 
made for that purpose and can't help 
but radiate heat and light because it 
is made of fire ? Do not some of us 
still entertain the idea that the sun's 
heat is furnished to his dependents 
from an open fire kindled at some re- 
mote time and fed much as a bonfire 
on the campus is replenished — by pil- 
ing on more material ? 

By comparing facts we now hold, 
we have come in our experience, to 
where we find ourselves believing that 
the great luminary of our solar system 
has been growing smaller year by year 
from remote ages, and we are more 
ready to concede his eventual extinc- 
tion than to grant him eternal dura- 
tion as a light and heat giver. Since 
he grows smaller, then, may we not 
with reason suppose that this very 
process of condensation is one of the 
heat producing agencies ? His august 
majesty is inconceivably larger than 
anything we can comprehend that the 
frictional heat generated by the mi- 
nutest motion against each other, 
brought on by contraction, of so vast 
a conglomeration of particles would 
possibly compensate all loss by radia- 
tion even though no other source of 
fueling existed. It has been computed 
that if the sun shrink but a few hun- 
dred feet in a year the frictional heat 
supplied thus would maintain the 



quantity of imparted heat as at pr 
for many millions of years hence 
Several hundred feet per annum would 
mean about 4 miles per centu 
Whether the sun has shrunk at 
greater or lesser rate than this can n 
be known for in our knowledge 
perceptible change in size has 
curred. 

Then again, is it necessary that co 
densation supply all the heat fore 
If the law of gravitation obtain eve: 
where can it be otherwise than th 
an incalculable amount of matter 
continually showered upon the surfa 
of the sun and thus doing away with 
the necessity of perceptible contrac- 
tions, at least ? Imagine the undreamt 
millions of bodies of various propor- 
tions roving in space through which 
our great sun circles, many of which 
fall within his reach and are surely 
and destructively drawn to him ; strike 
his surface ; changing their motion 
into heat and thus compensate, in 
large measure, the loss both by co 
traction and radiation. Promine 
astronomers have calculated that on 
own planet even, if it were to strike 
the sun, would generate enough heat 
to replace loss by radiation for over 
ten years, and when we consider what tl 
an insignificant bit our globe is com- || 
pared with the genera of space we j r 
may readily grasp the admirable st 
chances existing for the sun to find re- 
inforcements to apparently maintain tl 
his equilibrium in size and potency f° r 
many cycles of time yet unborn. 

If, then, we suppose that in connec- 
tion with the condensation always g ' 
ing on, old Sol, during his extended 
reign as a sun, has been pelted " 



:■ 

UI n , 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



69 



s, can we not reasonably con- 
clude, that from the friction within 
j,js own members ; plus the impact of 
myriads of worlds splintering all over 
jjjs sides we are furnished this marvel- 
ous heat and light, year after year, 
century after century, adown the ages ? 

x 

RELIGIOUS, 

he Methodist Episcopal Church 
87 institutions, 917 professors, 
68 students, $9,356,652 endow- 
ment ; the Baptist Church has 50 in- 
stitutions, 704 professors, 6,800 stu- 
dents, 113,367,185 endowment; the 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches 
62 institutions, 574 professors, 5,204 
students, $6,018,054 endowment; the 
Catholic Church has 59 institutions, 
580 professors, 4,968 students, $750,- 
000 endowment ; the Congregational 
Church has 26 institutions, 465 pro- 
fessors, 4,103 students, $8,610,452 en- 
dowment ; Denominations reporting 
less thsn 20. institutions, 57 institu- 
tions, 550 professors, 5,028 students, 
$5 795) 1 44 endowment. Total de- 
nominational institutions 364, 3,969 
professors, 36,996 students, $44,624,- 
°46 endowment ; no; classified, 9 in- 
stitutions ; non-sectarian, 1 1 1 institu- 
tes, 2,988 professors, 30,958 students, 
$64,693,387 endowment. Total, 484 
ln stitutions, 6,957 professors, 67,953 
st "dents, $109,317,433 endowment. 

Wellington is quoted as having said 
4at Waterloo was won at Eton. The 
^ e at moral victories which we hope 
to s ee won in our land are to be won, 
a -> we believe, by the youths now in 
institutions of learning. They 
be undoubtedly for the most part 
le Naders in literature — the men of 



influence in the halls of science, in the 
cabinets of statesmen and in the 
realms of theology, law and medicine. 
The conversion of the 4,400 college 
youths, at present not professors of 
religion, and the full consecration of 
their talents to the service of Christ, 
would mean more for this country than 
any other event that we can think of 
as possible. Ought not the prayers of 
the people of God to go up most earn- 
estly for such a blessing? 

Another consideration must weio-h 
most solemnly on the hearts of Chris- 
tians. It is a matter of long observa- 
tion that the relation of young people 
to religion as it stands at the conclu- 
sion of the college course is commonly 
the relation which they will sustain 
to it to the end of life. Now is the 
time to be earnest in prayer and effort 
before graduation day ushers our youth 
into the arena of public life. 

Finally it is from college halls that 
the ministry of the future is to be 
most satisfactorily recruited. The 
church may well be both ashamed and 
afraid to send forth into the work of 
ministry in an age like ours men who 
have not had the best opportunities of 
education which present methods af- 
ford. Only when the church sinks 
into the sloth of criminal inaction can 
she cease to be deeply interested in 
the problem of recruiting for the work 
of evangelizing the world. Let her 
take this opportunity for united and 
earnest prayer for the dedication to 
the ministry of the choicest of our 
college-bred men. — The Presbyterian. 

X 

Light burdens, long borne, grow 
heavy. 



7° 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



AMONG THE SOCIETIES. 



PHILOKOSMIAN. 



"Esse Quam Videri." 
Resolutions for debate in literary 
societies embracing the usages of in- 
ternational law are of special interest 
at this juncture. There are compara- 
tively few men in public life who 
have an intelligent grasp of the rights 
of belligerents, or even of neutral 
powers in time of war. As the scope 
of diplomacy enlarges as is the ten- 
dency now, and war becomes less 
frequent, we think that debates and 
referred questions should take a course 
in this direction at frequent intervals. 
If these things were better understood 
by editors and critics in general, there 
would be less fault finding and hasty 
criticisms of our public men, and par- 
ticularly of our federal administration. 
The literary society has here in our 
humble opinion a wide field of useful- 
ness before it. 

Arrangements are being made to 
hold a joint session with the Clionian 
Literary Society in the near future. 
These meetings are always appreciated 
by our boys. 

On Friday evening, April 2 2d, Mr. 

A. S. Ulrich, '97, and Mr. G. A. Ul- 
rich '97, former members, paid us a 
visit. They were pleased with the 
success we have been achieving, and 
their words were greatly appreciated. 
A number of other visitors were pres- 
ent and made encouraging remarks. 

The Philo Society continues to 
prosper. Nine new members, Messrs. 
YY. O. Jones, Jacob R. Geyer, H. N. 

B. Lane, Herman G. Ruhl, Rollin R. 



Sites, W. O. Roop, Ralph L. Engl e 
J. Raymond Engle and Oscar Stauffer 
having been added to the roll during 
the past month. 

Ralph D. Reider. 
KALOZETEAN, 



Palma Non Sine Pulvere. 
The twenty-first anniversary of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society was held 
in the college chapel on the evening 
of April 8 at which time the following 
program was rendered : 

Overture — Cupid's Realm, Armstrong. 
Invocation, Bishop Kephart. 

President's Address, H. E. Miller, 

Waltz — Reign of Eove, Eno, 
Oration — An Impending danger, A. K. Wiei 
Galop— Top Notch, Leavith. 
Oration— The Man Wanted, M. M. Weber. 
Overture— Grenadier, Armstrong. 
Essay— The Field Whitens, A. E. Schroyer. 
Waltz— Love and Beauty, Armstrong. 
Honorary Oration — The Times, 

Rev. E. O. Burtner, B.S., B.D. 
March— Clover, Jenningl 

The chapel was crowded with an 
expectant audience, who showed by 
their strict attention to the speakers 
and by the hearty applause which fol- 
lowed each performance, that the pn 
gram was thoroughly appreciated, 
both for the entertainment it gave and 
for the instruction it afforded. 

The most pleasing feature of 1 
exercises of the evening was the mus 
rendered by the Lebanon Banjo Clu 
They are exceptionally fine playe 15 
and rendered first class music. Th is 
was their first appearance at L. V. Q 
and won for them merited appla use 
of the audience, and, we think we are 
right when we say, "It has won 
them the future patronage of the 
lege." 



0. 
l 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



7 1 



During the past few weeks of t"ie 
ing term our Society has been vis- 
by some of our honorable seniors 
well as some of the new students, 
long whom are the following : 
lessrs. Deibler, Baer, Balsbaugh, 
lhl, Garland, Hershey, Smeltzer and 
loads. Mr. Smeltzer has since join- 
K. h- S. and we heartily welcome 
as one of the "boys," perhaps 
ore so because of his taking the 
nidation so gracefully. Our doors 
ever open to visitors and any 
2rs who may wish to join with us 
a grand and noble work. 

W. J. Sanders. 

ALUMNI ET ALUMNAE, 



Sometime ago we addressed a num- 
ber of letters to the members of the 
Alumni, but thus far only one Rev. 
Isaiah Sneath, Ph.D., '81, has re- 
sponded. We hope the article by Dr. 
Sneath will be an incentive to those 
who have promised, but thus far failed 
to furnish an article for the Forum. 

Rev. C. A. Burtner, Ph.D., '78, pas- 
tor of Riley Street United Brethren 
Church, Harrisburg, Pa., visited us 
faring the month. 

Rev. E. O. Bnrtner, '89, pastor of 
4e United Brethren Church, Gordon- 
n Ue, Pa-, delivered the Honorary Ora- 
hon at Kalozetean Anniversary. His 
theme was, "The Times— The Man." 

Geo. A. E. Kindt, '94, recently 
s P?nt a few days with us. 

Norman C. Schlichter, '97, has been 
c hosen to write the Alurnnal poem to 
I ^ delivered at the meeting of the 
1 Al unmi Association. 



Miss Estella Stehman, '96, attended 
a missionary meeting at Hummels- 
town, April 12 and 13, and on her 
way home spent a short time here 
visiting friends. 

Harry W. Mayer, '95, attended the 
anniversary of the Kalozetean Liter- 
ary Society. 

Samuel H. Stein, '92, student in 
the Theological Seminary, Lancaster, 
Pa., spent Easter at home with his 
parents. 

Miss Ella N. Saylor, '92, was 
married on the 14th inst. to Mr A. B. 
Sheffey. The Forum extends con- 
gratulations. 

Rev. H. T. Denlinger, '87, pastor of 
the United Brethren Church, Pen- 
brook, Pa., spent some days in town 
during the past month. 

We are always pleased to hear of 
any Alumnus who succeeds in fight- 
ing life's battles successfully. This 
is especially true of H. B. Roop, M.D., 
'92. We are pleased to hear of the 
success which attends his labors in the 
healing art at Columbia, Pa. 

The publishers of the Junior Annual 
wish to state to those of the Alumni 
who have responded to a request to 
send a short biographical sketch, that 
because a large percentage have not 
responded, it has been thought wise 
to publish nothing more than the di- 
rectory of the Alumni. Those wish- 
ing copies of the Annual should send 
in their orders at once to the business 
manager, W. G. Clippinger. 

Are you a subscriber or free-lunch- 
ing on another's Forum ? 



72 



IB COLLEGE FORUM. 



The Coll 



Drum, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly 
throughout the college^ year by the Philokosmian 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 

O. P. DeWitt, '9\ Editor-in-Chief. 
Jay W. Yoe, '98. G. E. Snoke, '00. 

C. V. CUPPINGER, '99. R. R- BUTTERWICK, '01. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT, 

W. G. Cuppingkr, '99, Business Manager. 

S. F. Daugherty, '00. Assistant Business Manager. 



Terms : Twentyfive cents a year, five cents a copy, 
THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to 
all subscribers until an order is received for its dis' 
continuance, and until all arrearages have been paid, 



Address all communications, articles for publication, 
exchanges, etc., to W. G. Clippinger, Box 86, Ann- 
ville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Ofnce at Annville, Pa., as second- 
class mail matter. 



EDITORIALS, 



GENTLE spring is gradually coax- 
ing (?) the student from his hibernal 
haunts, and out-door exercises are now 
in full blast. Base ball, cycling and 
tennis seem to be the leading attrac- 
tions. Some good and available ma- 
terial has been developed in all lines 
of athletic sports. Even the gymna- 
sium is not entirely forsaken these 
balmy days. 



* * 
* 



While speaking of athletics in 
general it may be well to note with 
what tenacity the foot ball holds the 
student body. One evening recently, 
the base ball captain was congratulat- 
ing himself on what a fine game his 
team was putting up against the 
scrubs. Every man held his place 



an 1 great interest was manifested bv 
the throng of students and citizer 
present. A few, however, thought 
the game was slow. These few were 
foot ball players. They sought the 
manager of their favorite athletic 
sport and requested him to pert 
them to take the pigskin on the car 
pus for a few kicks. The manage 
feared the effect on the base ball game, 
but reluctantly consented. As soon 
as the ball was kicked into the air a 
wild whoop went up from every quar- 
ter of the campus and every man 
from his post to get in the scritnmas 
for the pigskin. Base ball and bat! 
were thrown down and captain and 
players alike rushed headlong to get 
into the line up for a game of foot 
ball. Base ball was dead for the da 
and in order to have it resurrected thi 
foot ball had to be put under lock and 
key. Why is it that the foot ball ha 
such a hold on the modern collec 
student ? 

* * 
* 

War has come. The grim visa| 
monster, whose well defined outline 
have for years been growing more dis 
tiuct, can now be seen in all its horr 
reality. The United States has re 
ceived its final insult from Spain, ct 
minating in the dismissal of Ministe 
Woodford from the Spanish capit 
before he could present the ultimata! 
and ask for his passports. This 
considered a gross breach of interr 
tional etiquette and law, and unde 
the circumstances warrants the imm 
diate activity which Yankee ingenuit 
has instilled into the American navy. 

Commodore Sampson is playi fl S 
with cannon balls near Morro Castle 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



73 



nd halting every craft that ventures 

run the blockade of Havana. Com- 
modore Schley has the ocean grey- 
hounds out on the high seas trying to 
find the Spanish fleet. He is anxious 
to meet the Dons and have a settle- 
ment in regard to the Maine affair. 
And when that settlement is made the 
waves will be crimsoned, if not with 
blood, then with the reflection of those 

lorious stars and stripes, the prettiest 
ag of any nation of the earth, that 
ill wave from the Spanish mastheads 
after the surrender. 

Our national navy is to-day invinci- 
ble, and nothing but God's wrath or 
internal treachery can cause its defeat. 

1 is thoroughly aroused by the de- 
struction of the Maine, and revenge 
as well as duty and national honor 
will stimulate it. When the guns of 
the opposing nations meet and belch 
forth those tongues of living fire, then 
it is that the civilized world will find 

hat advancements have been made 
n the mode of modern warfare ; Chris- 
endom will be astonished at the de- 
ices of war and the advancement in 
electrical appliances for the annihila- 
tion an enemy's fleet. 
We are not waging an aggressive 
ar. We are but imbued with the 
irit of the common rights of human- 
ty- The God of battles is with us 
and right and justice will triumph. 
S° let us march with an unwavering 
front and unfaltering step, for the cry 
has been given, "Remember the boys 
the Maine." The command has 
e n given, "On to Havana." Prompt 
ct ion and obedience will make the 
ar brief, decisive, and eternally vic- 
orious. 



ICH BIN DEIN. 

[The Journal of Education commends this in- 
genius poem, written in five languages — Eng- 
lish, French, German, Greek and Latin — as one 
of the best specimens of macaronic verse in ex- 
istence and worthy of preservation by all col- 
lectors.] 

In tempus old a hero lived, 

Qui loved puelias peux ; 
He no pouvoit has quite to say 

Which one amabat mieux. 

Dit-il lui-meme un beau matin, 

" Non possum both avoir, 
Sed si address Amanda Ann, 

Then Kate and I have war. 

" Amanda habut argent coin, 

Sed Kate has aureas curls ; 
Et both sunt very agathee, 

Et quite formosse girls. 

Enfin the youthful anthropos, 

Philoun the duo maids, 
Resolved proponere ad Kate, 

Devant cet evening's shades. 

Trocedens then to Kate's domo, 

II trouve Amanda there, 
Kai quite forgot his late resolves. 

Both sunt so goodly fair. 

Sed smiling on the new tapis, 

Between puelias twain, 
Coepit to tell his love a Kate 

Dans un poetique strain. 

Mais, glancing ever et anon 

At fair Amanda's eyes, 
Illae non possunt dicere 

Pro which he meant his sighs. 

Each virgo heard the demi-vow, 
With cheeks as rouge as wine, 

And off 'ring each a milk-white hand 
Both whispered, " Ich bin dein." 

"My hor(a)se ! My Hor(a)se ! 
My kingdom for a Hor(a)se." 
He had received seventy for a term 
grade. 

Caesar was not dead. He simply took 
a nap and forgot to report at class. 



74 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



WITH THE EXCHANGES. 

We are glad to welcome "The Red 
and Blue" to our table again after a 
too long absence. The Mask and 
Wig number comes to us rife with 
good things. We heartily second the 
effort of the editor in trying to coun- 
teract the sensational newspaper ex- 
aggerations of college scrimmages. 
Our newspapers are doing our college 
students a great injury by publishing 
such accounts. We venture the fol- 
lowing clipping : 

"No one but a student can under- 
stand students' ways and ideas. No 
one but a student can understand how 
a Sophomore and a Freshman can tear 
off each other's clothes for fifteen min- 
utes and then walk peaceably off to- 
gether, wrapped in one blanket. No 
one but a student can understand that 
this is but friendly rivalry, merely a 
display of class spirit." 

It is with relief that we turn from 
the stern severe style of most of our 
exchanges (edited by men) to those 
that come to us from colleges for the 
fair sex exclusively. Among these is 
the "Lesiban Herald." The April 
number contains a very timely article 
on "The Slang Plague" from which 
we quote : 

"Such expressions as 'peach,' 'nit,' 
and 'any old thing,' are freely sown in 
this sort of talk and many others 
equally abominable which are not 
mentioned. It seems to me this is 
really 'broken English' — much worse 
than the linguistic efforts of the hand- 
organ man. He at least is doing his 
best, while our girls, living in refined 
homes and being educated in good 



schools, deliberately mangle their na- 
tive tongue, so that for those not 
familiar with the latter day 'slanguage' 
it would require a glossary to follow 
their meaning. When the girls say 
'I don't think,' we are inclined to be- 
lieve that they are inadvertently tell- 
ing us a sober truth." 

Among the best semi-monthly ex- 
changes which we receive is the 
"Ursinus College Bulletin." It is 
always filled with excellent reading 
matter but we thin* it might be im- 
proved by the addition of an exchange 
column. 

From Poland's fair, unhappy land, 

There conies the dreadful news, 
That makes the hearer's heart to stand ; 

The cheek its color lose. 

'Tis not of Russian cruelty — 

Of patriots slaughtered there ; 
But 'tis — alas ! that it should be — 

Paderewski 's cut his hair. 

MUSICAL. 



A stringed quartette has been or- 
ganized consisting of C. V. Clippinger, 
violin ; W. O. Roop, mandolin ; Mr. 
Spessard, guitar ; L. E. Cross, guitar. 

The College quartette attended the 
Ministerial Institute in Lebanon on 
April 14th and rendered some choice 
selections. 

The College is yet sadly in need of 
a good glee club. It is not that ma- 
terial is wanting, but only the need of 
some one to take the initiatory step 
and act as conductor. 

a; 

Mr. R: "This is the happiest mo- 
ment of my life." 



RELIGIOUS WORK IN THE COLLEGE. 



1 

1 RELIG 

The moral and religious atmosphere 
j of the College is keeping apace with 
the increase in the number of students 
and growth of college spirit. 

The Y. M. C. A. meetings have 
never been better attended, and sel- 
dom has a greater interest been shown 
in its workings. The recitation rooms 
are too small to accommodate the en- 
larged attendance at the mid-week 
prayer meetings, consequently they 
are held in the chapel. 

In these, as well as the other ser- 
vices, active spiritual interest is shown 
by the students and prof issors. The 
seasons of special Bible study and con- 
ecration which attended Rev. C. E. 
Hurlburt's lectures were not without 
tiost fruitful results. Following his 
first week's work in the College was a 
aost refreshing revival season, in 
vhich a number of the young men 
professed conversion. Though months 
have passed since then, these far- 
reaching influences are being felt 
iroughout the entire community, and 
10 one can estimate the spiritual 
vorth of this man of God. 

It can be said without fear of con- 
radiction, that along with the de- 
hghtful social amusements and lively 
athletic spirit, Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege offers a home to young men and 
women which is remarkably free from 
^temperate and vicious habits and 
whose atmosphere is sweetend by the 
Allowed influence of religious zeal. 

X 

Artie (as Pres. raps on the door, — 
^ indeed Pres. I can't get the door 
°pen. The boys have fastened me in. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



75 



PERSONALS. 



Prof. Spangler preached at Ephrata 
the 24th. 

Prof. Daugherty and wife spent the 
24th, at his old charge at Harrisburg. 

S. F. Daugherty, 'oo, was visiting 
his parents in Dallastown over Sunday, 
April 3d. 

Miss Hattie Shelley, '99, spent Sun- 
day, April 10th, in Philadelphia, vis- 
iting friends. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, preached in 
the U. B. Church in Myerstown, Sun- 
day, April 24th. 

Luring the past month Dr Roop 
has conducted communion services at 
Mech anicsburg and Sheppardstown, 
and College Day exercises at Shire- 
manstown, Columbia, Steelton and 
Mountville. 

Those of the students who spent 
Easter Sunday at their homes were 
Miss Grabill, '99, David Oyer, Miss 
Putt, Miss Louise Miller, '98, and 
Frank Douglass. 

Prof. Spangler's rhetorical class en- 
tertained the friends of the College on 
the evening of the 23d. A good class 
well prepared and rendering good pro- 
ductions graced the stage. 

Work is progressing on the Junior 
Annual. Photographs of the classes, 
athletic team, literary societies, and 
other organizations, are being taken 
preparatory to making half-tones for 
the book. Artists have been prepar- 
ing comic sketches of varied descrip- 
tions to add life and interest to the 
Annual. It will be published about 
June 1 st. 



76 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Misses Langdon and Short, of Sugar 
Grove, Pa., were visiting Mrs. Dr. 
Roop for a few weeks during the 
month. 

Quite a representation from the 
College attended the Ministerial Insti- 
tute held in the Memorial U. B. Church 
on Thursday evening. Pres. Roop 
delivered an address on the need of 
thorough heart and mind training. 
Music was furnished by the College 
quartette and Mrs. Roop. 

The entertainment given on Satur- 
day evening, April 16th, for the bene- 
fit of the Athletic Association was a 
decided success, but was only fairly 
attended. Notwithstanding the enter- 
tainment and supper netted a neat 
sum, and the association wishes to 
thank the students and town people 
for their patronage. It was deserving 
a far better patronage. It would be 
useless to mention any particular fea- 
ture of the widely varied program. 

More will be seen of the physical 
culture class in the near future. The 
elocutionary and physical culture de- 
partments will give a special enter- 
tainment. 

ITEMS OF INTEREST, 

The British Isles comprise no fewer 
than one thousand separate islands and 
inlets, without counting mere jutting 
rocks or isolated pinnacles. 

In the British Museum are bricks 
taken from the buildings in Nineveh 
and Babylon which show no signs of 
decay, although the ancients did not 



bake or burn them, but dried them in 
the sun. 

No parental care ever fall to the lot 
of any member of the insect tribe. I n 
general, the eggs of an insect are des- 
tined to be hatched long after the par- 
ents are dead, so that most insects are 
born orphans. 

In London — unlike other cities, 
especially New York and Vienna — no 
house is permitted to exceed in height 
the width of the street in front, and 
the number of inhabitants in any lo- 
cality is limited by law. 

The Yellow river is styled the "Sor- 
row of China." During the last cen- 
tury it has changed its course twenty- 
two times, and now flows through a 
mouth 300 miles distant from that of 
100 years ago. It is estimated that 
the floods of the present century have 
cost China 11,000,000 of lives. 

Most people take isinglass to be a 
mineral production, but such is no' 
the case. Isinglass is prepared from 
the air bladders of giant sturgeons, a 
species of fish which inhabit the Cas- 
pian Sea and its tributary rivers. 
These fish average twenty-five feet lfl 
length, and it is said to take the blad- 
ders of seventeen good-sized ones to 
make three pounds of the glass. 

Mr. B. (in Geometry) : Things that 
are equal to each other are equal to 
themselves. 

Miss B. (in Endences), Now at Beth- 
any Lazarus the sister of Martha ai 
Mary lived. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



77 



IF YOU WOULD BE POPULAR 

Don't find fault. 
Don't over or under dress. 
Don't believe all the evil you hear. 
Don't jeer at anybody's religious 
belief. 

Don't be rude to your inferiors to 
social position. 

Don't repeat gossip, even if it does 
interest a crowd. 

Don't go untidy on the plea that 
everybody knows you. 

Don't underrate anything because 
you do not possess it. 

Don't contradict people, even if you 
are sure you are right. 

Don't believe anybody else in the 
world is happier than you are. 

Don't conclude that you have never 
had any opportunity in your life. 

Don't be inquisitive about the af- 
airs of even your most intimate 
friends. 

Don't express a positive opinion 
unless you perfectly understand what 
you are talking about. 

io p. m.— College boys in dishabille. 
President g me, all was still. 

A handful of good life is better than 
a bushel of learning. 

* * 

A foot of newly-fallen snow changes 
ln to an inch of water when melted. 

Kvery good book we read becomes 
lens through which we see ourselves. 

'To err is human." This is sound 
°ctrine, nor is it hard to live up to, 



There are few circumstances which 
might not have been worse, 

* * 

You cannot stop your neighbor's 
tongue, but you can stop your own 
ears. 

Of all the states, Ohio has the lanr- 
est number of college students — 24,000 
— of which one-third are women. 

* 

They who see more evil in the 
world than good, see but the reflection 
of their own hearts. 

* ■ 

Mr. R. (on fire escape) — Oh boys 
pull me up Pres. is coming. 
Pres. — Just come down Mr. R. 

The young man who is anxious to 
lay the world at the feet of the girl 
he adpres, three months after he mar- 
ries her isn't willing even to lay the 
carpet. 

* 

Krupp, the great gun maker, has 
recently completed some paper cannon 
for the German army. Their caliber 
is two inches, and thev are so lio-ht 
that a single soldier can carry one of 
them. At the same time the resist- 
ance is greater than that of a field 
piece of steel the same size. It is not 
expected that these paper guns will 
replace those of metal. They are 
merely intended for use in portions of 
the field where the taking of metal 
guns is impracticable. 

WASTED-TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE (f EN- 
tleiaeu or Indies to travel tor responsible 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses Posi' 
Hon steady. Keference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope. Tlie Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago 



i 



78 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



g, B. MARSHALL, M.D. 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

HARRY ZIMMERMAN, D.D,S„ 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

72 West Main Street, ANNVILLE. PA, 



Rensselaer % 



Polytechnic^ 



JACOB SARGENT, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

1 8 and 20 West riain St., ANNVILLE. 

WILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, ANNVILLE, PA. 

p, W. FROST, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



KREIDER & CO,, 



H. H. KREIDER. 
JNO. E. HERR. 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 



' Institute, 
e % Troy, N.Y. 

1/ ral examine! ions provided for. Send for a Catalogue 

Bicycles 

AND SUNDRIES. 

First-class, up-to-date Bicycles at $35.1 
and up. A full line of supplies for the wheel, 
Light running wheels for rent. 

Repairing of all kinds promptly attended to. 

E. P. Anthony, 

ANNVILLE, P. 

I860. 

J, HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENi, 

S. W. Corner 8th and Willow, LEBANON. 



Hard L Soft Coal 1 Grain, Seeds, Salt L Feed, **-all companies first-class. 

Office: Railroad St., near Depot. AMMVTT TP PA 
Telephone Connection. /\inin v r /\. 



Qnowflake printing house, 

^ A. C. M. HIESTER, Prop. 

FINE JOB PRINTING 

North White Oak Street, ANNVILLE, PA 

J, R, McCAULEY, 

DAILY MEAT MARKET, 

GOOD MEAT— LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, PA, 



I Translations \ 

I Lateral Interlinear, 

|j 67 Volumes. 

I Dictionaries 

German, French, 
I Italian, Spanish, 

I Liatin and Greek. 



JOSEPH MILLER, 
FURNITURE & UNDERTAKING, 

West Main St, ANNVILLE, PA. 



I Arthur Hinds & Co , 

t 4 Cooper Institute. NEW YORK 



/I'll A TPT>P Desiring positions in anv State in the Union should write to us. We eliavt 1 f r0 „e 

H AC jHh ITS mission or salary for our services. Life membership and duplicate registration' 
A J-M XV-U. XX^IVU fee Graduate stUQ e U ts in great demand. 100 good teachers wanted lmmeow ^ 
who can till emergency vacancies in Penn'a. on short notice. Address, h. H. HOPKINS & CO-, Hancock, 5D)|) 
Represented in New York, Chicago, Sau Franciseo, Boston, Denver, New Orleans, Philadelphia ana Atianw- - 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



inv 

Vld- 
jlllO 



79 



HOME EXERCISERS, 50 cents Up. 



Fine, firm, beautiful muscles ; the vigor of superb manhood ; the grace, suppleness] and 
symmetry of perfect womanhood obtained through physical culture with the 

McFADDEN HEALTH EXERCISERS 

PATENTED 1897. 

when used as instructed in large 128 page instruction book, containing 53 full page half tones 
(5 by 8) illustrating development and exercises. Recommended by thousands of physicians and 
physical culture experts throughout America and Europe. Gives every conceivable motion. 
Each Exerciser fitted with changeable rubbers, adjustable strength from weakest child to 
strongest man. Noiseless. Better grades guaranteed two years. " Weight two pounds. Complete 
gymnasium— can be used for Chest Weights, Rowing Machines, Intercostal Apparatuses, 
and Floor Pulley Machines. 



FRONT VIEW RIGHT ARM 
UNDEVELOPED 



BACK VIEW PROF. McFADDEN'S 
RIGHT ARM 




• •• 



Which arm does 
Yours Resemble ? 



••• 



WHY HAVE AN ARM 
LIKE THIS? 




WHEN IT CAN JUST AS WELL BE 
FULLY DEVELOPED LIKE THIS 



One High-Grade Exerciser will do for the Family— the pull can be adjusted in a moment to 

suit the strength of anyone 




i Ing str °nff man using our high- 
K^ exereiser - ful1 strength, three 
f n m Y?° t0 50 Ibs - Exerciser hung 
"°m ordinary door hinges. 



Showing lady using same exerciser 
adjusted to medium strength, two 
strands, 15 to 30 lbs. 



Showing child using same exerciser 
adjusted to light strength, inverted 
and nulling from floor, one strand 
S to 5 lbs. 



Home Exercisers from 50 cents Upwards. 

, McFADDEN TRAINING OUTFIT 

st °" lpl f e - with 128 Page Instruction Book, ''McFadden's Phvsicial Training," $ 2 to $5. Send 
tain 1 if- 8 f mple pagCS ° f large book and P rofnsel ) T illustrated and descriptive pamphlet, con- 
for I R ^ 1 enclorsem ents from prominent people. Liberai terms to agents everywhere. Write 
or our offer, "How to Get an Exerciser Free." Address, 

BUSINESS MANAGER OF COLLEGE FORUM. 



1 



8o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



fa 



Eastman Business College 



The System of Teaching 



Has in its half a century of work 
developed the capacity of thousands 
into well-trained men, capable to fill 
every department of a business career. 
Known everywhere for the thorough- 
ness of the preparation given in the 
least time at the smallest expense. 



Is based on actual daily experience 
in every branch of business, includ- 
ing Merchandising, Bookkeeping, 
Banking, Commercial Law, Penman- 
ship, Correspondence. Arithmetic, 
Telegraphy, Stenography, Type-writ- 
ing, etc., etc. 



I 




The Journal or the Annual Catalogue will inter- 
est you. Write for it. Address 

CLEMENT C. GAINES, President. 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



1 




Men Trained 



To be all -around business men : — or 
thev may take up a special branch of 
business ami be THOROUGH in that. 

No better illustration of the value of 
a business education can be offered 
than the success of those who have 
graduated from Eastman College. 

By the old way, training for business 
was acquired through years of ap- 
prenticeship, but the successful man 
of today is the one who enters the 
field prepared for the work he is to do 
by the new and shorter methods of 
Eastman College, the model business 
school. j|j 

H 

•T•^'•T•T•'••^•'^'•v'■:^^•^•T•T• :^ '•^• : '''^ 



1 A Thorough Business Man 

n 

Is the description of the man who 
||t becomes successful, is known and bas 
s| the confidence of the community. 

» BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with com- 
j|! petent assistants. Situations secured 
without charge, for all graduates of 
the Business and Short-hand Courses, 
an invaluable feature to many young 
people. Open all the year. Time 
short. Terms reasonable. Address 
as above. 



w 

su: 
pa 



THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
; A. MAULFAIR, Gen. Agt. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ALL THE LATEST AND BEST POLICIES ISSUED. 

TEACHERS. 

nion Teachers' Agencies of America. 

REV. L. D. BASS, D. D., MANAGER. 

ttsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, 
La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C, 
San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, 111., St. 
Louis, Mo., and Denver, Colo. 

There are thousands of positions to be filled. 
We had over 8,000 vacancies last season. Un 
rpassed facilities for placing teachers in any 
part of the U. S. or Canada. One fee registers 
in nine offices. More vacancies than teachers. 
Address all Applications to Pittsburg, Pa. 



. L. LEMBERGER. 



FRANK GL.BIM. 



LEMBERGER & CO., 
DRUGGISTS and PHARMACISTS. 

9th and Cumberland Sts.. LEBANON, PA. 

Our claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of first importance— ACCURACY. 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 



Patents 



TRADE MARKS* 
DESIGNS* 
COPYRICHTS &c 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, whether an invention is 
probably patentable. Communications strictly 
coniidential. Oldest agency forsecuring patents 
m a America. We have a Washington office. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the 

h SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
SPyseientific journal, veekly, terms $3.00 a year; 
♦J.&US1X months. Specimen copies and Hand 
book on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway, Mew York. 

^DOUBLE YOUR INCOME $ 

fl> by representing us during your leisure^ 
Jj hours. >g 

JSALARY PAID WEEKLY 

ifc to those giving entire time to our work. $ 
fa Address, giving age, occupation andw 
fa reference, <& 
I DODD, MEAD & CO., New York. # 



The Miller Organ 




Is the Finest and Best 
Organ Made. 



Sold all over the world 
upon its merits alone. 



SPECIAL 

INDUCEMENTS 

To Churches, Sunday 
Schools and Ministers. 



Write to us and get our 
prices and terms. 
Catalogue, etc., free. 



MILLER ORGAN CO., 

IiEBHflOrL pa. 

RISE & GATES, 




142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON. 

Special Inducements To Students. 

Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler. 

CLUB, COLLEGE £ FRATERNITY 
EMBLEMS, WATCHES, DIAM' 
ONDS, JEWELRY, X A) X X 



198 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates Furnished. 

WANTED— TRUSTWORTHY AND ACTIVE GEN- 
tlemen or ladies to travel for responsible, 
established house. Monthly $65.00 and expenses. Posi- 
tion steady. Reference. Enclose self-addressed stamped 
envelope. The Dominion Company, Dept. V., Chicago. 



Superior Advantages. 



Most Reasonable R ate 



Liebanon Valley College, 

FOUNDED 1866. 

Fot* liadies and Gentlemen. 

©<3^©<^(i*^©*^©^<V©' , ^©^^©<^.© 

1. Thirty-second Year Opened with Double the Attendance 
last Year. 

Three Commodious Buildings ; Full Classical, Scientific 
and Musical Courses, 

2. An able Faculty; High Standard ; Progressive Methods ; andi 
Well-selected Library. 

3. Environments of the Most Helpful Character in Social, Mora 
and Religious Life. 

4. A Fine Campus of about Ten Acres for Athletic Sports, and 
well-equipped Gymnasium. 

Winter Term begins January 3d 5 Spring Term, March 28, 1898, 

address, rev. H. U. ROOP, Ph. D., President, 

flnnville, Ps 



Webster's 
International 
Dictionary 

The One Great Standard Authority, 

So writes Hon. D. J. Brewer, 
Justice V. S. Supreme Court. 

Successor of th e 
"Unabridged." 

The Standard 

of the U. S. Gov't Printing 
Office, the U. S. Supreme 
Court, all the State Supreme 
Courts, and of nearly all the 
Schoolbooks. 

Warmly 2 
Commended 2 

by College Presidents, State A 
Superintendents of Schools, A 
and other Educators almost A 
without number. 

THE BEST FOR PRACTICAL USE. 
It is easy to find the word wanted. 
It is easy to ascertain the pronunciation. 
It is easy to trace the growth of a word. 
It is easy to learn what a word means. 

The Pennsylvania School Tournal says : 

— The International Webster is a treasure house 
of universal knowledge to which all the world, in 
all its ages, has made contribution, and any one 
of us may have it at lria eluow. 

ICT'Specimen pages sent on application to 
G. & C. MKRRIAM CO., Publishers, 
Springfield, Hass,, U.S.A. 
XXKMXXXX 



A.C. Zimmerman, 



DEAhER IN 





ill 



758 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis, 
Blank Book Manufacture 

AND JOB BOOK BINDER, 



. . . RULING, 
NUMBERING. 



WIRE.- 
STITCHING 



1125 and 1127 North Third % 
HARRISBURG, PA, 



JUflE, 1898. 



THE 



ollege 



LiEBflNON VALikEY COIiLtEGE, 



JR NAL PR| NT) ANNVILLE, PA. 



AflfiVlIiliE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS HP STATIONERY. 

22 East Main St, ANNVILLE 



Out* Shelves mv constantly filled with 
NHW, SHCOflD-HnriD and SHHUp WO^JM 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS, 

TOGETHER WITH A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

STATIO^E^Y, 
Wall PapeiTHWindom Shades. 



Shenk & Kinports, 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

Dealers in DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 
and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home 
made, Ingrain, and Brussels Carpets. You 
buy cheaper from us than away from home, 
and have a large stock to select from. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Theo, Leonhardt & Son, 

LITHOGRAPHERS. 

5th and Library Sts,, PHILA, 



A Selected Stock of the LATEST STYLES OF WALL 
PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

We Buy, Sell, and Exchange Old 
and New Text Books. 

Bicycles 

AND SUNDRIES. 

First-class, up-to-date Bicycles at $35.00 
and up. A full line of supplies for tho wheel. 
Light running wheels for rent. 

Repairing of all kinds promptly attended to. 

E. P. Anthony, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

J, R McCAULEY. 

DAILY MEAT MARKET, 

GOOD MEAT-LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, PA. 
1860. 1885. 

J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT, 

S. W. Comer 8th and Willow, LEBANON. 



Diplomas and Certificates of Membership, 
Also Commercial Work our Specialty, 

If you want to Boy a Hat Right, and a Right Hat, 
or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

00 70 Erb & Craumer, 

Eighth and Cumb. Sts,, LEBANON, P 

n. h. shaudT 

—DEALER IN— 

Gold Watches and Jeuielpy, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYSTOw 
AND CREAM. RNriVIIlllE, Pfc 



H, S, WOLF, 

DEALER IN 

Green Groceries and Confectioneries 

RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION. 



new Commonwealth 



anenw 

1 



753 Cumberland St., 

LEBANON, PA. 



Sboe Store. 



Makes it a special object to stents "j^ 



way of a liberal discount to buy their 
of them. 



tieir SH®1 



49* ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



JOSEPH MILLER, 
FURNITURE & UNDERTAKING 
West Main St., ANNVILLE, 



The College Forum 

A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF 

1.KI5ANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ITS STUDENTS AND FRIENDS. 



Vol. XI. Xo. 6. AXXVILLE, PA., JTJXE, 1898. WholeXo7i12^ 



YANKEE DEWEY, 



Yankee Dewey went to sea, 

Sailing on a cruiser; 
He took along for company 

Of men and guns, a few, sir. 

Yankee Dewey, Ha ! Ha ! Ha ! 

Dewey you're a dandy; 
With men and guns, and cruisers, too, 

You're certainly quite handy. 

He sailed away to the Philippines, 
With orders there to snatch them, 

And thrash the Spaniards right and left 
Wherever he could catch them. 

And Yankee Dewey did it, too, 

He did it so complete, sir, 
That not a blooming ship is left 

Of all that Spanish fleet, sir. 

Oh, Yankee Dewey, you're a peach, 

A noble, gallant tar, sir; 
You're 'out of sight, ' you're 'out of reach, ' 

We hail you from afar, sir. 

We greet you with three rousing cheers, 

For you and your brave crews, sir, 
For the deeds you've done and the victory 
won, 

For Yankee Doodle Doo, Sir. 

Yankee Dewey, keep it up, 

You certainly are handy 
With men and guns, and cruisers, too, 

Oh, Dewey, you're a dandy. 

WHY, 



■ ith the permission of the editor, 
try to answer some of the 
tions which have been asked 
tive to the "why" of certain phe 



ns 



nomena, which seem to be puzzling 
some thinkers. "What makes gun- 
powder 'go off,' and why doesn't it 
break a gun in pieces as it does a rock 
in which it has been placed." 

Gun-powder is made by an intimate 
mixing of nitre, sulphur and charcoal. 
It seems harmless as we hold it on our 
hand, but we know it will explode 
very easiiy if brought in contact with 
fire. There are three distinct parts 
into which an explosion may be di- 
vided, but which follow each other so 
quickly that our mind cannot mark 
the stages as we witness an explosion 
of gun-powder. The first touch of fire 
ignites the grains it touches, the in- 
flamed surface extends and the whole 
mass is very rapidly converted into 
gas, which pushes itself in every di- 
rection. It is the outward pressure of 
the gas formed, which drives the shot 
or ball before it and out of the mouth 
of a gun or cannon. This gas is shut 
into a small space and can escape but 
one way, and so it quickly follows the 
gun barrel and carries the ball along 
with it. Were shot placed on a pile of 
powder and the latter ignited in the 
open air, the gas formed would have 
a chance to press in many directions 
and would not exert a great force in 
any one direction, and consequently 



S2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



would not send the shot a great dis- 
tance. . 

In blasting rock a hole is drilled 
which in a way corresponds to the 
barrel of a gun. Into this hole is put 
so much powder that the space is in- 
adequate for the gas, and it cannot all 
escape through the open drill. The 
pressure of the gas is so much greater 
than the resistance of the rock that 
the latter is broKen. Were a propor- 
tionately large amount of powder put 
into a gun and ignited, there would 
not be room for it, and unless it was 
pressed so hard as to be very slowly 
exploded the gun would burst as the 
rock does. 

It is this principle of the pressure 
of gas formed from ignited powder 
which is made of use in the construc- 
tion of fireworks. The stream of es- 
caping gas makes the rocket shoot in- 
to the air. It pushes downward on 
the air, the air resists this pressure 
and the rocket rises. When the gas 
no longer escapes the rocket falls. 
The various shooting stars, wheels 
and other moving fireworks are caus- 
ed by the same action. 

"What are clouds and what is the 
real difference between fog, rain and 
snow ?" 

We know that water is constantly 
going into the air, not alone from bod- 
ies of water great and small, but from 
the skins of animals, from the breath, 
from the leaves of trees and plants 
and from the ground. Clouds are col- 
lections of minute particles of this 
moisture, held suspended in the air. 
Just how the air can hold up these 
particles has never been explained to 
satisfy all scientists. These particles 



of moisture exist in the air at all times 
but do not become visible to us in the 
form of cloud until a warmer curre 
of air surcharged with vapor pas 
over a colder surface and particles 
moisture are condensed into minu 
companies. We may say, for a simp] 
explanation, that fog is cloud near t" 
earth. When the companies of - 
nute particles become large enough 
form drops, we have rain-fall. Whe 
we have clouds and rain does not fal 
the particles of moisture in the cloud 
are in too small companies to for 
drops. As water goes into the a" 
from different objects and in differe 
ways, so in varied forms it com 
again to the earth. We have already 
said that when a cloud meets colder 
air the moisture is formed into drops 
and we have rain. When the air is 
cold enough to freeze, the water drops 
become solid, and as they fall through 
the air take many beautiful shapes 
and reach the earth as dainty snow- 
crystals. 

"What causes the brilliant colors of 
some sunsets ?" 

If a glass prism is held in the sun's 
rays we see seven different colors m 
the light cast by it. The prism to 
turned the sun's rays from a straight 
path and separated the white light in- 
to these colors. A piece of ice broken 
with rough edges will do the sarM 
so will dew-drops and the drops o 
rain which fringe the edge of clou 
after a shower. The sunlight shim 
on the rain-drops is divided into sev 
colors and we see a rainbow reflect 
on the sky as on a screen. The b 
liant colors of clouds are made by 
sun shining on drops of moisture 



I ff hich the clouds are formed. The 
' oorgeous colorings of clouds are more 
' common at morning- and night be- 
cause the sun strikes them at a right 
j angle to have its light reflected to our 
e ye. The color which we see is due 
t0 the different way the light is thrown 
back to us. Sometimes one color and 
sometimes another is bent in the way 
I to reach our eyes, and we behold a 
sunset rich in crimson or daintily 
touched with violet and gold. 
"Are furs warm ?" 

If by this question is meant are furs 
warm in themselves, the answer is — 
no, but they will keep our bodies 
warm when the air around is cold. 
This is done by keeping in the body 
its own heat. The air confined in the 
fibre of fur is a poor conductor of 
heat, and the finer and closer the fur 
the better it can keep the warmth of 
the body from escaping and mingling 
with the colder air around it. Any 
wrapping used to protect from the cold 
shields us not by the warmth which 
itself has, but by preventing the es- 
cape of heat from the body which it 
protects. We put furs on our bodies 
'or the same reason that we put storm 
doors and outside windows on our 
houses. In so doing we only imitate 
a wise provision of nature, who wraps 
m soft, velvety cradles the early buds, 
4at they shall not be chilled by the 
frosty breath of melting snow and ice. 



We 
Pride. 



a; 

rise in glory as we sink in 



Ask Mr. S. for his experience of his 
'tanical trips. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 83 
OUR MARTYRED MISSIONARIES, 

BY J. S. MILLS. 

The law of sacrifice is the first law 
of the kingdom of God. The life of 
the Master illustrated this fact, for 
even "the Son of Man came not to be 
ministered unto, but to minister and 
give his life a ransom for many." 
From the beginning obedience to this 
law has been the condition of human 
progress. The mother gives her life 
for her child, the patriot dies for his 
country, and the missionary for his 
King. 

When Brother Cain refused to fire 
on the black mob ready to slay the lit- 
tle party of whites, I have no doubt 
he consulted his noble comrades, and 
they said, "Let us lay down our lives 
for Africa even as our Saviour did for 
us." And they were at once enrolled 
in the great army of martyrs, who 
counted not their own lives dear unto 
themselves. The redemption of Afri- 
ca goes forward by such service. The 
graves of Christian missionaries and 
explorers are the stepping stones 
across the Dark Continent. It has 
pleased God to give our church the 
honor of furnishing a glorious band, 
who by this high offering of sacrifi- 
cial service has done so much to re- 
deem Africa. 

Other churches and other fathers 
and mothers have made similar offer- 
ings of their most precious sons and 
daughters. They are an offering unto 
the Lord of Hosts, and are enrolled in 
his book. The Missionary Krapf, dy- 
ing in the Galla country, bequeathed 
"to every missionary corning to East 
Africa" the "idea of a chain of mis- 
sions" across the entire Dark Conti" 



8 4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



nent. He said, "The first resident of 
the new mission ground is a dead per- 
son of the missionary circle ; our God 
bids us first build a cemetery before 
we build a church or dwelling-house, 
showing us by this lesson that the res- 
urrection of East Africa must be ef- 
fected by our own destruction." 

As the sacrifices which the earth has 
cost make it more deeply interesting 
and precious to heaven, so these sacri- 
fices for Africa will make it dearer 
and nearer to the hearts of all our 
people. Such royal instruments in 
that land will call forth still more ; 
for as Missionary Cox said, "Though 
a thousand fall let not Africa be giv- 
en up." 

While we to-day sorrow with the 
bereaved homes, through our tears we 
look up to our Great Commander and 
to the group of martyrs ascended to 
his presence, and greet him and them 
saying, u lVe offer a larger number of 
equally heroic souls for Africa. Com- 
mand, it is our joy to obey." 

GOOD MANNERS, 



Courtesy and consideration for oth- 
ers are demanded of a gentleman un- 
der all circumstances, and especially 
in trying situations. Good manners 
show themselves in respect for women 
in word and deed ; in manly regard 
for the feelings of equals ; in prompt 
and cheerful submission to disappoint- 
ments, and in honor, kindness, firm- 
ness, and justice toward the helpless. 
Vigorous health, great physical 
strength, and the excitement of com- 
petition, frequently ren d e r men 
brusque, uncivil, and even boisterous 



in their manners. The true athle 
however, will never lose sight of 
necessity for unshaken good tem 
and perfect urbanity and gentlen 
of manner, no matter how great t 
heat of the strife or the magnitude of 
the provocation. It is in the critical 
moment that the chance is given him 
to show whether he is a brute or a 
gentleman. 



REAR ADMIRAL DEWEY, 



The most prominent character in 
either army or naval circles, because 
of his most brilliant victory in Manila 
bay, unparalleled in naval engage- 
ments, is Commodore George Dewey, 
commander of our Asiatic squadron. 
On Monday, April 25th, he received 
news of the declaration of war, and 
owing to a declaration of neutrality 
was obliged to leave Hong Kong on 
Wednesday. He sailed for Manila, 
the capital of the Philippine Islands, 
and under cover of the darkness passed 
the batteries and harbor defend 
Saturday night April 30, and Sund; 
morning May 1, he annihilated the 
Spanish squadron, numbering eleven 
vessels, and silenced and destroyed 
three batteries. On Monday he oc- 
cupied the navy yard, blew up six 
batteries, cut the cable, established a 
blockade, and drove the Spanish forces 
out of Cavite. The next day he swept 
the lower bay for torpedoes. All this 
was accomplished with an estimated 
damage of only $5,000 to his fleet, and 
just eight men wounded, while the 
estimated damage inflicted upon the 



enemy is 1,200 killed and woun 
and property destroyed and captu 1 



ded, 



' valued at $6,000,000. 

Naval officers who have known 
pewey say that he possesses the rare 
. capacity of combining prudence with 
f daring- His dominant qualities are 
1 said to be courage, manliness, frank- 
, ness, shrewdness, and a keen sense of 
j honor. As a naval officer he has al- 
ways manifested the utmost confidence 
in himself and this has inspired con- 
fidence on the part of others. Of 
Green Mountain stock, he started in 
a life with a good heritage, and from 
e the time he graduated from the Naval 
a Academy in 1854 he had an honor- 

a 

^ able career. Vermont had confidence 
, in the promise of his boyhood, and 
I now she rejoices to honor him. His 
^ first appointment was to the steam 
frigate Wabash of the Mediterranean 
squadron. During the two or three 
years preceding the War of the Re- 
bellion young Dewey saw a variety of 
sea service and developed rapidly. 
Tta opening of hostilities found him 
onboard the steam frigate Mississippi 
of the west gulf squadron, and there, 
although serving in a subordinate ca- 
pacity, he made a splendid record. 

During the war he distinguished 
himself for bravery on many occasions. 
He figured in the capture of New 
Cleans April, 1862 ; did gallant ser- 
vlce atPort Hudson, March, 1863,— 
running the batteries and capturing 
F °rt Fisher. Nearly all of the ser- 

r 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



35 



ad 



Uce s in which Lieutenant Dewey en- 
* a ged were of a vigorous and danger- 
he 0u s character, and his bravery received 
he Seated commendation. 

frigate Mississippi was destroy- 
111 the Mississippi river after a 
lb born fight. Dewey was the last 



I 
ed led 



man to leave the sinking frigate and 
Admiral Porter in commenting on 
this incident said : " It is in such try- 
ing moments that men show of what 
mettle they are made, and in this in- 
stance the mettle was the best." 

Since his connection with our navy 
Commodore Dewey has seen fifteen 
and a half years sea service and twenty- 
three and a half years on shore. At 
the close of the war he was commis- 
sioned lieutenant commander. For 
the next few years he served on differ- 
ent ships of the European squadron. 
In 1872 he was placed in command of 
the Narragansett. Subsequently he 
served for a while on the Government 
Lighthouse Board, of which he was 
secretary for a time. In 1884 he was 
made captain, and commanded the 
dispatch boat Dolphin. Returning to 
shore duty, Capt. Dewey served three 
or four years as chief of the bureau of 
equipment with the rank of commo- 
dore. He was promoted commodore 
February 20, 1896, and on January 3d 
last, assigned t6 the command of the 
Asiatic squadron. May 7, Commodore 
Dewey was promoted Acting Rear 
Admiral of the United States Navy by 
President McKinley as a reward 



'highly distinguished conduct/ 



for 

and Congress tendered a vote of 
thanks to him and his men by request 
of the President. 




Popular Now, 

Dick — Did you hear about poor 
Kirby? He has the fever, and his 
friends have given up all hope. 

Nick— That's too bad. Typhoid ? 

Dick— No; Klondike. 



86 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



RESPECT FOR THE FLAG, 



The new cadet at the National Mil- 
itary Academy, whether he has come 
from the little country school with its 
home-made flag and staff, or from the 
city school where floats sometimes a 
flag big enough to cover half the roof 
of the other school, has been taught 
to respect the beautiful emblem of his 
country ; but he will learn at West 
Point, as soon as he begins his career 
as a future officer of the army, how 
thoroughly he is to be trained to honor 
it in his daily life. The laughing 
school-boy salute he has perhaps given 
the flag from time to time now be- 
comes a matter of sober ceremony, so 
rigidly required and handsomely or- 
dered that it at once sets him to think- 
ing ; and the good, sound patriotism 
that was in him all along soon envel- 
opes every glimpse and ceremony of 
the colors with a sacredness that will 
deepen day by day. 

One of his first lessons is to doff his 
cap every time he passes the "color- 
line" where the color is guarded by a 
sentinel. Every summer the cadets 
pass several months in camp on the 
lovely banks of the Hudson, and be- 
neath the grand old trees of the acad- 
emy grounds. 

During certain hours of the day a 
long line of stacked rifles extends 
along the front of the ca;np. Across 
the two stacks in the centre of the 
line is laid the color, rolled about its 
staff. Up and down by this flag 
inarches a natty cadet sentinel, and 
woe be unto the unlucky cadet who 
tries to pass this sacred trust without 
raising his cap. 

So during his life at the academy 



this lesson of respect is continued, and 
when he has "doffed the cadet and 
donned the brevet, and changed the 
gray for the blue," and reported f or 
duty with his regiment, he finds the 
same lessons being taught the enlisted 
men, and then probably for the first 
time does he realize the full import- 
ance of those early lessons taught in 
that far-away school-house. — St. Nich- 
olas. 

AMONG THE COLLEGES, 



Mr. Andrew Carnegie has given 
$50,000 for a technical school at Dmn- 
ferline, Scotland. 

The University of Chicago has 
ceived a gift of about $150,000 fro 
an anonymous donor. 

Mr. Amos R. Eno, the New Yc 
multimillionaire, who died a 
weeks ago, left $50,000 to Amhe 
college. 

The Teachers' College, Colin 
University, has received from 
anonymous donor a gift of $40,1 
Three other gifts of $25,000 each ha 
been received since December 1st. 

Henry S. Little, of Trenton, N. 
well known in New Jersey poW 
for twenty-five years a Democr 
leader, has given to Princeton U$ 
sity $100,000 to erect a new dorinito 

The will of the late Jacob W 
gives the residue of his estate, & 
mated at $3,000,000, to the^ P 
Tome Institute of Port Deposit, H: 
which during his lifetime he w 
founded and richly endowed. 

Princeton and Harvard met on 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



87 



evening of May 6th, at Cambridge, 
for their annual debate. The ques- 
tion for discussion was, "Resolved, 
That the present restrictions on im- 
migration into the United States are 
insufficient. 

President Andrew S. Draper, of the 
University of Illinois, having declined 
the Superiutendency of the schools of 
New York City, Dr. W. H. Maxwell, 
Superintendent of the Brooklyn 
schools, was elected Superintendent 
on March 15th. 

As the Phillips Brooks House at 
Harvard nears completion, the good 
work with which it is to be associated 
are furthered by substantial gifts. 
The widow of an Episcopal clergy- 
man, the Rev. W. B. Noble, endows a 
lectureship with $20,000; from the 
estate of a lady in Roxbury comes 
$15,000, somewhat more directly for 
the philanthropic purposes of the 
house, and the will of a graduate of 
1882 is liberally interpreted to yield 
$5,000 to the resources of the new 
enterprise. These things are but in- 
dications of the living influences of 
the dead man. 

WITH THE EXCHANGES, 

We find a wider field for comment 
m the exchange world than usual, ow- 
ln g to the many commencement num- 
bers that have reached us. 

"The Mercerian" is one of our 
strongest exchanges in a literary line. 
The present (commencement) number 
is especially fine. 

We note the Publication number of 
the "College Student" among our ex- 



changes. We are always glad to wel- 
come the Student with its classic air. 
It contains a well written poem, "Par- 
athumion." This number also has 
very fine cuts. 

It might be well for us to see our- 
selves as others see us, hence we shall 
take the liberty to quote some of the 
Forum's critics. 

"The Mercerian" says : "The arti- 
cle, America — A Climax, in the COL- 
LEGE Forum, is well worth reading-. 
Briefly sketching the older nations of 
the earth and their importance, the 
author leads up to America and gives 
splendid reasons why America is the 
climax of nations." 

"The College Forum, of Lebanon 
Valley College while not strong in a 
literary line yet amply supplies the 
need of the college, serving as a me- 
dium between the student body and 
its friends. It presents a neater ap- 
pearance than formerly by the omis- 
sion of cut on title page." 

The above has been taken from the 
F. & M. "Student." While it is very 
sharp it is also too true. Why can 
we not have more literary contribu- 
tions ? 

We take the following from the 
"Criterion" : 

"The College Forum contains sev- 
eral interesting selections, especially 
the 'Influence of Noble Women.' Some 
pretty gems from the last issue are : 

'The tears of affection are dew-drops 
from the blue sky of the soul.' 

'Hope makes for every man a gold- 
en to-morrow. It shines through the 
tears of the present to span the future 
with its bow of promise.' " 



i 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



88 

The College Forum, 

THE COLLEGE FORUM is published monthly 
throughout the college year by the Philokosmian 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College, 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

O. P. DeWitt, '98, Editor-in-Chief. 
Jay W. Yoe, '98. C. E. Snoke, '00. 

C. V. CI.IPPINGER, '99. R. R. BUTTERWICK, '01. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

W. G. Clippinger, '99, Business Manager. 

S. F. Daugherty, '00, Assistant Business Manager. 

Terms s Twentyvfive cents a year, five cents a copy. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be forwarded to 
all subscribers until an order is received for its dis' 
continuance, and until all arrearages have been paid. 



Address all communications, articles for publication, 
exchanges, etc., to W. G. Clippinger, Box 86, Aim- 
ville, Pa. 

Entered at the Post Ollice at Annville, Pa., as second- 
class mail matter. 



EDITORIALS, 



WE are somewhat late with our 
last issue of the year. We give our 
readers a double number this time, 
and trust that the effort on our part 
will be appreciated by our family of 
readers generally. We have labored 
to give all the commencement news 
in brief, yet to slight none. This be- 
ing the combined numbers for June 
and September there will, therefore, 
be no issue of the Forum for Septem- 
ber. We wish all our subscribers and 
friends a very well spent vacation. 
* 

* * 

The tide of public opinion is al- 
most unanimous in favor of America 
having a navy commensurate with her 
position among the great nations. It 
is gratifying to know that congress is 
in harmony with patriotic spirit and 



a bill is pending for the construction 
of forty-five war vessels, five of which 
are to be first-class cruisers, heavily 
armored ; ten torpedo boats, fifteen tor- 
pedo boat destroyers and fifteen steel 
gunboats. The limit of expenditure 
is placed at $39,250,000. The gov- 
ernment has now five battleships in 
process of construction, three of which, 
the Alabama, Kentucky and Rear- 
sarge, have been launched. When 
this proposed naval strength is com- 
pleted the United States will feel that 
she may hope to command a degree 
of respect among the naval powers of 
the world. 

The navies of the world at present 
rank, first, Great Britain ; second, 
France; third, Russia ; fourth, Italy; 
fifth, United States ; sixth, Germany 
seventh, Spain ; eighth, Japan ; ninth, 
Austria ; tenth, Netherlands. 

* * 
* 

The sinking of the Merrimac by 
Lieut. Hobson and crew of seven men 
in the narrow entrance to Santiago 
harbor, for the purpose of blocking 
egress for Cervera's fleet will be re- 
corded in history as one of the most 
daring acts of naval warfare in the his- 
tory of the world. Imagine a long 
narrow channel with grim forts c 
both sides equipped with modern gu 
capable of concentrating their fire i 
any particular point; imagine tl 
channel underlaid with mines capable 
of blowing his ship to atoms and then 
imagine a few men with a single < 
fenseless, unwieldy ship of sevei 
hundred feet in length attempting 
run such a fearful gauntlet, reach 
certain point, and blow up their o\ 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



89 



ship with possibly no means of escape 
even should they reach that point 
alive, and you have an idea of the 
startling undertaking made by these 
heroes. It is at once evident that 
when they said good-bye to their com- 
rades it was with an almost certain 
feeling that they would never meet 
again. It was like going to a certain 
death, for only the intervention of 
Providence, or miracle, could carry 
them safely through such an ordeal. 

All honor to the brave heroes of the 
Merrimac, give them a place with 
Dewey, with Perry, Farragut, dish- 
ing and others of immortal naval 
fame. Such deeds are more powerful 
than armies in giving inspiration and 
enthusiasm to patriots. Hobson's and 
Dewey's triumphs will nerve the arms 
and hearts of other heroes, who will 
prove equally daring in defending 
their country's honor. Their invinci- 
ble courage and matchless devotion 
will silence with burning shame the 
mutterings of traitor or coward, if 
such there should be ; they will be- 
come at once the pride of our country 
and the wonder of heroism and pa- 
triotism to an awe-struck world. 

* * 
* 

If there is one thing above all 
others, which many college students 
ar e inclined to neglect, it seems to be 
social culture. We know that stu- 
dents have lessons to prepare, and that 
] s often difficult to spare ah evening 
r social purposes. But we should 
>t forget that social ability is one of 
e strongest levers for success in life, 
college education is pre-eminently 
a Preparation for a broader life than is 



open to the untrained. A good edu- 
cation must be practical ; it must be 
broad, it must be well rounded. Too 
many think education is the study of 
books. It is more nearly the study of 
man, and his surroundings, and the 
possibilities which open before him. 
Education is the drawing out of man's 
nature into its multitudinous direc- 
tions. The social nature is a part of 
man, and the drawing out of the social 
impulses, is as much a part of educa- 
tion, as is the mental training of the 
mind. No education is complete, 
which leaves one a recluse, incapable 
of mixing with his fellows without 
embarassment, and an unpleasant con- 
sciousness of self in every movement. 
College life offers opportunities for 
social culture that no student can af- 
ford to throw away. Give yourself a 
broad education, round yourself out 
along the lines of your nature, social 
as well as mental. The feelings are 
as important as the mind. They are 
the springs of action. They are the 
seat of friendship and all that makes 
life pleasant. There is no reason 
why students should wait until their 
junior or senior year before entering 
the social life of college. The senior, 
and especially the graduate, as he en- 
ters broader and broader fields, seldom 
fails to regret having slighted social 
culture during the early part of his 
college course. 

* * 

Mr. H. (upon leaving Miss B.) — 
"Good-bye, don't cry." 

* * 
( xive 'em Fitz ! 

Sampson ! 

Schlev 'em ! 



9 o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



PERSONALS. 

R. R. Bntterwick caught fourteen 
eels on the evening of the 14th inst. 

Miss Bessie Landis, of Hummels- 
town, came to see her Senior friends 
graduate. 

Misses Klugh and Bodmer, of High- 
spire, were the guests of Miss Putt, at 
the Ladies' Hall. 

Miss Mame K. Haverstick, of Neffs- 
ville, a student of the fall term, was a 
guest at the Hall. 

Miss Emma Heilman, of Jonestown, 
visited Annville friends during com- 
mencement week. 

Miss Anna Snyder was called home 
before school closed on account of the 
sickness of her sister. 

Miss Nellie Buffington, who went 
home on account of sickness, paid the 
school a visit during commencement 
week. 

The mother of C. V. Clippinger 
came from Taney town, Md., to wit- 
ness the exercises of graduates and to 
visit Clarence. 

Mr. C. V. Clippinger, '99, will stay 
at Lebanon until the season opens at 
Gretna, at which place he will spend 
the summer. 

Miss Margaretta Miller, of Harris- 
burg, was a spectator at her sister 
Louise's graduation. She was the 
guest of the Misses Herr. 

H. H. Hoy, of Killinger, returned 
to the old classic halls to visit with 
his friends. He has been working in- 
surance since leaving school in the 
spring. He will be with us in the 
fall. 



T. W. Gray ; of Donnelly's Mills, and 
the parents of I. W. Huntzberger 
from Elizabethtown, were the guests 
of the latter gentleman for a few days 
during the week. 

Harry Heberly, '96, York, p a _. 
Estella Stehman, '96, Mountville ; the 
father of Anna Myers, of Mountville; 
the mother and father and two sisters 
of J. W. Yoe, were also among friends 
and aided to swell the number and to 
make the big; week a success. 



X 



PHILO ANNIVERSARY. 



A neat monogram invitation ser 
out to friends of the institution an- 
nounced the thirty-first anniversary of 
the Philokosmian Literary Society. 
The crowning event of the year was 
held in the College Chapel on the eve- 
ning of the sixth ultimo. The hall 
was filled with friends, members and 
ex-members of the society. Standing 
room was at a premium. On the 
stage were the finest potted plants and 
flowers that the county could afford. 

Three of the most talented orators 
in the institution had been selected to 
entertain the vast audience with their 
ready flow of eloquence. They did 
not deceive us for every one who heard 
the rendition of the program spoke in 
the highest terms of praise for each 
performer. 

Professor O. P. DeWitt gave a mas- 
terly oration on the subject, U A Halt 
in Moslemism." Irvin E Runk held 
second place of honor and delivered a 
fine oration on "The Popery of P°h' 
tics." Mr. Runk well merits the title 
of "The Silver Tongued Orator of tte 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



9i 



Institution." The third- oration was 
an eulogy on A. J. Gordon by the 
atchless champion of oratory Walter 
Clippiuger. "Education the Nurse of 
Liberty" was the subject of a profound 
and well rendered essay by our genial 
riend, Galen D. Light. 

The oration by the ex-member was 
given by S. O. Goho, A.M., of Harris- 
burg, Pa., and was a masterly and well 
rendered production. The Persever- 
ance Orchestra enlivened the evening's 
exercises by its well chosen and very 
classically rendered music after each 
number on the program. 
After the completion of the program 
e wended our way to the large din- 
ng hall in the ladies' building where 
th esociety gave a banquet to all friends 

I of the institution Everything passed 
off without a hitch or jar to mar the 
happiness of the occasion, and all 
present were unanimous in the opin- 
ion that it was not only the greatest 
event of the entire year but the best 
anniversary that had ever been wit- 
nessed at Lebanon Valley College. 

a; 

ALUMNI ET ALUMNAE. 

Quite a large number of alumni 
were present during commencement 
eek. They were glad to visit once 
ain their Alma Mater. 

Rev. J. G. W. Herold, '93, West 
ewfield, Me., completed the Post- 
r aduate course and received the de- 
e e Doctor of Philosophy. The 
me degree was also conferred upon 
ac ob H. Reber, '95, principal of the 
u ntingdon High School. 

R ev. S C. Enck, '91 ; Samuel F. 



Huber, '94 ; Prof. H. Lenich Meyer, 
'94, received the degree of Master of 
Arts in course. 

Orville P. DeWitt, '98, has been 
elected supervising principal of Roy- 
ersford schools. Mr. DeWitt has 
charge of twelve schools and thirteen 
teachers. There were in all fifty-four 
applicants among whom were gradu- 
ates from Princeton, Franklin and 
Marshall, Ursinus, and a host of nor- 
mal school graduates. This speaks 
well for Mr. DeWitt and Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Miss Louise Rowse Miller, '98, has 
been elected Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages in York College, York, Ne- 
braska. 

We have secured for the readers of 
the Forum the Alumnal Ode. It will 
appear in another column. We had 
hoped also to publish the address de- 
livered by Rev. Long, but for want of 
space it has been delayed until our 
next issue. 

J. H. Maysilles, '95, Philadelphia, 
visited his sister, Miss Flora, during 
the week. 

Geo. Ulrich and his brother, Adam, 
returned to see the Seniors graduate. 

The alumni and friends will be in- 
terested to know that the Bizarre, of 
which notice was given in former is- 
sues, is now for sale. It is a beautiful 
book bound in board covers, in white 
and blue, is elaborately illustrated 
with steel engravings, half-tones and 
zinc etchings, and contains about 175 
pages. Price, one dollar. Address all 
orders to W. G. Clippinger, Annville, 
Pa. 



9 2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Ruth Mumma, '96, of Lancaster, 
Pa., was the guest of Miss Mary 
Kreider during the commencement 
week. 

On Wednesday evening the Alumni 
Association had a public meeting. 
An interesting program had been pre- 
pared for the occasion. The follow- 
ing is the program as rendered : 

Music — Selection, College Quartette, '95 

Invocation, 

Remarks by the President, Rev. Garman, '96 
Piano Duett — Rosamunde, Schubert 

Misses Moyer, '86, '88. 
Essay — Needs of the Day, 

Mrs. Alice Heagy, '77 
Violin Solo — (a) Mazourka, W'ieniawski 
(6) Gypsies, Sarasate 
Prof. Emil Taube. 
Alumnal Ode — Prelude, Pean, Poem, Postlude, 
N C. Schlichter, '97 
Vocal Solo — Oh ! Down they go to the Sea in 
Ships, Nevin 
C. H. Sleichter, '96. 
Address, J. G. W. Herold, '93 

Piano Solo, Urban Hershey, '95 

Address — The Ministry of Money, 

Rev. A. A. Long, '89 
Music, College Quartette, '95 

ALUMNAL ODE. 

NORMAN COEESTOCK SCHLICHTER, '97. 

PRELUDE. 
Hark ! Daughter of the classic brow, 
We homeward come to praise thee now ! 
Within thy radiant halls we meet 

From far and wide 

To bless thy side 
And chant our chorals at thy feet, 

Daughter of Learning ! 
O lovely Daughter, thine we be, 
Men and women of purity, 
With faith of steel and love as strong 
Endowed to sing the Muse's song. 

PEAN. 

Young and fair and blither far 
Than an)- late-born evening star. 
Stationed on our mental shore 
A light before the open door 



To learning., love and fame, 
We loudly praise thy name ! 

Reared within thy morning hour, 
O Land of lands, earth's ruling flower, 
Watered with the dews of God 
Thine every heart, thine even' sod, 
High be our praise to thee, 
College of Liberty ! 

POEM. 

Uplifted in this memoried porch 
Behold the trusty torch 
Of June aflame with light the violets know, 
Whose rays in wreathes of welcome rise 
To summon from the skies, 
Great souls of wonder in their breasts of sno 

Bestowed on all who glorify 
The talents dowered from the Mind on hig 

And now the torch has flashed afar 
Its kind, compelling star 
To Aidenn's farthest vale of endless rest. 
One moment more, and lo ! we feel 
Great presences a-kneel 
Among us in their golden garments dressed, 

Each come to claim thee as his own, 
Daughter of Learning, on thy noble throne. 

True Tennyson, the minstrel heart, 
Is here and first to start 
A thrilling chorus from the Vale of Song. 
Learned Etter gladly lifts his head 
As if no love were dead 
Amid the mighty, multiplying throng 

Of men. I wish 'twere even so; 
But bend with vigor still your virtuous how 

Tho vaster bulwarks raise to doubt 
And faith seems scarce about [wid 
The spheres, remember that the worlds 
That God's good angels still come down 
To stifle sin, and drown 
Desertion's hosts in deep devotion's tide. 

Oh, hushed be earth's fault-finding ton 
While myriad bells of Heaven in her are 

Full blinded be the eyes that see 
No touch of Deity 
Along the wondrous, wrestling ways oi Ml 
Full deaf the ear that cannot hear 
Assuring, constant, clear, 
Forgiving voices high above the strife. 

Awaken human hearts that sleep, 
There's yet in earth a love for you to keep. 

Beethoven, Handel, Bach, Mozart 
Who built their sainted art 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



93 



In tone, for centuries of future fame ; 

Rare Browning, poet; Plate, sage; 

Stand ready to engage 
In one triumphal mention of thy name 

By all these guests, the great of earth, 
Who turned their greatness to an angel's birth. 

Thus do these mighty men of time 
Tonight within our clime, 
Reveal the high-born honor of this seat 
Of Wisdom, where when young we came 
To light the inner flame 
That fires our hearts to victory complete. 

Then rise anew to take her hand 
And spread with might this honor in the land. 

Be men and women far too proud 
To wear the darksome shroud 
Of cowardice and treason to your day ! 
Exalt the life 't is yours to live, 
Forbear, forewarn, forgive, 
And grace no station where you may not pray 

For every heart that leaves its King 
Doth starve for truth and thirst for reasoning. 

Yea, live that when the glorious sun 
Forgets his course to run, 
Across the mighty latitudes of day, 
Your soul shall gain her Aidenn fair, — 
A heritage of prayer — 
Estranged from pain as children in their play, 

Reclaimed by him who knoweth best 
That He, Himself, is Wisdom's utmost quest. 

PRAYER. 
Almighty God, whose fingers trace 

The arcs eternal of the soul, 
We wait before Thy wondrous face 
As Spring before her blossom-dole, 
To praise Thee for the years that came 
And left a being and a name 
Upon our Alma Mater dear, 
And built the history her men revere ! 

A splendid past ! a trophied hour 

To bless the memory of time 
As thoughts of love would bless a tower 
For one confined, or make sublime 
A man's most menial pain. — 
°. hail it with high refrain, 
All hearts attentive held to-night 
In raptures woven by our College light ! 

We wait before Thy wondrous face 
To pray Thee for the years to be ! 

The past that was, ran well its race; 
So help the long futurity. 
Whate'er the onward years may bring 



Diminish not the blossoming 
Of stalwart faith in every mind, 
And teach us well: to doubt is to be blind. 

That Truth can guild the lowest spire, 

Can crown the humblest head, a king; 
Can touch the wiser minds to fire 
And turn to song earth's sorrowing ! 
We also plead that love be taught 
To glorify ten fold our thought, 
And place a glow within our eyes 
That men may know us kindest of the wise. 

O clothe our arms with strength divine, 

Endow our hands with matchless skill, 
That we may pile upon this shrine 
A palace pleasing to Thy will ! 
Increase the workmen day by day 
Till everywhere men rise to say : 
Behold abundant-built and blessed, 
This is the Crown of learning in the West ! 

POSTI,UDE. 
Hark ! Daughter of the classic brow, 
Our tones grow few, but sweeter now. 
Within thy radiant halls we meet 
From far and wide 
To bless thy side 
And pledge devotion at thy feet, 
Daughter of Learning ! 
O lovely Daughter, thine we be, 
Men and women of purity, 
W T ith faith of steel and love and strong 
To form the finis of our song ! 
Philadelphia. 

At 

Woman has many qualities, among 
which, in our judgment, the first sev- 
en are : devotion, altruism, patience, 
gentleness, compassion, purity and 
faithfulness. Ruskin gave as the five 
talents of woman, those she developes 
in feeding, clothing, instructing, edu- 
cating and pleasing. 

Nature has given to man a fearless 
and daring nature. His qualities run 
somewhat after the following: Self- 
reliance, strength, power, courage, mag- 
nanimity, penetration, generalization, 
ideas. These are largely the heritage 
of woman. 



94 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK. 

The last week of the college year is 
always a very busy, and quite often, a 
very trying one. The events of the 
week were preluded by two very ap- 
propriate and entertaining events. 
The first occurred on Thursday eve- 
ning, being a reception to the Seniors 
given by Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Kreid- 
er, in honor of their son Edwin, who 
is a member of the class. A 5 o'clock 
dinner was served in exquisite style, 
after which various games were en- 
joyed by the members of the class. 

On Friday evening President and 
Mrs. H. U. Roop gave the Annual 
Reception to the Seniors. The mem- 
bers of the faculty and Mrs. Roop's 
voice students were present and aided 
very materially in making the enter- 
tainment of the evening a decided suc- 
cess. The hours, "from 8 to 10 
o'clock" were strictly observed. A 
luncheon of ice cream and cake was 
served in splendid style to all present. 
The good Bishop and wife were also 
present and added their mirth and en- 
joyment to the evening's entertain- 
ment. 

THE BACCALAUREATE SERMON 
was preached on Sunday, the 12th, 
by Pres. Roop, in the College Chapel. 
He took for his text the 34th verse of 
the 17th chapter of Acts. The Se- 
niors occupied the first four front seats. 
On the stage were the Bishop of the 
church, the leading local and foreign 
ministers. The Stars and Stripes very 
appropriately graced the back ground 
of the stage. To the front were fine 
flowers and plants, behind which and 
to one end of the stage with the two 
new pianos sat an excellent choir of 



sixteen voices led by Prof. Lehma 
Doctor Roop gave an excellent d : 
course to the attentive audience an 
to the grave and dignified Seniors. 

THE BIBLE NORMAL UNION 

held its commencement exercises 
Sunday evening at 7.30. A full house 
had come to greet the large class of 
graduates in this department of the 
college. The first number on the pro- 
gram was an oration by C. V. Clip- 
pinger. Miss Alma Light gave a 
recitation, and H. L,. Eichinger read 
an easy. Rev. J. A. Lyter, A. M., de- 
livered the address to the class. Good 
music interspersed the program at 
every point. At the close of the pro- 
gram the audience sang "America" 
with vigor. The program was some- 
what lengthy but was well appreciated. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

held its graduating exercises on Mo 
day evening before a large and appr 
ciative audience. Although ther 
were but two graduates, Miss M 
Kreider and Miss Stella K. Sargen 
they made in quality what they lac 
ed in quantity. A good program W 
rendered, which showed talent an 
thorough preparation for the wor 1 
both by the graduates and their frien 
who aided in the execution of t 
program. 

This department has been chang 
somewhat for the coining year, 
loses two very thorough and co 
scientious workers, Prof. Wilde a 
Miss Carrie Smith. Prof. Wilde g" 
to Albright College, and the g~ 
wishes of L. V. C. go with him. Mi 
Smith resigned her position as p 
fessor of Instrumental Music and T 
ory, early in the year, but remain 



with us three years and has given 
good, faithful service. The entire 
student body and the town are very 
sorry that she will not be with us 
longer. She leaves of her own accord 
with the good wishes of all. She has 
had some good positions offered her 
for the coming y.ar, but she has not, 
as yet, decided if she will teach next 
year. 

Professor Emil Taube, of the Har- 
risburg Conservatory of Music, has 
been elected as professor of stringed 
instruments. This is a new departure 
for L. V. C, and we most heartily 
welcome him to our midst, trusting 
that his associations will be mutually 
beneficial. 
THE NEW CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

will be presided over by one who has 
had much experience, and is in every- 
way thoroughly qualified for the work. 
It is with a feeling of pride that we 
welcome to our midst Professor Her- 
bert Oldham, F. S. Sc., L. L. C. M., 
of Iowa, as the first Director of the 
Conservatory of Music. He is a grad- 
uate of Trinity College, Dublin ; also 
of the London College of Music. He 
has studied extensively on the conti- 
nent, especially in France and Ger- 
many. He will reside in Annville. 

The new conservatory of which the 
professor is to be in charge, will be 
four stories high of Corinthian archi- 
tecture. The main auditorium will 
have a seating capacity of eight hun- 
dred and is to be furnished with opera 
chairs and suitable furnishings. A 
well proportioned stage will have ante 
rooms on the side. A large pipe or- 
gan will grace the rear of the stage. 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 



95 



The remainder of the building- will 
contain eight practice rooms, the col- 
lege library, reading room, a private 
room for the director, etc. 

On Tuesday evening Bishop Kep- 
hart delivered a masterly address be- 
fore the literary societies. The only 
criticism we have to make is, that 
more should have braved the heat and 
come to hear the production. 

The Seniors held their Class Day 
exercises on Wednesday at 2.30 p. m. 
A large audience had assembled to 
listen to the exercises. Two of the 
speakers faled to materialize, and the 
following program was rendered : 

Class History, Jay W. Yoe. 

Class Poem, J. R. Geyer. 

Class Prophecy, A. U. Baer. 

Junior Presentation, Bessie Kinports. 

Response, W. G. Clippinger. 

The Perse Orchestra, of Lebanon, 
furnished the music for the occasion. 

THE ALUMNI MEETING 
occurred on Wednesday evening at 
7.30. Some of the former talent of 
L. V. C. again graced the stage. Fol- 
lowing is the program as rendered : 

Music, College Quartette, '95. 

Remarks by President, 

Rev. Sheridan Garman, '96 
Piano Duett, The Misses Moyer, '86, '88 

Essay — Needs of the Day, 

Mrs. Alice Heagy, '77 
Violin Solo, Prof. Emil Taube 

Alumnal Ode, N. C. Schlichter, '97 

Vocal Solo, C. H. Sleichter, '96 

Address, Rev. J. G. W. Herold, '93 

Piano vSolo, Urban Hershey, '95 

Essay — The Ministry of Money, 

Rev. A. A. Long, '89 
Music, College Quartette 

After the rendition of the program 
the alumni gathered in the dining 
hall of the college where the alumni 
banquet was served. After the inner 
man had been feasted with all the 



9 6 



THE COEEEGK FORUM. 



delicacies in and out of season, Prof. 
Daugherty, acting as toast-master, call- 
ed on speakers from the different 
classes who responded with much wit 
and wisdom. Much business was 
then transacted with reference to the 
college. Owing to the failure of our 
reporter to report, we are unable to 
give the names of officers for the en- 
suing year. 

On Thursday at ten o'clock the reg- 
ular 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
were held in the College Chapel. The 
hall was again filled with anxious 
friends. 

The class and faculty occupied the 
stage, as did Prof. Jacob Reber and 
Rev. J. G. W. Herold. The two lat- 
ter gentlemen received the degree of 
Ph. D. The Hon. D. B. Brunner 
made the address to the class, after 
which President Roop called up the 
graduates and presented the diplomas 
in a very neat and characteristic 
speech. 

A composition orchestra from Har- 
risburg and Middletown rendered the 
music for the occasion. 

At the close of the Senior Recep- 
tion on Thursday evening, the events 
of the Commencement of 1898 had 
passed into history, the tired and anx- 
ious student had already begun to pack 
his trunk and ask a thousand and one 
questions of the ticket agent concern- 
ing his train. The heavy-headed Ju- 
nior has now assumed the dignified 
robe of the Senior and the world moves 
on as ever. 

X 

There is more heroism in self-denial 
than in deeds of arms. — Ex. 



BASE BALL 



On Saturday, May 7th, the L. V. C. 
team crossed bats with the Lebanon 
Business College and beat them by a 
score of 32 to 3. 

On May 30th, E V. C. vs. Myers- 
town. Score, L. V. C. 10; Myers- 
town, 2. 

On June 3, L. V. C. vs. Ursinus Col- 
lege. Score, E V. C , 4 ; Ursinus, 9. 

On June 4th, E. V. C. vs. A. C. I. 
of Myerstown. Score, E. V. C, 8 ; A 
C. L, 9. 



Harris- 
Harris- 



On June nth, L. V. C. vs. 
burg. Score, E V. C, 10; 
burg, 2. 

On June 13, L. V. C. vs. Highspire 
Athletics. Score, E. V. C, 18; High- 
spire, 3. 

On June 14th, E V. C. vs. Lebanon 
Athletics. Score, E V. C, 57 ; Leb- 
anon, 4. 

On June 15th, E V. C. vs. Steel- 
ton. Score, L. V. C, 7 ; Steelton, 8. 

x 

A PLEASANT WALK. 



On Ascension Day the following 
students spent the afternoon at that 
beautiful and romantic nook known 
as Lovers' Leap : 

Misses Grabill, Myers, Moyer, Herr, 
Light, Hartz, Seltzer, Trabert, Mary 
Kreider, Shelley, Kinports, Black. 

Messrs. C. V. Clippinger, Huntz- 
berger, Batdorf, Imboden, Oyer, Smith, 
Snoke, W. S. Roop, Yoe, Garland. 

X 

Prof. — "Why don't you speak loud- 
er when you recite ?" 

Boy — "A soft answer turneth away 
wrath." — Ex. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



97 



WHAT SOME AUTHORS EARN, 



Mr. Gladstone's price for a review 
w as $ 1,000. 

Conan Doyle received $35,000 for 
Rodney Stone. 

Ruskin's 65 books bring him in 
$2 0,000 a year. 

Swinburne, who writes very little, 
makes $5,000 a year by His poems. 

Anthony Hope charges $450 for a 
magazine story, reserving the copy- 
right. 

Browning, in his later years, drew 
$10,000 a year from the sale of his 
works. 

Ian Maclaren made $35,000 out of 
The Bonnie Brier Bush and Auld 
Lang Syne. 

Tennyson is said to have received 
60,000 a year from the Macmillans 
during the last years of his life. 

Zola's first 14 books returned him 
$220,000, and in 20 years he has made 
at least $375,000. 

Mr. Moody is believed to have beat- 
en all others, as more than $1,250,000 
has been paid in royalties for the gos- 
pel hymns and tunes issued by him 
n conjunction with Mr. Sankey. 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward received $40,- 
000 for Robert Elsmere, $80,000 each 
for David Grieve and Marcella, $75,- 
°oo for Sir George Tressady, and $15,- 
°oo for Bessie Costrell. 

The Pall Mall Gazette paid Rud- 
yard Kipling $750 for each of his 
Arrack Room Ballads, and The Sev- 
en Seas brought him $11,000. He 



has received 50 cents a word for a 
10,000-word story. 

Rider Haggard asks from $75 to 
$100 a column of 1,500 words and 
will not write an article for which less 
than $io,coo is to be paid. Two 
hundred thousand dollars was paid to 
Alphonse Daudet for his Sappho, the 
highest price ever paid for a novel. 

MUSICAL, 

Three interesting recitals were given 
during the month by the musical stu- 
dents of Miss Smith and Prof. Wilde. 
The recitals consisted of both vocal 
and instrumental selections, inter- 
spersed with recitations by pupils of 
Miss Shelley's elocutionary class. 

The large attendance of students at 
these exercises shows their apprecia- 
tion of both teachers' and pupils' ef- 
forts. 



The highest inhabited place in the 
world is the custom-house of Anco- 
marca, in Peru, 16,000 feet above the 
sea. 

x 

It takes, it is said, the tusks of 75,- 
000 elephants a year to supply the 
world's piano keys, billiard balls and 
knife handles. 

After the tire is punctured, 

After the wind's all gone, 
After you're in the country, 

Ten or twelve miles from home — 
That's when you'll feel discouraged 

All by yourself alone- 
After the tire is punctured 

And the air-pump is left at home. 



93 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The fool seeketh to pluck the fly 
from the mule's hind leg, but the 
wise man letteth the job to the lowest 
bidder. 



* 



Mr. S. si Jgs, "A son of the desert 
I'll be." 

Miss K. sings, "Oh, to be on the 
desert with thee." 



* 

* * 



Miss K. (as she sees a second man 
named H. coming to the porch) — 
"Two is company and three is a 
crowd." 



ANYTHING YOU WANT IN 

Cameras g^Z *** 

L G, HARPEL, 

At McGowan's Drug Store, 

S. W. Cor. 7th and Cumberland 
LEBANON, PA. 

E, B, MARSHALL, M.D, 

No, 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

HARRY ZIMMERMAN, D,D,S„ 
DENTAL ROOMS, 

72 West Main Street, ANNVILLE PA, 



QNOWFLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 

A, C M. HIESTER, Prop. 



FINE JOB PRINTING 

North White Oak Street, ANNVILLE, PA 



Sully — To sit here forever and hold 
your little hand in mine would be 
heaven enough for me ! 

She— Yes ; but if you held my hand K REIDER & CO '< 
all the time nobody would ever have 
a chance to see my engagement ring. 



What animal dropped from the 
clouds ? Why, the rain, dear. — Ex. 



* 

* * 



First Student. — "Are you sick?" 
Second Student. — "Sic sum." — Ex. 



Quiz — How'd you tear your trousers? 
Sprocket (just returned from a coun- 
try ride) — "Chainless dog." — Ex. 



H. H. KREIDER, 
JNO. E. HERR, 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal ; Grain, Seeds, Salt L Feed, 

Office: Railroad St., near Depot. ANMVTT T P PA 
Telephone Connection. /\ininville, rn, 

F, W. FROST, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, P7 

WILLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, ANNVILLE, PA. 



Rensselaer 



JACOB SARGENT, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR. 

18 and 20 West flain St., ANNVILLE. 



Polytechnic'^ 
Institute, 
Troy, N.Y. 



Local examinat ions provided for. Send for a Catalogue 



' I '|_J A PUCDC Desiring positions in any State in the Union should write to us. We charge no <.•»■ 
fj/W. iHHKil mission or salary for our services. Life membership and duplicate registration ['.>' ' g 
* fee. Graduate students in great demand. 100 good teachers wanted immediate 

who can (ill emergency vacancies in Penna. on short notice. Address, H. H. HOPKINS & CO., Hancock, MO" 
Represented in New York, Chicago, San Franciseo, Boston, Denver, New Orleans, Philadelphia and Atlanta. l- ou> 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



99 



HOME EXERCISERS, 50 cents Up. 

Fine, firm, beautiful muscles ; the vigor of superb manhood ; the grace, suppleness* and 
v jnmetry of perfect womanhood obtained through physical culture with the 

McFADDEN HEALTH EXERCISERS 

PATENTED 1897. 

when used as instructed in large 128 page instruction book, containing 53 full page half tones 
(5 b> T illustrating development and exercises. Recommended by thousands of physicians and 
physical culture experts throughout America and Europe. Gives every conceivable motion. 
Each Exerciser fitted with changeable rubbers, adjustable strength from weakest child to 
strongest man. Noiseless. Better grades guaranteed two years. Weight two pounds. Complete 
gymnasium — can be used for Chest Weights, Rowing Machines, Intercostal Apparatuses, 
and Floor Pulley Machines. 

FRONT VIEW RIGHT ARM 
UNDEVELOPED 



BACK VIEW PROF. McFADDEN'S 
RIGHT ARM 




• •• 



Which arm does 
Yours Resemble? 



••• 




WHY HAVE AN ARM 
LIKE THIS? 



WHEN IT CAN JUST AS WELL BE 
FULLY DEVELOPED LIKE THIS. 



One High-Grade Exerciser will do for the Family—the pull can be adjusted in a moment to 

suit the strength of anyone. 




.. .„°) vin & strong man using our high- 
exerciser, full strength, three 
panels, 30 to 50 lbs. Exerciser hung 
m ordinary door hinges. 



Showing lady using same exerciser 
adjusted to medium strength, two 
strands, 15 to ISO lbs. 



Showing child using same exerciser 
adjusted to light strength, inverted 
and palling from floor, one strand 
3 to 5 lbs. 



Home Exercisers from 50 cents Upwards. 

McFADDEN TRAINING OUTFIT 

< -°rnplete, with 128 page Instruction Book, "McFadden's Physicial Training," $2 to $5. Send 
amp for sample pages of large book and profusely illustrated and descriptive pamphlet, con- 
ining high endorsements from prominent people. Liberal terms to agents everywhere. Write 
0r our offer, "How to Get an Exerciser Free." Address, 

BUSINESS MANAGER OF COLLEGE FORUM. 



IOO 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Eastman Business College 

Hiis in its half a century of work 
developed the capacity of thousands 
into well-trained men, capable to fill 
every department of a business career. 
Known everywhere for the thorough- 
ness of the preparation given in the 
least time at the smallest expense. 



The System of Teaching 

Is based on actual daily experience 
in every branch of business, includ. 
ing Merchandising, Bookkeeping 
Banking, Commercial Law, Penman- 
ship, Correspondence. Arithmetic 
Telegraphy, Stenography, Type-writ- 
ing, etc., etc. 




The Journal or the Annual Catalogue will inter- 9 
est you. Write for it. Address |jj 

CLEMENT C. GAINES, President. 

POUQHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



Young Men Trained 



To be all-around business men : — or 
they may take up a special branch of 
business and be THOROUGH in that. 

No better Illustration of the value of 
a business education can be offered 
than the success of those who have 
graduated from Kastman College. 

By the old way, training for business 
was acquired through years of ap- 
prenticeship, but the successful man 
of today is the one who enters the 
field prepared for I he woik he is to do 
by the new and shorter methods of 
Kastman College, the model business , 
school. i 

I ' 



A Thorough Business Man 

Is the description of the man who 
becomes successful, is known and has 
the confidence of the community. 



BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with com- 
petent assistants. Situations secured 
without charge, for all graduates of 
the Business and Short-hand Courses, 
an invaluable feature to many young 
people. Open all the year. Time 
short. Terms reasonable. Address 
as above. 

« -r r 1 -Y r .;; s- r -r y r ■ 7 r ' y t T-Jtfc ^ - 





THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
R A, MAULFAIR, Gen. Agt. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ALL THE LATEST AND BEST POLICIES ISSUED. 

TEACHERS. 

Union Teachers' Agencies of America. 

REV. L. D. BASS, D. D., MANAGER. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Toronto, Can., New Orleans, 
La., New York, N. Y., Washington, D. C, 
San Francisco, Cal., Chicago, 111., St. 
Louis, Mo., and Denver, Colo. 

There are thousands of positions to be filled. 
We had over 8,000 vacancies last season. Un- 
surpassed facilities for placing teachers in any 
part of the U. S. or Canada. One fee registers 
in nine offices. More vacancies than teachers. 

Address all Applications to Pittsburg, Pa. 



J. L. LEMBEKGER. 



FRANK GLEIM. 

LEMBERGER & CO., 
DRUGGISTS and PHARMACISTS, 

9th and Cumberland Sts.. LEBANON, PA. 

Our claim in all we do : 

QUALITY— Of first importance— A CCUE AC Y. 



SO YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 



Patents 



TRADE MARKS, 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRICHTS &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, whether an Invention is 
probably patentable. Communications strictly 
confidential. Oldest apency for securing patents 
in America. We have a Washington office. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the 

SGIEHTIFEO AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circulation of 
any scientific journal, vreekly, terms $3.00 a year; 
•LaOsix months. Specimen copies and Hand 
book on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway, New York. 



$ DOUBLE YOUR INCOME | 

jfc by representing us during your leisure 

I SALARY PAID WEEKLY f 

T to those giving entire time to our work, w 
T Address, giving age, occupation i.ndib 
2? reference, y 
|pODD, MEAD & CO., New York.* 



The Miller Organ 





Is the Finest and Best 
Organ Made. 



Sold all over the world 
upon its merits alone. 



SPECIAL 

INDUCEMENTS 

To Churches, Sunday 
Schools and Ministers. 



Write to us and get our 
prices and terms. 
Catalogue, etc., free. 



MILLER ORGAN CO., 

IaEBANOri, PA. 



RISE & GATES, 

PHOTO ARTISTS 

142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON. 



Special Inducements To Students. 



Translations 

Liitettal Interlinear, 
67 Volumes. 

Dictionaries 

German, French, i 
Italian, Spanish, | 
Ltatin and Greek, if 




Arthur Hinds & Co , | 

4 Cooper Institute, NEW YORK. § 



n 



Cr 



Superior Advantages. 



els cj; et? 



Most Reasonable Rates 



Lebanon Valley College, 

FOUNDED 1866. 

Pop Iiadies and Gentlemen. 

1. Thirty-second Year Opened with Double the Attendance 
last Year. 

Three Commodious Buildings \ Full Classical, Scientific 
and Musical Courses. 

2. An able Faculty ; High Standard ; Progressive Methods ; anc 
Well-selected Library. 

3. Environments of the Most Helpful Character in Social, Mor 
and Religious Life. 

4. A Fine Campus of about Ten Acres for Athletic Sports, and 
well-equipped Gymnasium. 

Winter Term begins January 3d j Spring Term, March 28, 1898, 

ADDRESS, REY H y R Q0p pj, p p re8i(|ent? 

Annville, 



Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler. 

CLUB, COLLEGE L FRATERNITY 
EMBLEMS, WATCHES, DIAMx 
ONDS, JEWELRY. .\ ,\ ,\ A,' 



A.C. Zimmerman, 



DEALER I|M 





HM 



198 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates Furnished 

S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS. 

One door West Petin'a. House, Annville. 



758 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis, 
Blank Book Manufacture 

AND JOB BOOK BINDER 



DESIGNING. WOOD ENGRAVING. 

PHOTOENGRAVING. 

Penn'a, Engraving Co,, 

114420 S. 7th St., PHILADELPHIA. 

COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



. . . RULING, 
NUMBERING, 



WIRE 
STITCHH 



1125 and 1127 North Third St, 
HARRISBURG, PA.